Canadian indigenous bishop slams ‘doctrine of discovery’

first_imgCanadian indigenous bishop slams ‘doctrine of discovery’ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 19, 2017 at 11:31 am Good points, William R. Well said. I think maybe the “historical circumstances” you mention are what are spoken of in the book “Guns, Germs and Steel.’ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Indigenous Ministries Posted Aug 17, 2017 [Anglican Communion News Service] The “doctrine of discovery” – the idea that indigenous people need to be discovered and westernized – has been criticized by the national indigenous bishop of Canada. Bishop Mark MacDonald made his comments during a visit to Australia, where he attended a number of events, including a retreat for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Anglican leaders retreat in central Australia.Full article. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Joan Mistretta says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (4) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA September 4, 2017 at 7:01 pm Well said. Anglican Communion, Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 17, 2017 at 11:20 pm “Westernized” is confused with modernization. The problem is distinguishing one from the other. Modernization may or may not be a good thing; but people (including indigineous people) seem to want its benefits. The Europeans modernized first, not becaus of any inherent superiority, but because of historical circumstances. They brought it to indigineous peoples. I’m sure that Bishop MacDonald has plenty to say about the negative effects of the Europeans on the indigenous people, but I doubt that he, or they, want to stop using their cell phones. If westernization is a matter of culture, then Bishop MacDonald is engaging in one of the most westernizing endeavors among the indigenous people; proselytizing the Christian religion. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA William Russiello says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 19, 2017 at 11:35 am Well, I guess I will add to my comment, if I may. I don’t think that in this day and age proselytizing the Christian religion belongs in the rest of the group of behaviors. Today there is much more choice involved and much less power to threaten. Keith Gardner says: Joan Mistretta says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Alaska Native villages struggling to preserve way of life offer…

first_imgAlaska Native villages struggling to preserve way of life offer warm welcome to Episcopal bishops The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (4) Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Keith Gardner says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Environment & Climate Change, Rev Judy Hoover says: September 26, 2017 at 2:47 pm A good time was had by all. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Richard Basta says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab House of Bishops, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN September 26, 2017 at 4:02 pm This was incredible time in Alaska. The trips to the villages ( Tom (VT) and I flew to Nenana) with about 8 others) we were warmly and sincerely welcomed. It was indeed a privilege to visit with the people. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY House of Bishops Fall 2017, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET September 26, 2017 at 2:16 pm I’m moved with the love that was so present in the bishops visits. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal bishops and residents of Venetie, Alaska, gather Sept. 23 at the bank of the Chandalar River to bless the water, land and people. Venetie was one of eight villages in Interior Alaska visited by different groups of bishops, who are attending the fall House of Bishops meeting in Fairbanks. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Fairbanks, Alaska] Sunrise in Fairbanks was 7:40 a.m. on Sept. 23, but Diocese of Alaska Bishop Mark Lattime had a nonnegotiable command for his fellow bishops: Don’t be late.They weren’t. Beating the sun by 10 minutes, they boarded the bus for the airport at 7:30 a.m. sharp, bringing with them their rochets and chimeres, their boxes of food to give to the villagers they were to meet, and their personal expectations for what awaited them in Alaska’s northern Interior.Bishop Prince Singh of the Diocese of Rochester in New York was in good spirits on the bus. Some of his thoughts turned to his previous missionary work in a poor region of southern India. His group of bishops was headed this day for Arctic Village, where families of Native Alaskans on the edge of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge still survive largely on hunting and fishing.At the airport office of Northern Alaska Tour Company and Arctic Air, Bishop Greg Brewer of the Diocese of Central Florida took his turn as the bishops placed their travel bags on a scale to be weighed: a five-pound backpack here, a 10-pound duffel there.Precise weight measurements are crucial in small planes like these, an experience that reminded Brewer of traveling about a decade ago on similar flights in Uganda when visiting a partner diocese. Now Brewer was one of six bishops flying to the village of Allakaket on Day 3 of the Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops meeting.An emphasis on creation care and racial justice at this fall’s House of Bishops meeting made Alaska the perfect laboratory, Lattime told Episcopal News Service earlier in the week. And in the Alaskan lab, the central catalyst for the bishops’ reactions was this day of travel, including eight trips to Interior villages. A ninth group drove to a former gold mining site, and other bishops remained in Fairbanks for a procession along the Chena River.In the 2 p.m. hour, the bishops at all 10 locations were to bless the land, water and people. Episcopalians across the Alaska diocese had been asked to participate at the same time in their local congregations.“The idea of having, all across the state of Alaska, this blessing at 2 o’clock is powerful,” Lattime had told the bishops a day earlier as they discussed ways environmental justice is interwoven with the plight of indigenous people, especially those suffering the effects of climate change.But what can a delegation of bishops do for the residents of a struggling Alaska Native village? Lattime assured the bishops they bring gifts of faith.“You are bishops of the church. You are the symbols of the unity of the church. You connect these people with your people,” Lattime said. “You have been given the gift of the Holy Spirit, and you bring the ability to connect people in prayer and offer your blessing.”The bishops carried those words of encouragement with them to the airport the next morning. Bishop Mariann Budde of the Diocese of Washington studied a map of Alaska as she prepared to leave for Huslia. She said she hoped the bishops’ visit would be worthwhile for the village residents, and that she would be able to open herself fully to hearing their stories.Bishop Dorsey McConnell of the Diocese of Pittsburgh had packed a tangible offering: a bottle of water taken from the Conemaugh River, which flooded Johnstown, Pennsylvania in 1889. He planned to dump the water into the Yukon River as a symbol of recovery as his group offered blessings in Eagle, a village that suffered its own devastating flood in 2009.The sun was now illuminating the edges of the gray clouds. Pilots flying into the Interior pay close attention to a condition they call “having weather.”“We don’t really have weather in Venetie,” means the clouds have lifted enough to allow takeoff and landing there.Guest services representative Katie Tasky stood on a bench and gave the bishops a final rundown of what to expect on the twin-engine Piper Navajo Chieftain planes, which had enough room for a pilot and nine passengers.“Window and aisle seat, everyone gets one,” she said.Another employee called for the first group of Episcopal travelers: “Arctic Village!” The bishops and spouses boarded their plane and were in the air by 9:05 a.m.Pilot Bill Thompson takes Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas’ bag before leaving on a flight to Venetie, Alaska, on Sept. 23. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceBill Thompson, the pilot for the group heading to Venetie, offered his co-pilot seat to any interested passenger. Retired Bishop Neff Powell of the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia volunteered.“Hop in and do that important preflight checklist for me,” Thompson joked.With six bishops, two spouses and a reporter buckled in and wearing their headsets, Thompson maneuvered the plane behind the others in line at the start of the runway, an unusually busy day for Arctic Air. “You guys have certainly cleared out our ramp today,” Thompson said.Two planes were ahead. Then one. At 9:40 a.m., with the Venetie flight cleared for takeoff, the plane buzzed down the runway and began soaring over Fairbanks, charting a path north.‘A wonderful, wonderful way of life’The bishops were welcomed warmly in Alaska even before boarding flights to the Interior. Elders and leaders of local Native organizations addressed the House of Bishops on Sept. 22 at sessions that focused on Native culture and environmental threats to a way of life that has been followed here for thousands of years.Poldine Carlo, a founder of the Fairbanks Native Association, shares stories of growing up in the Interior with bishops gathered in Fairbanks on Sept. 22. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“We didn’t get rich, but we had a good life,” Poldine Carlo, 96, said as she detailed some of that life for the bishops at the Westmark Fairbanks Hotel and Convention Center.Carlo is best known as one of the founders of the Fairbanks Native Association, a support group created in the 1960s at a time when Alaska Natives faced open discrimination. But what resonated most with the bishops were her stories of living off the land in and around Nulato, where she grew up.As she spoke of her tribe’s fish camp and of animal tracking with her family, there was an audible ache of nostalgia in her voice – knowing part of that way is forever gone, and what’s left of it also may disappear.“It was such a wonderful, wonderful way of life,” Carlo said. “To think, at the time I was home, I never, ever thought there would be an end to that.”Hunting, fishing and trapping continue in the Interior, but Native communities that pride themselves on their subsistence lifestyle find it increasingly difficult to provide for themselves in the old ways.“Alaska is probably one of the last places on Earth where native people are still rooted to the land. We live off the fruits of the good Earth,” said the Rev. Shirley Lee, executive director of the Tanana Chiefs Conference’s Housing First program and a priest at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Fairbanks.For every food there is a season, she said: from moose to caribou, fish to berries. “And when we move away from those seasonal practices and rely on the local grocery store,” Lee said, “it deadens our spirit.”The changing environment is one factor in that cultural decline.“Right now the changes we’re seeing in our climate, we have to address it. … It’s very noticeable up here,” Bernadette Demientieff of the conservationist Gwich’in Steering Committee told the bishops. “Our elders and our leaders are at a point where they’re taking it up on their own because no one else is listening.”The Episcopal Church has long joined in that activism, and its Episcopal Public Policy Network has specifically supported the efforts of Demientieff and other Gwich’in activists in their fighting to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from proposals to allow oil drilling there. The north coast of Alaska, part of which the refuge encompasses, is a major caribou birthing ground and considered sacred land by Alaska Natives who hunt the caribou when the herd migrates deeper into the Interior.“This issue really is symbolic of how we are going to treat our remaining intact ecosystems on the planet,” Princess Johnson told the bishops. Johnson was part of an Episcopal Church delegation that traveled to Paris for the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, and she is a leader in the grassroots group Fairbanks Climate Action Coalition.“You cannot really separate environment from social justice issues. We really need to be mindful of that,” Johnson said. “I really honestly believe we’re all here on this planet for a reason right now and are being spiritually called upon to act.”The Rev. Shirley Lee addresses the House of Bishops on Sept. 22 in Fairbanks. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe Alaska Natives thanked the bishops for traveling to Alaska and listening to their concerns. Lee asked the bishops, as they prepared to travel across the Interior, not to see that vast landscape as barren, undeveloped property.“Look at that and remember there is a history behind every inch of land that you are traversing,” she said, “that history of the Native people here, and how your blessing will help further the preservation of our culture.”Village welcomes visiting bishopsThompson, the Arctic Air pilot on the flight to Venetie, was not at first fully aware of the nature of his cargo. Bishops on an Interior expedition were something novel.Realizing his passengers were flying over unfamiliar terrain, Thompson, 47, gladly played the tour guide. A 26-year veteran of the Alaskan skies, he pointed out the Fort Knox gold mine, which still operates just north of Fairbanks. He described how the Tanana and Yukon rivers, carrying glacial silt, had created wide flood plains over thousands of years. He identified the snow-dusted peaks below as the White Mountains, a jagged range dwarfed to the south by the Alaska Range, its towering Denali hidden in the clouds this morning.“We have the Fort Yukon weather,” Thompson radioed back to the control tower.He began dropping the plane to 4,000 feet to fly below the thick layer of clouds hovering above that village. The Yukon River appeared below. The arbitrary dotted line of the Arctic Circle receded behind them. A moose was spotted wading in a marsh on the edge of a lake.The village of Venetie, Alaska, is seen from above. The dirt strip in the center of the village is the former runway. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAs they approached Venetie, Thompson circled the plane over the village and the Chandalar River so he could point out the old dirt runway in the center of the village and the large school building. About 200 people are estimated to live in Venetie, most of them in small log homes built on dirt and gravel roads stretching out from the village’s center.Mildred Killbear, center left, and Eunice Williams greet the bishops after their landing in Venetie on Sept. 23. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAfter landing on the gravel surface of the newer runway just before 11 a.m., Thompson taxied to the spot where a group of villagers in pickup trucks and on all-terrain vehicles were waiting to greet the bishops with a round of handshakes and hugs.Mildred Killbear and Eunice Williams escorted the visitors to the center of the village, a few minutes away by pickup truck.Killbear, 68, was born in Fort Yukon and lived in Arctic Village as a child before moving with her parents to Venetie. “I’ve lived here all my life,” she said.Williams, at 80, is one of 20 village elders whose pictures hang in a display case inside the school building. “We’re still living in the old cultural way. We still depend on the subsistence lifestyle,” she said.Of the 20 elders honored in the display, she is among the few still alive.Eunice Williams and the Rev. Margo Simple show the bishops Venetie’s school. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAt the school, they met the Rev. Margo Simple, the Episcopal priest in Venetie who also works as a community health aide. Simple gave the bishops and spouses a tour of the building, as she and other village residents thanked them for coming.“Pray for us and the land and the animals,” Williams said.Myra Thumma was preparing a caribou meat feast for the bishops at Venetie’s community hall, a short walk from the school. The group made its way over to the small, one-room building, where residents greeted them with conversations about the hall’s wood-burning stove, about the villagers’ families and about the many ways of eating salmon, from burgers to salads. The bishops presented gifts of food – a large box filled with eggs, fruit, Nutri-Grain bars and other items that otherwise would command high prices at the village store.“This is the first time we’ve had so many bishops in one building,” Eddie Frank said. He, too, thanked them for coming.Frank, 67, is a formal tribal administrator who now works on the village’s roads. “We don’t call them roads, we call them trails,” he corrected. He also is known for his skills at trapping wolf, mink, lynx, marten, fox and any other animal popular for its skin and fur.Milder, shorter winters have made trapping more difficult, Frank said. Dog sledding and other winter travel depend on adequate snow cover, and he thinks the animals are more easily scared away by humans’ scent in the warmer air.“The weather has really changed,” Frank said.Myra Thumma points out the caribou meal that was prepared for the visiting bishops at the Venetie community hall. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThumma also worries about the effects of climate change. It has affected caribou migration patterns, she said.She attended college in the southeast Alaska city of Sitka, and she met her husband in Fairbanks, but eventually she had to get back to her home village.“I can’t live in the city,” Thumma said. Venetie is “the only life I know. This is part of me.”By 1:45 p.m., Simple had led the bishops to Good Shepherd Episcopal Church for the afternoon’s liturgy. A wood stove warmed the inside of the log church as a handful of villagers gathered in the pews for the short service.Afterward, the bishops in their rochets and chimeres processed out the front door following a 9-year-old girl who held high a wooden cross. They made their way down to the river, a young boy sprinting ahead of them.Under gray skies and the hazy afternoon sun, the bishops offered their blessings and thanks, for the river and land, for the moose and caribou, for the boats moored on the riverbank, for the village elders and leaders. They offered prayers for young people suffering from addiction, another threat to the village’s way of life.When it was over, the visitors and their hosts gathered for group photos, a family of worshipers bound by faith.To Nenana for a potlatchA day later, members of that faith family filled the community hall in Nenana, Alaska, nearly to capacity.Nenana is a village a 55-mile drive southwest of Fairbanks. The Episcopal Church was once the only Christian denomination with a presence in the Interior, and its history in Nenana dates to 1905 and the mission church of St. Mark’s.On Sept. 24, after splitting up in the morning to attend Sunday worship services in Fairbanks, North Pole and Nenana, the bishops joined together again in Nenana to attend the afternoon potlatch prepared by the St. Mark’s congregation and the village’s Native community.A potlatch is a Native Alaskan ceremonial meal featuring traditional food, drumming and dancing. This was a meal to leave no one hungry: moose meat, moose soup, garden salad, pasta salad, potato salad, fry bread, rolls, tea and dessert. Helping after helping was served up and down the long rows of bishops and residents who were seated in front of the makeshift paper tablecloth placed on the floor at their feet.The bishops, their spouses and residents of the Nenana area prepare for a potlatch feast Sept. 24. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAs the dinner wound down, several bishops and Native leaders spoke to the crowd, expressing mutual gratitude for the experience of this “good-time” potlatch.“I’m extremely blessed tonight to see the bishops in Alaska,” said Bessie Titus, a longtime Alaska deputy of the Episcopal Church’s General Convention. It’s a great honor, she said, “to us as a diocese, to us as a Native community.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry offered Nenana the blessing of the Episcopal Church and received a roar of approval with his heartfelt “thank you,” which he repeated over and over.Lattime called himself “probably the most blessed in this place” because his family of bishops was getting a chance to meet the family of Alaskans that has adopted him.The Rev. Trimble Gilbert speaks at the Nenana potlatch. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“This is what the love of Christ is all about,” he said. “This is what becoming the body of Christ is all about.”The Rev. Trimble Gilbert, an Arctic Village priest and prominent Gwich’in community leader, echoed others in marveling at the hundreds of people who had gathered for the day’s potlatch.“In Nenana, we honor you,” he said, before explaining that the potlatch represents his tribe’s values, its commitment to taking care of each other. Like the hunting traditions that provided moose for the meal, the potlatch follows the ways of their ancestors.“We honor them for us to be here,” he said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service September 26, 2017 at 7:54 am I know many bishops attended but would love to see a list of those who were there. Thank you for this fine article. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Racial Justice & Reconciliation By David PaulsenPosted Sep 25, 2017 Ann Ely says: Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

The Beautiful Bulls on CGW ahead of their clash with the Chiefs

first_imgThursday May 24, 2012 The Beautiful Bulls on CGW ahead of their clash with the Chiefs The lovely Hayley Holt paid the Bulls a visit as they trained in Auckland ahead of their Friday Super Rugby clash with the Chiefs in Hamilton. Here is a quick look at some of the amusing interviews that were aired on popular New Zealand sports show, The Crowd Goes Wild.She chatted to Pierre Spies, Zane Kirchner, and Percy’s bleached brother, Wynand Olivier.Check out the related posts below for some excellent CGW updates from during RWC2011Credit: tcgwADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Funnies Related Articles 29 WEEKS AGO WATCH: American reacts to brilliant Nigel… 29 WEEKS AGO Video of John Kirwan apologising while wearing… 29 WEEKS AGO Simon Zebo reveals how ‘absolute lunatic’… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life Reports10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Country House Renovation / 2260mm Arquitectes

first_img 2014 CopyHouses, Renovation•Vidular, Spain Houses Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/530529/country-house-renovation-2260mm-arquitectes Clipboard Save this picture!© Lluís Bernat+ 22 Share ArchDaily Projects “COPY” Country House Renovation / 2260mm Arquitectes photographs:  Lluís Bernat Photographs:  Lluís Bernat Structure:EGOINRendering:PLAY-TIMEConstruction:Jesús CruzArchitects In Charge:Manel Casellas, Mar Puig de la BellacasaCity:VidularCountry:SpainMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Lluís BernatRecommended ProductsWood Boards / HPL PanelsEGGERPerfectSense Matt Lacquered BoardsArmchairsB&B ItaliaArmchair – AyanaWoodLunawoodLunawood Thermowood Façade in Eaton Socon Pre-SchoolText description provided by the architects. Renovation of an old county house in Cantabria, in northern Spain. The house had the typical structure of ancient houses of that zone: stone walls and a timber structure of columns and beams.Save this picture!Ground Floor PlanUnfortunatelly, at the time we were designing the project, the house partially felt down. Only 2 stone facades remained standing, so in fact we had to rebuild completely the house.Save this picture!© Lluís BernatThe house was included in a catalogue of ancient buildings of Cantabria, so we had to maintain its volume, facades and materials.Save this picture!© Lluís BernatThe project rebuilds the house, maintaining the appearance from outside. Inside, we used a contemporary language, but using the same materials that existed before. We have used a dry construction system, with cross laminated timber structure, supported by timber columns and beams. The panel can be seen at the ceilings, and it works also as a parquet floor in first and second floors. We have reused existing stone bases at ground floor to support timber columns.Save this picture!© Lluís BernatA triple-height atrium with a staircase is the main space of the house. You can see it from the kitchen/dinning and living room in ground floor, or from the bedrooms corridor in first floor. In ground floor a fireplace is placed just in this atrium. New facades were built using existing stone.Project gallerySee allShow lessNorman Foster Joins Hollywood Stars in Petition Against Venice Cruise ShipsArchitecture NewsHouse in Gokurakuji / Naoya Kawabe Architect & AssociatesSelected Projects Share Spain Country House Renovation / 2260mm ArquitectesSave this projectSaveCountry House Renovation / 2260mm Arquitectes CopyAbout this office2260mm ArquitectesOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationVidularHousesRefurbishmentSpainPublished on July 30, 2014Cite: “Country House Renovation / 2260mm Arquitectes” 30 Jul 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldRetractable Walls – Stepped & Sloped SpacesVinyl Walls3MArchitectural Finishes DI-NOC in SkyPodsShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma EDoorsC.R. LaurenceMonterey Bi-Folding Glass Wall SystemTable LampsLouis PoulsenLamps – Panthella PortableBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersSealantsEffisusMetal Roof Flashing – Stopper MRDropped CeilingsPure + FreeFormLinear Clip-Strip Ceiling SystemUrban ShadingPunto DesignPavilion – CUBEVentilated / Double Skin FacadeULMA Architectural SolutionsPaper Facade Panel in Nokia LibraryLouversAccoyaAccoya® Wood for Shutters and LouvresSpa / WellnessKlafsGyms & Relaxation RoomsMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Year:  Photographs 2014 “COPY” Area:  300 m² Area:  300 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Architects: 2260mm Arquitectes Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/530529/country-house-renovation-2260mm-arquitectes Clipboardlast_img read more

Small House in Nha Trang / Chơn.a

first_img Projects Houses “COPY” “COPY” Photographs ArchDaily 2017 Area:  73 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Vietnam Save this picture!© TaDalat Design+ 29Curated by Fernanda Castro Share CopyHouses•Nha Trang, Vietnamcenter_img Manufacturers: Aparici, Grespania, panoramah!®, Lamp Lighting, CHCProject Team:Nguyễn Thành Thiện, Dương Thị TuyếtConstruction:Mai Trần Đăng VươngArchitect In Charge:Nguyễn Công ToànCity:Nha TrangCountry:VietnamMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© TaDalat DesignRecommended ProductsWindowsFAKRORoof Windows – FPP-V preSelect MAXWindowsAccoyaAccoya® Windows and DoorsDoorsVEKADoors – VEKAMOTION 82DoorsGorter HatchesRoof Hatch – RHT AluminiumText description provided by the architects. Small house is a small project in the chain of “multilayered space” project. It is located in an alleyway of NhaTrang city, that dense construction density along with many spatially chaotic architectural forms.Save this picture!SectionThis house serves a young family who has very little time at home, because of the business at a traditional market that occupies most of the time and make a lot of pressure from the noise and dust every day. The crux of the human problem that we need to remove, creasing a quite and simple space, close to nature, light, trees and natural winds. That people are exposed, interacted with each other most.Save this picture!© TaDalat DesignTown house/ tube-house is a popular form in urban areas in Việt nam. We decided to create a living space surrounded by two layers of nature, natural light and wind, along with two metal sheaths that acted like safety curtain, light regulation, wind and visual sense of human landscape.The vertical axis of transportation is subdivided and arranged to move around the house and the transitional buffer space helps to increase the interaction between family members. At each buffer of traffic brings to a sense of changing space close to nature.Save this picture!© TaDalat DesignThe house has lightweight as a warm lantern in the alley at night, and the cover creates an interactive space between people and space in the closeness, but still keeps the privacy and wittingly.Save this picture!© TaDalat DesignProject gallerySee allShow lessThe Bihar Museum / Maki and Associates + OpolisSelected ProjectsSaudi Arabia’s Inaugural Entry to the 2018 Venice Biennale to Focus on Design ProcessArchitecture News Share Year:  Small House in Nha Trang / Chơn.aSave this projectSaveSmall House in Nha Trang / Chơn.a Architects: Chơn.a Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/889690/small-house-in-nha-trang-cho Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/889690/small-house-in-nha-trang-cho Clipboard Small House in Nha Trang / Chơn.a Photographs:  TaDalat Design Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project CopyAbout this officeChơn.aOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesNha TrangVietnamPublished on March 05, 2018Cite: “Small House in Nha Trang / Chơn.a” 04 Mar 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StoneShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectDoorsRaynorGarage Door – Advantage SeriesConcreteSika3D Concrete PrintingSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Bre-ClassSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights in Atelier Zimmerlistrasse OfficeWindowsswissFineLineSliding Windows in Villa LakesideSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Smart CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing in Roofs & CanopiesSound BoothsFrameryMeeting Pod – Framery Q – Flip n’ FoldWall / Ceiling LightsAsaf WeinbroomLighting – Linestra 110 BrassMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

£30m cultural protection fund opens

first_imgPalmyra, Syria, close-up shot. Photo © Zeledi, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 and adapted from the original.Assuming the Cultural Property Bill, currently before the House of Lords, is passed, the UK will become the first permanent member of the Security Council to have ratified both the Convention and its two Protocols.Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport John Whittingdale said:“Cultural property is of huge importance and helps people better understand their shared history. At a time when some of the world’s most important heritage assets are under threat, this fund, together with our ratification of the Hague Convention, will help us protect cultural heritage in the Middle East and North Africa”. Advertisement Main image: “The structures that stood there for 1,700 years have been forever destroyed.” Photo ©DVIDSHUB, licensed under CC BY 2.0 and adapted from the original. Howard Lake | 27 June 2016 | News A new £30 million fund to protect and conserve cultural sites around the world is now open to applications from arts, culture and heritage organisations.The UK’s Cultural Protection Fund is managed by the British Council in partnership with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS).It is focused on supporting organisations that protect cultural heritage in countries in the Middle East and North Africa region including Syria, Iraq, Libya, Lebanon, and Tunisia. Successful applicants will use the grants to:ensure cultural heritage under threat is researched, documented, conserved and restored to safeguard against permanent losshelp build the capacity of local professionals and ensure they have sufficient business or specialist skills to manage and promote cultural assets which will benefit the local economyhelp local people to identify and value cultural heritage, and have a good understanding of what can be done to protect their cultural heritage and the role it plays in society and the economy.  265 total views,  3 views today £30m cultural protection fund opens About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis24  266 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis24 Tagged with: arts Funding heritage Applications to the Cultural Protection Fund are now open. The call for Expressions of Interest closes on 1 August, and applications close on 31 August.last_img read more

Ataque contra inmigrantes dirigido a todos los trabajadores

first_imgEn su forma cruel habitual, la administración de Trump hizo obvio en la primera semana de noviembre que tiene la intención de poner fin al programa de Estatus de Protección Temporal, (EPT)El programa EPT permite a los refugiados de países donde ha habido desastres naturales como huracanes o terremotos, o violencia política como una guerra civil, vivir y trabajar legalmente en los Estados Unidos. Lo otorga el Secretario de Seguridad Nacional con el asesoramiento del Secretario de Estado.La mayoría de los que estan dentro del EPT provienen de El Salvador (195.000), Honduras (57.000) o Haití (50.000). (Revista sobre Migración y Seguridad Humana, julio de 2017).Cerca del 90 por ciento ahora son trabajadores en áreas metropolitanas de las costas este y oeste. Se estima que tienen cerca de 275.000 niños, que nacieron aquí y son ciudadanos de los EE. UU. Aproximadamente un tercio está comprando una casa. El tiempo promedio que han estado viviendo en los EE. UU. es de 19 años. (Center for American Progress, 10 de octubre)La administración de Trump proclama en voz alta que fue elegido para poner fin al EPT. Estos intolerantes identifican a las personas de color en el programa EPT, proclamando que son la razón por la cual los salarios son bajos y los empleos escasos, –en vez de admitir que así es como funciona una economía capitalista cuando puede explotar al máximo a los trabajadores porque su estado precario.Varios economistas dicen que la presencia de trabajadores protegidos por EPT realmente beneficia a las economías de las áreas donde están concentradas. Además, el dinero que envían a las familias equivale al 15 por ciento del producto nacional bruto de los tres países que representan la mayoría de los destinatarios de EPT. (Pew Research Center, 2015)Pero en el esquema de Trump, inflamar la supremacía blanca e incitar al racismo vale el riesgo de compromisos menores a la economía.Cuando Elaine Duke, la Secretaria Interina de Seguridad Nacional, decidió que no tenía suficiente información sobre Honduras y extendió el EPT para los hondureños otros seis meses, John Kelly, el general retirado que es el jefe de personal de Trump, la llamó a larga distancia de Asia para decirle que reconsidere. Ella se negó y dijo que se retirará cuando se confirme una secretaria permanente.La decisión del EPT para los haitianos vendrá a finales de enero y para los salvadoreños a principios de marzo.Una cantidad de haitianos que se habían mudado a Brasil para trabajos relacionados con las Olimpiadas y los juegos de la Copa del Mundo intentaron ingresar a los Estados Unidos en EPT. Terminaron yendo a Canadá cuando no pudieron ingresar a los EE. UU. Hay comunidades haitianas importantes en Montreal y la ciudad de Quebec.Hasta agosto, un gran número de haitianos cruzaron desde los EE. UU. A Canadá y solicitaron asilo. Si hubieran intentado un cruce legal, se requeriría que Canadá los envíe de vuelta en virtud de los tratados existentes con Washington. Pero un cruce “ilegal” les permite solicitar asilo.El gobierno canadiense se está preparando para una gran afluencia de refugiados de los EE. UU., Especialmente si la protección de EPT se retira a los 195,000 salvadoreños en marzo. El sistema canadiense para escuchar solicitudes de asilo está muy retrasado, pero las personas con un reclamo de asilo pendiente pueden obtener trabajo antes de que se escuche su caso. (Globe and Mail, 7 de noviembre)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Men’s Tennis cruises past SMU

first_imgWelcome TCU Class of 2025 printThe TCU Men’s tennis team took care of business today against SMU, sweeping them 7-0.It was the Frogs 25th straight win at home.  Doubles duos Reese Stadler and Hudson Blake along with Alex Rybakov and Cameron Norrie dominated their matches. Stadler and Hudson won 6-0 and the Rybakov-Norrie duo won 6-1.Head Coach David Roditi said he was very impressed with his teams doubles performance.“We jumped all over them in doubles,” Roditi said.  “We played a great doubles point, it was the best doubles point we had played all year.”The momentum from the doubles matches carried over into the singles matches.Rynakov dominated his match winning 6-4, 6-1.  Norrie won his match 6-4, 6-3.  Coach Roditi said he was proud of his top guys for getting the job done early.Roditi said he was proud of his top guys for getting the job done early.“Top of the lineup took care of business right away,” Roditi said.Trevor Johnson sealed the overall win with a backhand down the line to win his second game 7-6.  He broke out a dance to celebrate the overall win.Jerry Lopez, Eduardo Nava and Guillermo Nuñez won their matches to make the final score 7-0.TCU finished up non-conference play on a high note and looks to carry this momentum into conference play.The Frogs take on No. 9 ranked Oklahoma on Friday at 5:30 at home. Twitter Linkedin Facebook Blake Grable + posts TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Frogs fall to Dallas Baptist 9-1 Blake Grablehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/blake-grable/ Linkedin Facebook Previous articleWater line replacement begins Thursday on Bellaire Drive NorthNext articleStudents prepping for research symposium Blake Grable RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Schlossnagle becomes winningest coach in TCU baseball history ReddIt ReddIt Twitter World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Doctson impresses at NFL Combine Blake Grablehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/blake-grable/ Finding Trent Johnson’s replacement: A few names to consider Blake Grablehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/blake-grable/ Blake Grablehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/blake-grable/last_img read more

Sergei Duvanov appeal hearing: A chance for the authorities to finally let justice be done

first_img January 15, 2021 Find out more The appeal of journalist Sergei Duvanov against his 28 January convictionfor the alleged rape of a minor will be heard on 11 March. Duvanov wassentenced to three and half years in prison after an investigation and trialmarred by many irregularities and violations of his rights as a defendant. News February 5, 2021 Find out more RSF_en October 30, 2020 Find out more March 7, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Sergei Duvanov appeal hearing: A chance for the authorities to finally let justice be done Follow the news on Kazakhstan Help by sharing this information to go further KazakhstanEurope – Central Asia Kazakh reporter accuses police of attacking her Regional newspaper editor harassed after investigating real estate scandal News Reporters prevented from covering Kazakh parliamentary elections Reporters Without Borders today called on the authorities of Kazakhstan to finally let justice be done when the regional court of Taldy-Korgan (350 km. from Almaty) on 11 March hears the appeal of journalist Sergei Duvanov against his 28 January conviction for the alleged rape of a minor, for which he received a sentence of three and half years in prison.”The Kazakh authorities should bear in mind that Sergei Duvanov’s appeal is a democratic test for their country, and that they still have a chance to show their support for due process,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard said.”The harassment to which Duvanov and all the independent and opposition media are subjected in Kazakhstan would suggest that this case is politically motivated,” Ménard said. “The Kazakh judicial system has not so far dealt with Duvanov in a fair and open manner. On the contrary, there were many irregularities in the investigation and constant violation of defence rights during the trial itself.”The European Parliament passed a resolution on 13 February demanding Duvanov’s immediate release and voicing deep concern about the investigation, prosecution and sentence. On 30 January, the US government also expressed its disquiet about the sentence. The Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) on 28 January criticised the legal irregularities and lack of evidence supporting the charges and urged the appeal court to take account of these shortcomings when it considered the case.The editor of Bulletin, an opposition magazine published by the International Bureau for Human Rights, Duvanov was arrested on 28 October last year and accused of raping a 14-year-old girl. He had been due to fly the next day to the United States to present a report on democracy and human rights in Kazakhstan. He went on hunger strike for 10 days to protest his innocence. At a press conference at the European Commission in Brussels on 29 November, President Nursultan Nazarbayev said Duvanov’s guilt had been proved. When Duvanov’s trial opened on 24 December, his lawyers were not allowed to examine the entire case file. Viewing the proceedings as a farce, Duvanov dismissed his lawyers on 23 January, the day after the court rejected their motion for the charges to be dropped for lack of evidence and because of the many legal irregularities.Duvanov is one of the government’s most outspoken critics and regularly denounces the harassment of the independent media and opposition. He is also being prosecuted for “affront to the honour and dignity” of President Nazarbayev. On 28 August last year, he was beaten up by thugs and badly injured.During a fact-finding mission to Almaty in July last year, a Reporters Without Borders representative met several times with Duvanov. He spoke of the intimidation and harassment to which he had been subjected by the authorities and predicted that they would probably accuse him in a sex or drugs scandal. “I’m still free and in good health,” he said, “but this cannot last.”Kazakh human rights groups and opposition journalists say the security services often try to implicate the government’s opponents in scandals in order. KazakhstanEurope – Central Asia Receive email alerts News Organisation Newslast_img read more

Editorial – Illness and indignity

first_imgVanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Twitter Previous articleTriathlon – Limerick’s O’Brien set for Baku Triathlon #videoNext article43 shorts in Tres Court Fest John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSeditorialhealthHSElimerickuniversity hospital limerick Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsEditorial – Illness and indignityBy John Keogh – June 11, 2015 916 Linkedin WhatsApp Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival center_img Print  AT THE age of 101, the elderly woman who was left on a trolley in the emergency department at University Hospital Limerick for 25 hours has lived through the 1916 rising, two world wars, and no doubt seen her fair share of illness and life’s ups and downs.Having paid her taxes and charges her whole life and dedicated years to looking after a family, it’s not asking too much to expect to be looked after when she falls ill in her later years.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up At such an advanced age, she is presumably quite frail and vulnerable and needs a little extra care.In a developed country with a supposedly advanced healthcare system, patients do not expect to be left waiting five hours for an ambulance.They do not expect to see a queue of 11 ambulances waiting outside the hospital for up to three hours as there is nowhere to put the patients.And, at 101 years old, they expect to be treated with a little dignity, not left on a trolley in a busy hospital with little or no privacy or comfort for an entire day, which is just what happened to an elderly Clare woman in University Hospital Limerick this week.Not only that, but the granddaughter of an 81-year-old woman also contacted the Limerick Post this week revealing that her grandmother, who also waited on a trolley for 24 hours, was left sitting on a commode for two hours. She was then put in adult nappies as the hospital didn’t have sufficient staff to help her use the toilet.The nurses themselves were so upset and frustrated over the conditions in the UHL emergency department last week that one of them even urged the woman’s granddaughter to contact the press to help highlight the issue.The HSE apologised for the delays experienced by patients last week, but apologies are only words, words that we have heard time and time again in recent years, and they mean nothing if they are not followed up with actions that will prevent these situations from happening again. Advertisement Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Facebook Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Emaillast_img read more