Alaska Native villages struggling to preserve way of life offer…

first_imgAlaska Native villages struggling to preserve way of life offer warm welcome to Episcopal bishops The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (4) Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Keith Gardner says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Environment & Climate Change, Rev Judy Hoover says: September 26, 2017 at 2:47 pm A good time was had by all. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Richard Basta says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab House of Bishops, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN September 26, 2017 at 4:02 pm This was incredible time in Alaska. The trips to the villages ( Tom (VT) and I flew to Nenana) with about 8 others) we were warmly and sincerely welcomed. It was indeed a privilege to visit with the people. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY House of Bishops Fall 2017, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET September 26, 2017 at 2:16 pm I’m moved with the love that was so present in the bishops visits. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal bishops and residents of Venetie, Alaska, gather Sept. 23 at the bank of the Chandalar River to bless the water, land and people. Venetie was one of eight villages in Interior Alaska visited by different groups of bishops, who are attending the fall House of Bishops meeting in Fairbanks. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Fairbanks, Alaska] Sunrise in Fairbanks was 7:40 a.m. on Sept. 23, but Diocese of Alaska Bishop Mark Lattime had a nonnegotiable command for his fellow bishops: Don’t be late.They weren’t. Beating the sun by 10 minutes, they boarded the bus for the airport at 7:30 a.m. sharp, bringing with them their rochets and chimeres, their boxes of food to give to the villagers they were to meet, and their personal expectations for what awaited them in Alaska’s northern Interior.Bishop Prince Singh of the Diocese of Rochester in New York was in good spirits on the bus. Some of his thoughts turned to his previous missionary work in a poor region of southern India. His group of bishops was headed this day for Arctic Village, where families of Native Alaskans on the edge of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge still survive largely on hunting and fishing.At the airport office of Northern Alaska Tour Company and Arctic Air, Bishop Greg Brewer of the Diocese of Central Florida took his turn as the bishops placed their travel bags on a scale to be weighed: a five-pound backpack here, a 10-pound duffel there.Precise weight measurements are crucial in small planes like these, an experience that reminded Brewer of traveling about a decade ago on similar flights in Uganda when visiting a partner diocese. Now Brewer was one of six bishops flying to the village of Allakaket on Day 3 of the Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops meeting.An emphasis on creation care and racial justice at this fall’s House of Bishops meeting made Alaska the perfect laboratory, Lattime told Episcopal News Service earlier in the week. And in the Alaskan lab, the central catalyst for the bishops’ reactions was this day of travel, including eight trips to Interior villages. A ninth group drove to a former gold mining site, and other bishops remained in Fairbanks for a procession along the Chena River.In the 2 p.m. hour, the bishops at all 10 locations were to bless the land, water and people. Episcopalians across the Alaska diocese had been asked to participate at the same time in their local congregations.“The idea of having, all across the state of Alaska, this blessing at 2 o’clock is powerful,” Lattime had told the bishops a day earlier as they discussed ways environmental justice is interwoven with the plight of indigenous people, especially those suffering the effects of climate change.But what can a delegation of bishops do for the residents of a struggling Alaska Native village? Lattime assured the bishops they bring gifts of faith.“You are bishops of the church. You are the symbols of the unity of the church. You connect these people with your people,” Lattime said. “You have been given the gift of the Holy Spirit, and you bring the ability to connect people in prayer and offer your blessing.”The bishops carried those words of encouragement with them to the airport the next morning. Bishop Mariann Budde of the Diocese of Washington studied a map of Alaska as she prepared to leave for Huslia. She said she hoped the bishops’ visit would be worthwhile for the village residents, and that she would be able to open herself fully to hearing their stories.Bishop Dorsey McConnell of the Diocese of Pittsburgh had packed a tangible offering: a bottle of water taken from the Conemaugh River, which flooded Johnstown, Pennsylvania in 1889. He planned to dump the water into the Yukon River as a symbol of recovery as his group offered blessings in Eagle, a village that suffered its own devastating flood in 2009.The sun was now illuminating the edges of the gray clouds. Pilots flying into the Interior pay close attention to a condition they call “having weather.”“We don’t really have weather in Venetie,” means the clouds have lifted enough to allow takeoff and landing there.Guest services representative Katie Tasky stood on a bench and gave the bishops a final rundown of what to expect on the twin-engine Piper Navajo Chieftain planes, which had enough room for a pilot and nine passengers.“Window and aisle seat, everyone gets one,” she said.Another employee called for the first group of Episcopal travelers: “Arctic Village!” The bishops and spouses boarded their plane and were in the air by 9:05 a.m.Pilot Bill Thompson takes Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas’ bag before leaving on a flight to Venetie, Alaska, on Sept. 23. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceBill Thompson, the pilot for the group heading to Venetie, offered his co-pilot seat to any interested passenger. Retired Bishop Neff Powell of the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia volunteered.“Hop in and do that important preflight checklist for me,” Thompson joked.With six bishops, two spouses and a reporter buckled in and wearing their headsets, Thompson maneuvered the plane behind the others in line at the start of the runway, an unusually busy day for Arctic Air. “You guys have certainly cleared out our ramp today,” Thompson said.Two planes were ahead. Then one. At 9:40 a.m., with the Venetie flight cleared for takeoff, the plane buzzed down the runway and began soaring over Fairbanks, charting a path north.‘A wonderful, wonderful way of life’The bishops were welcomed warmly in Alaska even before boarding flights to the Interior. Elders and leaders of local Native organizations addressed the House of Bishops on Sept. 22 at sessions that focused on Native culture and environmental threats to a way of life that has been followed here for thousands of years.Poldine Carlo, a founder of the Fairbanks Native Association, shares stories of growing up in the Interior with bishops gathered in Fairbanks on Sept. 22. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“We didn’t get rich, but we had a good life,” Poldine Carlo, 96, said as she detailed some of that life for the bishops at the Westmark Fairbanks Hotel and Convention Center.Carlo is best known as one of the founders of the Fairbanks Native Association, a support group created in the 1960s at a time when Alaska Natives faced open discrimination. But what resonated most with the bishops were her stories of living off the land in and around Nulato, where she grew up.As she spoke of her tribe’s fish camp and of animal tracking with her family, there was an audible ache of nostalgia in her voice – knowing part of that way is forever gone, and what’s left of it also may disappear.“It was such a wonderful, wonderful way of life,” Carlo said. “To think, at the time I was home, I never, ever thought there would be an end to that.”Hunting, fishing and trapping continue in the Interior, but Native communities that pride themselves on their subsistence lifestyle find it increasingly difficult to provide for themselves in the old ways.“Alaska is probably one of the last places on Earth where native people are still rooted to the land. We live off the fruits of the good Earth,” said the Rev. Shirley Lee, executive director of the Tanana Chiefs Conference’s Housing First program and a priest at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Fairbanks.For every food there is a season, she said: from moose to caribou, fish to berries. “And when we move away from those seasonal practices and rely on the local grocery store,” Lee said, “it deadens our spirit.”The changing environment is one factor in that cultural decline.“Right now the changes we’re seeing in our climate, we have to address it. … It’s very noticeable up here,” Bernadette Demientieff of the conservationist Gwich’in Steering Committee told the bishops. “Our elders and our leaders are at a point where they’re taking it up on their own because no one else is listening.”The Episcopal Church has long joined in that activism, and its Episcopal Public Policy Network has specifically supported the efforts of Demientieff and other Gwich’in activists in their fighting to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from proposals to allow oil drilling there. The north coast of Alaska, part of which the refuge encompasses, is a major caribou birthing ground and considered sacred land by Alaska Natives who hunt the caribou when the herd migrates deeper into the Interior.“This issue really is symbolic of how we are going to treat our remaining intact ecosystems on the planet,” Princess Johnson told the bishops. Johnson was part of an Episcopal Church delegation that traveled to Paris for the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, and she is a leader in the grassroots group Fairbanks Climate Action Coalition.“You cannot really separate environment from social justice issues. We really need to be mindful of that,” Johnson said. “I really honestly believe we’re all here on this planet for a reason right now and are being spiritually called upon to act.”The Rev. Shirley Lee addresses the House of Bishops on Sept. 22 in Fairbanks. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe Alaska Natives thanked the bishops for traveling to Alaska and listening to their concerns. Lee asked the bishops, as they prepared to travel across the Interior, not to see that vast landscape as barren, undeveloped property.“Look at that and remember there is a history behind every inch of land that you are traversing,” she said, “that history of the Native people here, and how your blessing will help further the preservation of our culture.”Village welcomes visiting bishopsThompson, the Arctic Air pilot on the flight to Venetie, was not at first fully aware of the nature of his cargo. Bishops on an Interior expedition were something novel.Realizing his passengers were flying over unfamiliar terrain, Thompson, 47, gladly played the tour guide. A 26-year veteran of the Alaskan skies, he pointed out the Fort Knox gold mine, which still operates just north of Fairbanks. He described how the Tanana and Yukon rivers, carrying glacial silt, had created wide flood plains over thousands of years. He identified the snow-dusted peaks below as the White Mountains, a jagged range dwarfed to the south by the Alaska Range, its towering Denali hidden in the clouds this morning.“We have the Fort Yukon weather,” Thompson radioed back to the control tower.He began dropping the plane to 4,000 feet to fly below the thick layer of clouds hovering above that village. The Yukon River appeared below. The arbitrary dotted line of the Arctic Circle receded behind them. A moose was spotted wading in a marsh on the edge of a lake.The village of Venetie, Alaska, is seen from above. The dirt strip in the center of the village is the former runway. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAs they approached Venetie, Thompson circled the plane over the village and the Chandalar River so he could point out the old dirt runway in the center of the village and the large school building. About 200 people are estimated to live in Venetie, most of them in small log homes built on dirt and gravel roads stretching out from the village’s center.Mildred Killbear, center left, and Eunice Williams greet the bishops after their landing in Venetie on Sept. 23. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAfter landing on the gravel surface of the newer runway just before 11 a.m., Thompson taxied to the spot where a group of villagers in pickup trucks and on all-terrain vehicles were waiting to greet the bishops with a round of handshakes and hugs.Mildred Killbear and Eunice Williams escorted the visitors to the center of the village, a few minutes away by pickup truck.Killbear, 68, was born in Fort Yukon and lived in Arctic Village as a child before moving with her parents to Venetie. “I’ve lived here all my life,” she said.Williams, at 80, is one of 20 village elders whose pictures hang in a display case inside the school building. “We’re still living in the old cultural way. We still depend on the subsistence lifestyle,” she said.Of the 20 elders honored in the display, she is among the few still alive.Eunice Williams and the Rev. Margo Simple show the bishops Venetie’s school. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAt the school, they met the Rev. Margo Simple, the Episcopal priest in Venetie who also works as a community health aide. Simple gave the bishops and spouses a tour of the building, as she and other village residents thanked them for coming.“Pray for us and the land and the animals,” Williams said.Myra Thumma was preparing a caribou meat feast for the bishops at Venetie’s community hall, a short walk from the school. The group made its way over to the small, one-room building, where residents greeted them with conversations about the hall’s wood-burning stove, about the villagers’ families and about the many ways of eating salmon, from burgers to salads. The bishops presented gifts of food – a large box filled with eggs, fruit, Nutri-Grain bars and other items that otherwise would command high prices at the village store.“This is the first time we’ve had so many bishops in one building,” Eddie Frank said. He, too, thanked them for coming.Frank, 67, is a formal tribal administrator who now works on the village’s roads. “We don’t call them roads, we call them trails,” he corrected. He also is known for his skills at trapping wolf, mink, lynx, marten, fox and any other animal popular for its skin and fur.Milder, shorter winters have made trapping more difficult, Frank said. Dog sledding and other winter travel depend on adequate snow cover, and he thinks the animals are more easily scared away by humans’ scent in the warmer air.“The weather has really changed,” Frank said.Myra Thumma points out the caribou meal that was prepared for the visiting bishops at the Venetie community hall. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThumma also worries about the effects of climate change. It has affected caribou migration patterns, she said.She attended college in the southeast Alaska city of Sitka, and she met her husband in Fairbanks, but eventually she had to get back to her home village.“I can’t live in the city,” Thumma said. Venetie is “the only life I know. This is part of me.”By 1:45 p.m., Simple had led the bishops to Good Shepherd Episcopal Church for the afternoon’s liturgy. A wood stove warmed the inside of the log church as a handful of villagers gathered in the pews for the short service.Afterward, the bishops in their rochets and chimeres processed out the front door following a 9-year-old girl who held high a wooden cross. They made their way down to the river, a young boy sprinting ahead of them.Under gray skies and the hazy afternoon sun, the bishops offered their blessings and thanks, for the river and land, for the moose and caribou, for the boats moored on the riverbank, for the village elders and leaders. They offered prayers for young people suffering from addiction, another threat to the village’s way of life.When it was over, the visitors and their hosts gathered for group photos, a family of worshipers bound by faith.To Nenana for a potlatchA day later, members of that faith family filled the community hall in Nenana, Alaska, nearly to capacity.Nenana is a village a 55-mile drive southwest of Fairbanks. The Episcopal Church was once the only Christian denomination with a presence in the Interior, and its history in Nenana dates to 1905 and the mission church of St. Mark’s.On Sept. 24, after splitting up in the morning to attend Sunday worship services in Fairbanks, North Pole and Nenana, the bishops joined together again in Nenana to attend the afternoon potlatch prepared by the St. Mark’s congregation and the village’s Native community.A potlatch is a Native Alaskan ceremonial meal featuring traditional food, drumming and dancing. This was a meal to leave no one hungry: moose meat, moose soup, garden salad, pasta salad, potato salad, fry bread, rolls, tea and dessert. Helping after helping was served up and down the long rows of bishops and residents who were seated in front of the makeshift paper tablecloth placed on the floor at their feet.The bishops, their spouses and residents of the Nenana area prepare for a potlatch feast Sept. 24. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAs the dinner wound down, several bishops and Native leaders spoke to the crowd, expressing mutual gratitude for the experience of this “good-time” potlatch.“I’m extremely blessed tonight to see the bishops in Alaska,” said Bessie Titus, a longtime Alaska deputy of the Episcopal Church’s General Convention. It’s a great honor, she said, “to us as a diocese, to us as a Native community.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry offered Nenana the blessing of the Episcopal Church and received a roar of approval with his heartfelt “thank you,” which he repeated over and over.Lattime called himself “probably the most blessed in this place” because his family of bishops was getting a chance to meet the family of Alaskans that has adopted him.The Rev. Trimble Gilbert speaks at the Nenana potlatch. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“This is what the love of Christ is all about,” he said. “This is what becoming the body of Christ is all about.”The Rev. Trimble Gilbert, an Arctic Village priest and prominent Gwich’in community leader, echoed others in marveling at the hundreds of people who had gathered for the day’s potlatch.“In Nenana, we honor you,” he said, before explaining that the potlatch represents his tribe’s values, its commitment to taking care of each other. Like the hunting traditions that provided moose for the meal, the potlatch follows the ways of their ancestors.“We honor them for us to be here,” he said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service September 26, 2017 at 7:54 am I know many bishops attended but would love to see a list of those who were there. Thank you for this fine article. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Racial Justice & Reconciliation By David PaulsenPosted Sep 25, 2017 Ann Ely says: Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Historic American-Scottish roots celebrated through Presiding Bishop’s visit to Aberdeen

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 6, 2017 Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Historic American-Scottish roots celebrated through Presiding Bishop’s visit to Aberdeen Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The ornate crests of the American states on the ceiling in the nave of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in Aberdeen, Scotland, symbolize the deep connection between the Scottish and U.S.-based Episcopal churches. Photo: Matthew Davies/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Aberdeen, Scotland] Ornate crests of the American states decorate the ceiling of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in Aberdeen, Scotland. It’s a reminder of the critical role the U.S.-based Episcopal Church played in laying the groundwork for global Anglicanism when it sent Samuel Seabury to the British Isles in 1784 to be consecrated as its first bishop.Faced with an unworkable condition from the Church of England calling for Seabury to swear allegiance to the crown, he traveled to Aberdeen where three Scottish bishops agreed to consecrate him in return for promoting the Scottish Prayer Book liturgy back on American soil.More than 230 years later, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry arrived in Aberdeen for a four-day visit to Scotland to recognize the importance of that significant moment in history and to celebrate the partnership that has flourished between the two provinces ever since. Curry is accompanied by Executive Assistant Sharon Jones and the Rev. Chuck Robertson, canon for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church, who was installed on Nov. 5 as an honorary canon of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in Aberdeen during a Festal Evensong. Curry preached during the service.“Our bishops today trace their succession to Samuel Seabury … so our roots really are here in Aberdeen, Scotland,” Curry told Episcopal News Service on Nov. 6 before joining a symposium exploring the social history and common interests of the Scottish and U.S.-based Episcopal churches. “Indeed, Scotland is our mother church, so it was good to come home and give thanks to our mother church and to affirm our continued partnership in Jesus Christ.”Curry’s reference to coming home was mutually acknowledged by his Scottish hosts as he was invited during a post-service reception to cut a cake iced with the words “Welcome Home.” The delegation was then furnished with gifts of Scotch whisky and porridge stirrers, representing perhaps two longstanding staples in the Scottish diet.The Most Rev. Mark Strange, bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness and primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, said that the Scottish Episcopal Church “is proud of its role in the coming into being of what is now the worldwide Anglican Communion, and I am delighted to welcome the presiding bishop in his first visit to Scotland when we can share our past, present and future bonds of communion and concern for the people we serve in our respective provinces.”Strange, who as a young boy sang in the choir at St. Andrew’s Cathedral, told ENS that for as long as he can remember “there has been a close link with America. Last night, I had the real pleasure of installing Chuck Robertson as a canon. I’ve watched canons from America being installed my whole life. And there’s a sense in which when I am in North America, this is home.“For the Scottish Episcopal Church, just having the knowledge that somehow we are connected … means that we are more outward-looking than inward-looking.”The historic bond that St. Andrew’s Cathedral shares with the Episcopal Church includes an invitation for the presiding bishop to nominate someone to be installed as an honorary canon.“Their affection for our church and our affection for the Scottish Episcopal Church is longstanding and deep,” said Curry. “And now we must take that affection into concrete work that helps to change the world into something akin to God’s dream for it, and so Canon Robertson being made an honorary canon was a symbolic way of incarnating that in a human person.”Meanwhile, the Very Rev. Isaac Poobalan, cathedral provost, hopes the visit will raise further awareness of the role that the cathedral plays in the community of Aberdeen’s city center and beyond.When Seabury reached London back in 1784, bishops in the Church of England thwarted his mission to the episcopate. The English church, standing firm in its post-Reformation ideals, insisted he swear an oath of allegiance to the king. Such an oath would have contravened America’s Declaration of Independence, and with the colonies having won the war of independence one year earlier, Seabury was wise to decline.Instead, he took to the road, traveling 400 miles north to Scotland. There, the Episcopal Church in Aberdeen and Orkney willingly assisted with his consecration, and with a more workable condition – that he promote the Scottish Prayer Book upon returning home.St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Aberdeen, Scotland, holds a special place in the legacies of both the U.S.-based Episcopal Church and the Scottish Episcopal Church. Photo: Matthew Davies/Episcopal News ServiceThis milestone is often heralded as the main catalyst, if not the onset, of what eventually would become known as the Anglican Communion. The relationship between the U.S.-based Episcopal Church and the Scottish Episcopal Church has deepened and flourished over the more than two centuries since that momentous occasion, including through a close companion relationship between the Diocese of Connecticut and the Diocese of Aberdeen and Orkney.To this day, despite several prayer book revisions, the Rite I Eucharistic Prayer in the Episcopal Church’s Book of Common Prayer is strikingly similar to the same liturgy found in the Scottish Prayer Book.But Curry also noted that “the red, white and blue – and that particular shade of blue in the Episcopal Church flag – hail from Scotland. And indeed, our very name, the Episcopal Church, comes from the Scottish Episcopal Church. So, in those symbolic yet significant ways, there are ties that bind us. But I have a feeling there’s a deeper DNA. There’s kind of an American spirit that has a lot to do, I think, with the spirit of Scotland, and that sense of freedom and independence. That’s pretty American, and I have a feeling we get that from Scotland.”Samuel SeaburySeabury was born in Groton, Connecticut, and graduated from Yale College in 1748. He read theology under his father and then studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, 1752-1753. Seabury was ordained deacon on Dec. 21, 1753, and priest on Dec. 23, 1753, in England. He was a missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel at New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1754-1757, and rector at Jamaica, New York, 1757-1766.From 1766 to 1776 he served as rector of St. Peter’s Church, Westchester, New York, and from 1776 to 1783 he was in private medical practice and chaplain to British troops at Staten Island and New York. He wrote forceful pamphlets in defense of loyalty to the British Crown. On Mar. 25, 1783, he was elected bishop of Connecticut and was consecrated at Aberdeen, Scotland, Nov. 14, 1784, by three nonjuring bishops of the Scottish Episcopal Church.He also served as bishop of Rhode Island from 1790 to1796 and as presiding bishop from 1789 to 1792. He was a high churchman in the tradition of the nonjurors and the Caroline Divines. A valid episcopacy and the threefold orders of clergy were central concerns for him. He died in 1796 in New London, Connecticut. Seabury and the passing of the episcopate to the Episcopal Church are commemorated on Nov. 14 in the Episcopal calendar of the church year.In the decades following Seabury’s death, the communion grew geographically and numerically, largely through the missionary movement, and many more-complex cultural and contextual issues came into play. Other than in its prayer book, the Anglican Communion staved off making any foundational declaration until the 1888 Lambeth Conference endorsed the Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral, originally adopted by the Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops in 1886.The Quadrilateral named four principles of Anglicanism: the Holy Scriptures, as containing all things necessary to salvation; the creeds – specifically the Apostles’ and Nicene creeds – as the sufficient statement of Christian faith; the sacraments of baptism and Holy Communion; and the historic episcopate, locally adapted. (A U.S. Episcopal priest, William Reed Huntington, is credited with proposing the four elements in an 1870 essay.)Today, the communion encompasses 39 autonomous provinces with some 80 million Anglicans in 165 countries worldwide. But it’s anyone’s guess what the landscape of the Anglican Communion would look like in 2017 had Seabury not ventured to Scotland in search of his episcopal consecration.But the path of the Anglican Communion has been far from smooth at times, with the spotlight over recent decades highlighting the differences over biblical interpretation concerning women’s ordination and human sexuality issues. To date, the Scottish and U.S.-based churches are the only provinces to have voted to remove from their canons the definition that marriage is between a man and a woman, thus enabling gay and lesbian Christians to be married in church.“The Anglican Communion has its difficulties, has its concerns, and we need to find ways of working together so that when we really get down to issues, we know that the issues we are talking about are the ones that concern us for the world,” said Strange. “For a small church like ours to be able to be a part of a larger institution is always important. … I am looking forward to maintaining what is clearly already a loving relationship and to finding ways to build on that.”Curry agreed, saying, “We are not isolated, disparate individuals. We are part of a greater whole. Dr. Martin Luther King said we are tied in networks of mutuality in a single garment of destiny. The truth is we are interconnected, we are interrelated, and the more we use our interconnectedness and our relationships for the good, the better off the whole world is.”– Matthew Davies is advertising and web manager for the Episcopal News Service. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

NYC Episcopal churches call for increased mental health crisis training…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL February 3, 2018 at 9:23 pm I agree whole-heartedly that the Episcopal Church (TEC) needs to do more about mental illness. At the last General Convention (GC), I authored a resolution that TEC be more proactive in addressing the needs of people with mental illness and their families. I hope to help pass a follow-up resolution at this year’s GC that will form a mental health task force to further TEC’s commitment to those with mental illness. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY February 1, 2018 at 9:52 am This story is heartbreaking. As a rector in an urban church next to a large state university we host folks besieged with debilitating mental illness on a daily basis, several of whom are members. We would be devastated to lose any one of us to police violence because of course we are all “family”. I think ALL of us in church need more training in descalating mental health crisis because the church is still a place where people in need seek out help. We are “first responders”, too. This story is a wake up call for me. I imagine staff in public libraries are better trained than your average Episcopal clergy like me. Time to change that. I’m on it! Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN February 4, 2018 at 3:17 pm This just reminds me of how blessed I am as a professional diagnosed with a mental illness. Two years ago, I had a spychotic break and I was informed that the cops were called and I was transported in an ambulance to the hospital. I spent a week there. Imagine. This could have been me. I am truly impressed and grateful to see the Church community’s support. God bless you and protect you. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group NYC Episcopal churches call for increased mental health crisis training after parishioner’s shooting death by police Church members watch as NYPD Sgt. Hugh Barry sits on trial for the killing of Deborah Danner Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Stellae Maris says: January 31, 2018 at 11:46 pm As a member of NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness) in CT and Manchester I have learned through NAMI and our local police about the importance of having Police,Fire,EMTs and other first responders being trained in CRISIS INTERVENTION. It should be mandatory not optional. Lives are at stake . Let us erase the stigma around mental illness and become educated and advocates for the mentally ill.I applaud the NY churches who are standing up for Deborah Danner. What a beautiful woman and one who shared her talents. She didn’t choose to be ill . She is a human being.. our neighbor and we are taught to love our neighbor. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rev. Dn. Karen Fedorchak says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls [Episcopal News Service] Deborah Danner didn’t have to die.In October 2016, the Episcopalian had a psychotic episode at her Bronx, New York, apartment. It wasn’t the first time that police responded to a disturbance complaint about Danner, who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia decades ago. In the past, 911 calls resulted in Danner taking a trip to the hospital, returning home stabilized.This time, however, gunshots rang out. And Danner, 66, was gone.New York Police Department Sgt. Hugh Barry was charged with murder and manslaughter because prosecutors say he didn’t have a reasonable threat to his life and wasn’t following police protocol. His trial began Jan. 30, more than a year later. After a one-day break, the trial is expected to resume Feb. 1.Deborah DannerEpiscopal church members plan to be in the courtroom every day in a show of support, said the Rev. Matthew Heyd, rector of the Episcopal Church of the Heavenly Rest in Manhattan. He knew Danner for the last 10 years.On that first day in the courtroom, about 35 parishioners from Manhattan churches, including Church of the Heavenly Rest, Trinity Church Wall Street, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Harlem, and the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, marched to the Bronx courthouse. Danner attended all those churches at one time or another.“It’s hard because the trial is about tragedy, both the tragedy of her killing and the tragedy of mental illness being unaddressed,” Heyd told Episcopal News Service. “And it’s hopeful, because the church is organizing, both to recognize the dignity of her life and to respond and give meaning to her struggle and to support others who are struggling with mental illness also.”Parishioners and clergy were also there to bring home the point that law enforcement officers, in New York and nationwide, need much more training in handling mental health crises. New York officers can take Crisis Intervention Team training, but fewer than a quarter of the force has. It’s not required.In 2016, NYPD received approximately 157,000 calls involving people in mental crisis, according to the city inspector general’s January report reviewing how the NYPD handles interactions with people in mental crisis.That’s about 430 mental crisis calls a day.“How many times a day is an officer at a door and doesn’t know what’s going on inside and how to handle it?” Heyd asked. “However the trial turns out, the need for more skill and support in this is abundantly clear.”Nationwide, police officers in 2015 shot and killed 251 people who had exhibited signs of mental illness — a quarter of all the people shot and killed by police that year, the report stated. Alternatively, the Federal Bureau of Investigation discovered that 1,710 law enforcement officers nationwide were assaulted while handling people with mental illness, and two officers were killed while doing so.“We share your conviction that Deborah’s death was a tragedy that should have been prevented,” the Rt. Rev. Andrew M. L. Dietsche, bishop of the Diocese of New York, wrote in a Jan. 18 letter to New York Mayor Bill de Blasio. “And we believe that Crisis Intervention [Team] training for this officer and for his fellow officers could have saved Deborah’s life.”Diocesan representatives are calling to meet with the mayor, as well as police, to discuss this mental health crisis issue.The Rev. Winnie Varghese, priest and director of justice and reconciliation at Trinity Church Wall Street, also attended Barry’s criminal trial Jan. 30. Churches across the United States regularly minister to people who have mental illness, and often come upon people in a state of crisis who need professionals to help de-escalate the situation, she said.“Until we have a better health system in New York, our police are our front line for mental health emergencies; if people are trained correctly, we can solve this,” Varghese told ENS. “These folks aren’t committing a crime; they’re sick. It puts police officers in a horrible position, and it puts people who are ill in a horrible position. It makes everyone vulnerable.”“This isn’t about vengeance. It’s about how do we change this situation,” she said.Varghese and Heyd said the church can’t handle the problem alone. Increased police training makes the most sense. It’s a cause they’re fighting for so that they don’t lose more parishioners this way.Heyd knew Danner pretty well while she attended both Heavenly Rest and Trinity.“She knit baby blankets for both my children,” Heyd said. “She was really smart and kind, and she struggled. All of that was evident to people who knew her.”– Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] February 1, 2018 at 9:06 am Well said. My wife and I are also members and contributors to NAMI, which deserves more support for its work towards public awareness that mental or emotional instability can be a disability just as incapacitating as a physical impairment. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Becky Michelfelder says: Rector Shreveport, LA By Amy SowderPosted Jan 31, 2018 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Susan Phillips, Deacon says: Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL mike geibel says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (5) Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Liturgy and Music committee recommends against revising the Hymnal 1982

first_img March 5, 2018 at 4:12 pm Why not let every congregation do whatever it wants? By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 5, 2018 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Tags March 6, 2018 at 12:01 am I remember the days when you could walk into any Episcopal church and the service was familiar and easy to follow. That is no longer true. Different lessons, different formats, not even sure if it is a Prayer Book liturgy. Makes me long for the seriousness of the 1928 Book of Common Prayer. Although I once thought the new Book was an improvement, I know think it has allowed sloppiness and confusion in our worship. Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC General Convention 2018, Kathy Franklin says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Very Rev. Thomas J Hurley says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events March 7, 2018 at 12:16 pm I don’t know the reason to tackle the 1982 Hymnal before the 1979 Prayer Book. The former is infinitely better than the latter, although the front-of-the-book placement of liturgical music is contrary to expectations since only the choir sings the sursum corda, etc. There are many problems with the Rite I-Rite II divide, not least the Rite II iteration of the Nicene Creed. I have a hard time saying “we believe,” because I honestly have no idea how the other worshipers believe. I further have problems with the “visible/invisible” v. “seen and unseen” differentiation between that which was created. The former is objective; the latter subjective. Try saying the Rite I iteration during a Rite II service and you may be scolded if not asked to take your worship elsewhere. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY March 6, 2018 at 3:04 am 1982 Hymnal has a lot of dead wood. The BCP should be the common prayer book for the Church’s usual services, and doesn’t have to reflect smaller groups’ interest in “fine-tuning” language. If an individual congregation chooses to use some of these “updated” usages, it should be a matter for that congregation only. Every parish has differences in its make-up, such as age, cultural heritage, and custom. These can be respected without making wholesale changes to the Book of COMMON prayer! Thank you Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK March 7, 2018 at 3:15 am I have to say that worshipping in Europe with the Church of England resources, I think that ECUSA is not thinking broad enough over the next revisions. I would work with Anglican Church of Canada and Church of England on a broader Book of Common Prayer revisions that can be contextualize for local resources. I hope that FORWARD MOVEMENT would produce trial resources that could be used. By now, I would have hoped that there would have been a second trial liturgy being used in churches before a major Prayer Book revisions.Finally, whether you like it or not, a lot of non-ECUSA Anglicans in the US use the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. If ecumenism and church unity are important, I would like to see them engaged. Comments (6) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ General Convention, The Standing Committee on Liturgy and Music is recommending to the General Convention that it not authorize a revision of the Hymnal 1982. The committee did propose a revised and expanded collection of rites for the pastoral and liturgical needs of congregations. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] While the prospect of revising the Book of Common Prayer looms large over the upcoming General Convention, the Standing Committee on Liturgy and Music has also considered a number of other parts of the Episcopal Church’s worship life.The SCLM’s entire report is posted here. Episcopal News Service has written about the committee’s invitation to the church to consider how to revise the prayer book, and it has written about the committee’s proposed remedy to what it calls a “situation of great confusion” over the church’s calendar of saints.Below is a summary of the rest the SCLM’s work and recommendations.“I am exceedingly proud of the SCLM’s work this past triennium. Because the projects we received were mostly unfunded, the SCLM chose the scope of our work very carefully,” the Rev. Devon Anderson, SCLM’s chair, told Episcopal News Service. “We were determined to send complete, thoughtful and quality work back to General Convention. But more importantly, we were unified in our desire to serve as faithful stewards of the gift and tradition of our liturgy.”Book of Occasional ServicesConvention told the SCLM to continue its multitriennium project of revising the 2003 edition of this collection of optional services and texts that are available for “occasional” pastoral and liturgical needs of congregations. The book includes church-year-specific things such as seasonal blessings, a Christmas Festival of Lessons and Music, and a service for All Hallows’ Eve. The committee has prepared a revision that modernizes “archaic language” and adds new material, some of it at the specific direction of convention, including rites for changing one’s name and honoring God in creation. It also includes the outline of a rite for Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead with the hope that local communities will flesh it out. The entire proposed revision is included in the SCLM’s report and can be found here.Racial reconciliationPart of General Convention Resolution A182, which called on the church to address systemic racism, asked the SCLM to produce and post online a set of prayers for racial reconciliation and justice, suitable for inclusion in the Prayers of the People. A subcommittee created four sets of Prayers of the People and a Litany of Repentance and Commissioning for the Ministry of Justice and Reconciliation.MarriageThe 78th General Convention, meeting in July 2015, changed the canonical language that defines marriage as being between a man and a woman (Resolution A036) and authorized two new marriage rites with language allowing them to be used by same-sex or opposite-sex couples (Resolution A054).Convention charged the SCLM with monitoring the use of those rites, formally known as “Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing, Revised and Expanded 2015.” The committee’s churchwide survey on the rites gathered 260 replies, and of those who said they have read or used the rites, just more than 50 percent ranked them as excellent, according to the SCLM’s report to convention.After reviewing the survey results and discussing possible responses in its report, the SCLM said it thinks the rites “will continue to serve the church well in its current edition and does not recommend a further revision at this time.” It recommended to convention that the rites remain in trial use until General Convention initiates a comprehensive revision of the Book of Common Prayer.Meanwhile, a separate group, the General Convention Task Force on the Study of Marriage, has said its Blue Book report will call for continued trial use of the rites as “additions to the Book of Common Prayer” with three options. The task force will call for amendments to the rites, prefaces, and appropriate sections of the Catechism to make the language gender-neutral (i.e., “the couple”) rather than specific to a man and a woman.The three options include continuing trial use of the rites amended as the task force recommends, adopting them at the 2021 meeting of General Convention as part of the prayer book, or having that meeting of convention take some other action.Changes to the Book of Common Prayer constitute constitutional changes and, thus, require the approval of two successive meetings of General Convention.Hymnal revisionThe committee said it “declined to act” on Resolution 2015-D060, which directed it to prepare a plan for the comprehensive revision of the Hymnal 1982. The members based their decision on the fact that they found no historical precedent in the Episcopal Church for a hymnal to be revised prior to a revision of the Book of Common Prayer. “The SCLM would like General Convention to make decisions regarding whether or not to revise the 1979 Book of Common Prayer before any further decisions are made regarding revision of the Hymnal 1982,” the members wrote in their report.The committee also reviewed The Hymnal Revision Feasibility Study produced in 2012 by the Church Pension Group. Close to 13,000 people filled out a lengthy survey on the hymnal and the results, the authors said, showed the centrality of the hymnal to the life of the Episcopal Church. While saying their survey was not a red light to revision, the authors called for “caution before a decision is taken to go full speed ahead.”And, the SCLM notes, the convention gave it no money to spend on devising a plan for hymnal revision.Congregational Song Task ForceIn a related matter, Resolution 2015-A060 “empowered” the committee’s Congregational Song Task Force to “further the mission of the Episcopal Church by enlivening and invigorating congregational song through the development of a variety of musical resources” and to develop and expand the work begun in the World Music Project.The committee reported that it has developed a project to collect information from a sample of participants in each province of the church to discern which hymns and songs are being sung in parishes in the Episcopal Church. The committee calls it “a necessary preliminary step in developing further resources for congregational song.” The task force plans to convene a symposium by the end of the 2018-2021 triennium to bring together at least one participant from each province to discuss the functions of the hymns and songs they use, and identify new sources for hymnody.The committee noted that it was given no money for this work but that it has applied for a $28,050 Constable Grant to fund this project.Canonical and constitutional changesThe committee said collaborated with the Standing Commission on Governance, Structure, Constitution and Canons to develop what it called “an appropriate constitutional and canonical ‘vessel’ for liturgies, apart from the Book of Common Prayer,” for General Convention to consider.It said convention has approved liturgies using a “trial use” designation added in 1964 as a way to introduce the church to new liturgical texts outside of the prayer book. However, the committee said, the use of that designation has gone beyond its intention and other monikers have also been created.The members proposed amending Article X of the church’s constitution and a parallel amendment to Canon II.3.6 to create a system to authorize additional and alternative texts to supplement the Book of Common Prayer.The constitutional change, which requires the approval of two successive conventions, would add a provision allowing the convention to “authorize for use throughout this church, as provided by canon, alternative and additional liturgies to supplement those provided in the Book of Common Prayer.”The canonical change would require that whenever General Convention uses the authority of the amended Article X to authorize alternative or additional liturgies, the enabling resolution must specify the precise texts thereof, and the terms and conditions under which such liturgies may be used.This new structure would “lend clear canonical status to worship materials already in use by the church as well as those approved in the future and maintain the integrity of theology and ecclesiology of the Book of Common Prayer.” The change is not intended to preempt or stop Prayer Book revision, the committee said. Instead, it said, it will give the church more flexibility in its approach to worship, and the General Convention a more transparent criterion for authorizing such worship.“We also see it as an exciting opportunity to engage in a discussion of how we are formed by the way in which we worship,” the committee added.In addition to these projects, the SCLM has made recommendations on the church’s calendar of saints. ENS coverage of that project is here.The SCLM is posting on its blog a series of essays about the various projects it worked on this triennium, and will host online discussions there. Those essays include one titled “A better way to authorize liturgical texts.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Liturgy and Music committee recommends against revising the Hymnal 1982 General Convention report includes revised Book of Occasional Services, new prayers for racial reconciliation March 5, 2018 at 6:23 pm I’m grateful to the Standing Committee on Liturgy and Music for this work. While I know we can always pray to God in our own words, one of the wonderful things our tradition is the inspiration and unity we can find through common prayer. I look forward to sharing the committee’s effort on the subject of racial reconciliation with those of other traditions I work with in this field. Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Susan M. Paynter says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Liturgy & Music David G. Duggan says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Alexander Scott says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Jeffrey Cox says: Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

Environment Network calls on Anglicans around the world to use…

first_img Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Environment Network calls on Anglicans around the world to use less plastic This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Environment & Climate Change Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Communion’s Environment Network (ACEN) is encouraging Anglicans to reduce their use of plastic in Lent. Organizers hope that those taking part in the “plastic fast” will learn to use less plastic in the longer term in order to protect the earth’s environment. The Environmental Co-ordinator for the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, Canon Rachel Mash, said that that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the oceans than fish. “Plastic is already entering into our drinking water”, she said. “Plastic clogs our rivers, leaches into our soil and is one of the greatest challenges the planet faces.”Read the entire article here. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Mar 8, 2019 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Self Help Credit Union breaks ground on new branch in Apopka

first_img 3 COMMENTS Reply […] Source link […] UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Reply Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. March 23, 2018 at 8:08 pm Self Help Credit Union breaks ground on new branch in Apopka – Self Success Tips Mama Mia TAGSSelf-Help Federal Credit Union Previous articleWith Surgery, Tiger Woods is “Back” on TrackNext articleLegislators Bracy, Brown and Sullivan coming to Apopka in April Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter On the corner of US-441 and Cabell Lane is a vacant lot with a little slice of nature and a small hill in the midst of a lot of cement, streets, and businesses on its way to the 415. There used to be a Jamaican restaurant there, but now it’s going to be home to the hopes, dreams, and economic opportunity for underprivileged communities in Apopka. Yesterday, the Self-Help Federal Credit Union, which Apopka’s Community Trust Federal Credit Union joined in 2016, broke ground on its new branch at 667 West Orange Blossom Trail. The new branch’s improved size and visibility (compared to the current location at 825 South Park Ave.) will help the credit union to more fully serve its members. Speakers at the groundbreaking included Apopka City Commissioner Diane Velazquez,  Apopka Area Chamber of Commerce President Robert Agrusa, Sister Ann Kendrick, a founder of Community Trust FCU, and Adelcio Lugo, Regional Branch Manager for Self-Help Credit Union.  “Breaking ground on this new branch is an important step in Self-Help’s work to build on Community Trust’s legacy with farmworkers and others in Apopka,” said Lugo. “Sister Ann and her sister’s work in helping provide financial services to those in need is truly inspirational and Self-Help is honored to help further that mission.” The groundbreaking marks a new chapter in transformative community work for Self-Help in Apopka and extends the Community Trust legacy of helping working families gain access to mainstream financial services. The full-service branch will ensure members use of state of the art banking technology, equipment, and convenient access. Community Trust merged with Self-Help in 2016, in order to extend additional products and services to Community Trust members, such as mortgages and online and mobile banking. It was formed in 1982 to serve Florida’s farmworker community by a coalition of local organizations and activists, including the Apopka nuns (members of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur), the West Orange Farmworker Health Association (Community Health Centers), Homes in Partnership, the Farmworker Ministry, the Justice and Peace Office, and the Farmworker Association of Florida. “Self-Help is an ideal merger partner for Community Trust,” said Kendrick. “They are strong and successful with a host of financial services for all people, with special care for people of color and working families. As part of Self-Help, we can not only provide good financial services but be part of a movement to protect vulnerable people from predatory lending and build economic power in low-income communities.”   Apopka is Self-Help’s first physical presence in Florida. Jax Metro Credit Union, founded in 1935 to serve utility and port workers of the City of Jacksonville, merged with Self-Help on June 1, 2017. Between the two mergers, Self-Help’s credit unions now serve over 6,000 members in Florida. Self-Help also has helped originate over $300 million in loans to Floridians, partnering with Florida banks to finance over 2,900 home loans and providing financing to high-performing public schools in Miami and Gainesville educating nearly 20,000 low-income children.The Self-Help family of non-profit organizations includes Self-Help Credit Union, serving 64,000 members with branches in North Carolina and Florida; Self-Help Federal Credit Union, serving over 70,000 members with branches in California, Chicago, Florida, and Milwaukee; Self-Help Ventures Fund, a national non-profit loan fund; and the Center for Responsible Lending, a policy and advocacy organization addressing abusive lending practices. Since its 1980 founding, Self-Help has provided over $7 billion in financing to 131,000 families, individuals and businesses underserved by traditional financial institutions. About Self-Help Self-Help is a community development financial institution headquartered in Durham, NC. Founded in 1980, Self-Help has provided over $7 billion in financing to 131,000 families, individuals and businesses underserved by traditional financial institutions. It helps drive economic development and strengthen communities by financing hundreds of homebuyers each year, as well as nonprofits, child care centers, community health facilities, public charter schools, and residential and commercial real estate projects. Self-Help’s two credit unions serve over 130,000 people in North Carolina, California, Chicago, Florida and Wisconsin and offer a full range of financial products and services. Learn more at www.self-help.org and www.self-helpfcu.org. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Self Help Credit Union breaks ground on new branch in Apopka – Instant Expert Success There are those gold painted shovels, like at the City of Apopka, that were used for the groundbreaking ceremonies, that later were handed down to the city’s construction crew employees to use for real, instead of “fake” digging….lol March 23, 2018 at 8:33 pm March 26, 2018 at 9:37 am Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Reply […] Source link […]last_img read more

Breaking: Zellwood girl missing

first_img The Anatomy of Fear She is a very pretty girl. I read her height 4′ 10″ and weight approx. 110 pounds on another news channel. That is very small. I hope they can find her soon, and that this ordeal ends well. It is frightening. Pray they find her soon, and that she is safely returned back home, and is not harmed. TAGSOrange County Sheriff’s Office Previous articleFlorida Hospital, like Apopka, transitioning from old to newNext articleErrol developers file plans with city Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! Missing Persons Alert14-year old Zellwood girl missing since Sunday nightFrom the Orange County Sheriff’s OfficeUPDATE: The Orange County Sheriff’s Office is now reporting that the missing teen has been located and returned home safe and sound. OCSO is thanking everyone who shared the Missing Persons Alert.Original Story:The Orange County Sheriff’s Office is on the lookout for a missing Zellwood girl.On April 2nd at 11:00 PM Jennifer Maldonado was last seen leaving the area of Holly Court in Zellwood, Florida. Jennifer is likely to be in the company of Williams Hernandez, a male approximately 45 years of age who is believed to be harboring her.Hernandez drives a Red/White 2001 Ford Mustang bearing FL tag 040WVM. Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact Orange County Sheriff’s Office at 407-836- HELP(4357). Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here April 5, 2017 at 5:39 pm April 4, 2017 at 12:01 am Mama Miacenter_img 2 COMMENTS LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Reply Reply So glad she has returned back home and is safe. Good news! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Mama Mia Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Winter is coming…

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter The wisdom of taking five… or tenInspirationBy Don LindseyWith school in full swing again and my parents finally moved in and settled, things have picked up in our household.  That’s been a good thing and we’re adjusting to our new schedules but as I settled in for bed the other night, I realized that I have been so busy that I haven’t taken enough time to enjoy all of the great things that are happening around me.  The more I thought about it, the more I kept remembering the voice of my brother Jimmy who loved to say “take five” when he would see someone that he felt needed a break from working hard.  He passed away in 2008 and while I miss my brother dearly, he left with me a lot of wonderful memories and a unique way of looking at things.  He seemed to know when to slow down and enjoy life and as I look back on my week, I see nothing but a blur.  I’m starting to think that “take five” is more than an expression but actually a solid piece of advice that I need to apply to my daily life.The biggest problem I am finding with applying that philosophy, is time.  Between running all day and keeping up with things around our house when I am home, by the time I finally slow down at night it’s time for bed.  My wife has been expressing the same concerns and as we were commiserating about this topic the other night, she made a suggestion about spending some time playing with our family’s new kitten.  I dismissed that thought at first.  But the next morning when I went into my son’s room to check on the little 8 week ball of fur, who we’ve named Winter, I immediately realized what she had meant.WinterAs soon as I walked into the room the kitten ran up to greet me.  Tiny meows and pawing at my pant leg gave me the urge to sit down and fawn over her.  After a few seconds of petting her and letting her chew on my hand, we began to play.  For about ten minutes I worked her toy on a string and laughed as she bounced around the room trying to catch it.  When I realized that I had spent so much time with her and still had a day to get to, I left and took care of the tasks that I had on my plate.  An hour or so later, I came back in to find her cuddled up in the middle of the floor sleeping.  Apparently our play session had worn her out and I sat down on the floor next to her to pet her.  She woke up enough to see that I had joined her and proceeded to crawl onto my lap to continue her nap.  I spent the next ten minutes petting her as she slept and realized that I still had more in my day to accomplish.  As the morning and afternoon moved on, I found this process repeating itself and I was walking in to see Winter about every hour for some time with her.  Every time I would leave the room I felt a little more energized and even more focused on whatever it was I needed to do.  When the day had ended and I was settling in for bed, this time I did not look back on my day and see a blur, I saw one that was productive and filled with a lot of good moments.  It seems as if my taking five, or ten in this case helped me slow down long enough to see the things I was missing before.I’m sure we’ve all heard how important it is to enjoy the joyful times we experience.  Busy schedules and hectic lives can make that hard to accomplish, but what I’m learning is that finding those few precious moments to unwind during the day greatly increases my overall happiness.  There are a lot of things around me that bring me joy.  My wife, children, friends, animals, music, video games, and the list goes on, so the next time I find my day going by too quickly or I am just frustrated by how it’s going, I am going to take my brother’s advice and take five….or ten.  It works. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Don Lindsey is a follower of Christ, son, husband, father, and a survivor.  Originally from Dayton Ohio, and resident of Apopka for six years, Don sees his life as a dedication to his wife, parents, children,and community. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your comment!center_img The Anatomy of Fear TAGSDon LindseyInspiration Previous articlePrayer can change the worldNext articleThe wisdom of Star Trek… Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Everything coming and going on Netflix in November

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here By Allison Foreman of Mashable Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Crown Season 3 begins streaming Nov. 17 on Netflix.MoviesA Holiday Engagement (11/4)A Single Man (11/11)Apache Warrior (11/1)Atlantics(11/29)Bikram: Yogi, Guru, Predator (11/20)Broken(11/27)Burning Cane (11/6)Christmas Break-In (11/1)Christmas Crush(11/4)Christmas in the Heartlands (11/1)Christmas Survival (11/1)Dear Santa (11/4)Dino Girl Gauko (11/22)District 9 (11/4)Dream/Killer (11/20)Drive (11/1)Earthquake Bird (11/15)Elliot the Littlest Reindeer (11/1)End of Watch(11/23)Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas(11/1)Fire in Paradise (11/1)Grease (11/1)Holiday in the Wild (11/1)Holiday Rush (11/28)Holly Star (11/1)House Arrest (11/15)How to Be a Latin Lover (11/1)I Lost My Body (11/29)Klaus(11/15)Let It Snow (11/8)Lorena, la de pies ligeros (11/20)Love Jones (11/1)Maradona in Mexico (11/13)Mon frère (11/22)No hay tiempo para la verguenza (11/19)Paid in Full(11/1)Paradise Beach(11/8)Rosemary’s Baby (11/1)Rounders(11/1)Santa Girl (11/1)Shadow (11/6)Shot Caller(11/24)Sling Blade (11/1)Spitfire: The Plane that Saved the World(11/1)Step Brothers(11/1)Suffragette (11/16)The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open(11/7)The Christmas Candle(11/1)The Devil Next Door (11/4)The Game (11/1)The Irishman (11/27)The King (11/1)The Knight Before Christmas (11/21)The Man Without Gravity (11/1)The Matrix (11/1)The Matrix Reloaded (11/1)The Matrix Revolutions (11/1)Tune in for Love (11/5)Undercover Brother 2(11/5)Up North (11/1)Wild Child (11/1)Zombieland (11/1)TVAmerican Son (11/1)Atypical: Season 3 (11/1)Avlu: Part 2 (11/15)Barbie Dreamhouse Adventures: Go Team(11/1)Billy on the Street(11/1)Busted!: Season 2 (11/8)Chief of Staff: Season 2 (11/11)Chip and Potato: Season 2 (11/29)Dirty John: Season 1 (11/25)Dolly Parton’s Heartstrings (11/22)GO!: The Unforgettable Party(11/15)Greatest Events of WWII in HD Colour (11/8)Green Eggs and Ham (11/8)Hache(11/1)Harvey Girls Forever!: Season 3 (11/12)Hello Ninja(11/1)High Seas: Season 2 (11/22)I’m with the Band: Nasty Cherry (11/15)Iliza: Unveiled(11/19)Jeff Garlin: Our Man In Chicago (11/12)John Crist: I Ain’t Prayin For That (11/28)La Reina del Sur: Season 2 (11/29)Levius (TBD)Little Things: Season 3 (11/9)Llama Llama: Season 2 (11/15)Mars: Season 2Meet the Adebanjos: Seasons 1-3 (11/22)Merry Happy Whatever (11/28)Mike Birbiglia: The New One (11/26)Mobile Suit Gundam: Iron-Blooded Orphans: Seasons 1-2Mortel (11/21)Mytho (11/28)Nailed It! Holiday!: Season 2 (11/22)Narcoworld: Dope Stories (11/22)Nobody’s Looking (11/22)Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj: Volume 5 (11/10)Queer Eye: We’re in Japan!(11/1)Roberts: Season 1SCAMS (11/6)Seth Meyers: Lobby Baby (11/5)She-Ra and the Princesses of Power: Season 4 (11/5)Singapore Social(11/22)Sugar Rush Christmas(11/29)Super Monsters Save Christmas (11/26)The Club(11/15)The Crown: Season 3 (11/17)The Deep: Season 3The Dragon Prince: Season 3 (11/22)The End of the F***ing World: Season 2 (11/5)The Great British Baking Show: Holidays: Season 2 (11/8)The Movies That Made Us (11/29)The Stranded (11/14)The Toys That Made Us: Season 3 (11/15)Trolls: The Beat Goes On!: Season 8 (11/22)True: Grabbleapple Harvest(11/1)True: Winter Wishes (11/26)We Are the Wave(11/1)Wild District: Season 2 (11/8)Expiring300 (11/1)42 (11/1)A Dog’s Life (11/1)Amazing Hotels: Life Beyond the Lobby: Season 1 (11/3)As Good as It Gets (11/1)Blue Bloods: Season 1-8 (11/5)Boyhood (11/25)Caddyshack (11/1)Caddyshack 2 (11/1)Chasing Liberty (11/1)Coco (11/29)Continuum: Season 1-4 (11/15)Gran Torino (11/1)Groundhog Day (11/1)Last Tango in Halifax: Season 1-3 (11/2)Life Unexpected: Season 1-2 (11/30)Little Women (11/1)Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (11/1)Mamma Mia! (11/16)Nikita: Season 1-4 (11/22)Recess: Taking the Fifth Grade (11/1)Road House (11/1)Romeo Is Bleeding (11/1)Scary Movie 2 (11/1)Scream (11/1)Seal Team Six: The Raid on Osama Bin Laden (11/1)Sex and the City: The Movie (11/1)Stardust (11/1)Stitches (11/1)Taking Lives (11/1)The American (11/1)The Bank Job (11/1)The Bishop’s Wife (11/1)The House Bunny (11/1)The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (11/1)The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (11/1)The Red Road: Season 1-2 (11/23)The Sixth Sense (11/1) Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate The Anatomy of Fear TAGSnetflixNovemnber Previous articleWhen Halloween became America’s most dangerous holidayNext articleDemings opposes new HUD rule that burdens homeowners and renters Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here November marks a lot of movement for Netflix.We’re losing favorites like The Lord of the Rings, Blue Bloods, Mamma Mia!, Coco, Scream, and The Sixth Sense — but gaining a whole lot more. Here’s what’s coming.On the TV side, Netflix is bringing back new seasons of The Crown, The End of the F***ing World, The Great British Baking Show: Holidays, Atypical, and The Deep. We’re also getting a handful of new comedy specials, including work from Mike Birbiglia, Iliza Shlesinger, and Seth Meyers.As for movies, Earthquake Bird, The King, Klaus, The Irishman, I Lost My Body, and Atlantics— all among the most anticipated projects coming to Netflix this fall — will make their streaming debuts after limited theatrical releases.Check out everything coming to (and going from) Netflix in November 2019 below.Top Pick: The Crown Season 3After what felt like the longest two years of our lives, The Crown is finally back for Season 3. Claire Foy has passed the torch to Olivia Colman, who will assume the role of Queen Elizabeth II for the series’ next two installments — taking place during the ’60s and ’70s.Alongside Colman, Helena Bonham Carter will play Princess Margaret, Tobias Menzies will play The Duke of Edinburgh, Josh O’Connor will play Prince Charles, Erin Doherty will play Princess Anne, Ben Daniels will play Lord Snowdon, Jason Watkins will play Prime Minister Harold Wilson, and Charles Dance will play Lord Mountbatten. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Bankson and Becker: Always a coin flip apart

first_img TAGSApopka City CommissionApopka Elections 2020ResultsVoting Previous articleCoronavirus quarantines and your legal rights: 4 questions answeredNext articleHope CommUnity Center shares resources for residents who need assistance getting through COVID-19 Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Opinion/AnalysisBy Reggie Connell/Managing Editor of The Apopka VoiceDoug Bankson and Kyle Becker have a lot in common.Apopka City Commissioner Doug BanksonBoth began their political careers in 2016. Both survived a general election that year against incumbent opponents, and both won their runoffs to become first-time commissioners.Then on Tuesday, Bankson and Becker became the first incumbent commissioners in 10 years to defend their seats against challengers.Bankson claimed 4,393 votes (60%), outdistancing challenger Leroy Bell, who received 2,917 votes (40%). It was a larger margin than Bankson’s runoff victory over then-incumbent Sam Ruth in 2016, when he received 2,707 votes (55.5%).Commissioners Kyle Becker (left) and Doug Bankson (right) will be returning to the Apopka City Commission after decisive victories on Tuesday night.“With all that is going on in the nation right now I am truly grateful for those who came out in support and cast  your vote, and I will do my best to serve the citizens of Apopka,” Bankson said. “I am so thankful to our entire team of faithful volunteers who did such an amazing job, and all those who gave so generously to help us across the finish line. I am extremely grateful for my family, our congregation, and for all those who have prayed for us. Special thanks to my campaign manager and son for coordinating everything so well. I want to thank my wonderful wife who is simply amazing and the real wind beneath my wings, and of course I want to thank the Lord who is my strength and put it in my heart to serve. I ask for His wisdom most of all. Now it’s time that we all come together and support each other through the challenges ahead, and I know we will show everyone how amazing the people of Apopka really are. Let us have faith and not fear, unity and not division, and may we protect and value every life. I thank God that I live in Apopka, and I am truly optimistic that we will pull together and pull through whatever is ahead. The election is over and it’s time to become one voice of freedom and brotherly love. Apopka, let’s keep moving forward together!”Apopka City Commissioner Kyle BeckerBecker experienced a slightly better outcome than Bankson, 4,472 votes (62%), to challenger Lorena Potter’s 2,772 votes (38%). He also outperformed his 2016 showing, when he defeated 40-year incumbent Bill Arrowsmith with 2,689 votes (55%).“First, I would like to thank Lorena Potter and her supporters for a competitive and civil campaign,” said Becker. “I know how much hard work and long hours go into running a campaign like this, and she should be commended for it. I am so grateful to my fellow Apopka voters, and the confidence they have in me to be their representative voice on our city’s Council.  I have taken great pride in being a prepared and practical leader and feel so privileged to serve a second term as Commissioner of Seat 4.  There are many family, friends, and campaign supporters to thank for helping me on this path, but the most important are those that cast a vote, and use that vote as their voice for what they want Apopka to be.  I will continue to fight for their best interests, and all of Apopka.”Potter posted on her Facebook page, “Congratulations to Kyle Becker on his retention of Apopka City Council Seat 4. Many thanks to all of the friends, family and volunteers who supported me throughout my campaign. It was a great experience and I really enjoyed getting out in the community and meeting so many people. Although I will not be a Commissioner, I still plan to stay actively engaged in community affairs.” Potter reached out to Becker and congratulated him on the phone, offering her support and sharing that she would be happy to be a resource to him and help anyway she can. She said there has never been any animosity between them, and they are “all good”.So what’s my point, you may ask. Two candidates start their careers the same year, and then win two straight elections. How is that so unusual?Well, here’s two more logs to throw onto the Bankson-Becker fire…In 2018, the city council needed a vice mayor to succeed Billie Dean, who retired after 24 years in office. According to the Apopka Charter, the commissioner with the most seniority becomes the vice mayor.But in this case, Bankson and Becker were tied with two years apiece, so it was decided by a coin flip by newly-minted Apopka Mayor Bryan Nelson. Becker called “tails”, it was heads.Bankson wins by a coin toss.The flip of a coin is one thing, but what about comparing their track records in their last three elections?I’m glad you asked…Bankson received 2,707 votes in the 2016 general election, 3,900 votes in the 2016 runoff, and 4,393 in the 2020 general election for a total of 11,000 votes.Becker received 2,689 votes in the 2016 general election, 3,639 votes in the 2016 runoff, and 4,472 votes in the 2020 general election for a total of 10,800 votes.A razor-thin margin of 200 votes from 21,800 votes cast!The next municipal elections in Apopka are in 2022 when Seats #1 and #2 on the city commission will be up for grabs. Commissioners Alexander H. Smith (Seat #1), and Alice Nolan (Seat #2) are the incumbents. Mayor Bryan Nelson will also be up for re-election in 2022.Bankson and Becker will be off the ballot in the next election cycle… or at least they will not be defending Seats #3 and #4. But do not be shocked to see these two commissioners square off one day with more than a coin toss at stake. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more