552 Schools Inspected and Fogged

Story Highlights Five hundred and fifty-two schools have been inspected and fogged ahead of the start of the new academic year in September by the Ministry of Health and Wellness. This announcement was made by the Minister of Health and Wellness, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, at the Ministry’s Quarterly Press Briefing, on Tuesday (August 27), at the head office in New Kingston. Five hundred and fifty-two schools have been inspected and fogged ahead of the start of the new academic year in September by the Ministry of Health and Wellness.This announcement was made by the Minister of Health and Wellness, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton, at the Ministry’s Quarterly Press Briefing, on Tuesday (August 27), at the head office in New Kingston.“That process is ongoing and will continue through the first few weeks of school to ensure that our children are protected in that environment,” Dr. Tufton said.One major goal from conducting these inspections and fogging is to ensure schools are prepared to accommodate students and not let them become infected by the dengue virus through the breeding of the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes on school compounds across the island.He said representatives from the Ministry have also examined water catchment facilities at the schools, observed their solid waste facilities, made recommendations where necessary and cited if schools are in breach of any rules.Additionally, in an effort to eliminate the spread of the dengue virus across the island, the Ministry of Health, through the National Health Fund (NHF), will be spending $130 million on activities geared towards clearing breeding sites of the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.For this initiative, the Ministry will be collaborating with the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) and the Parish Councils, through the Local Government Ministry. “That process is ongoing and will continue through the first few weeks of school to ensure that our children are protected in that environment,” Dr. Tufton said. read more

Grange Commends Sprint Golden Girls Satisfied with Great Progress in Field Events

The Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange, has hailed the Jamaican women’s team which won the 4×100 metres relay at World Championships in Doha on Saturday.Minister Grange said “the victory showed the depth and determination of the Jamaican team” which was hit by the withdrawal of the double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson.In Thompson’s absence, Jamaica had to call on the 400 metres bronze medalist  Shericka Jackson.Minister Grange said:“It’s a great statement that even without Elaine, we were able to win in such a fine style with the world leading time (41.44).  I send heartiest congratulations to Natalliah Whyte, Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce, Jonielle Smith and Shericka Jackson on this tremendous achievement.  Well done, ladies!”The Jamaicans won the sprint relay ahead of Great Britain and the United States.Minister Grange also commended Shanieka Ricketts who took the silver medal in the Triple Jump with a best mark of 14.92 metres.  Kimberly Williams was fourth with a personal best of 14.64 metres.Minister Grange said she was “pleased with the performance of the team” and was “excited by the great progress that Jamaica’s athletes are making in the jumps and throws.”At the close of Saturday’s penultimate day of the Doha 2019, Jamaica were third on the medal table with nine medals: three gold, four silver and two bronze.  Four of those came in field events. Minister Grange said “the victory showed the depth and determination of the Jamaican team” which was hit by the withdrawal of the double Olympic champion Elaine Thompson. The Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange, has hailed the Jamaican women’s team which won the 4×100 metres relay at World Championships in Doha on Saturday. Story Highlights In Thompson’s absence, Jamaica had to call on the 400 metres bronze medalist  Shericka Jackson. read more

Attractions Pivotal To Jamaicas Tourism Product

Dr. Chang said attractions such as Dunn’s River Falls, continue to be among the biggest pulls for cruise and stopover visitors, noting that it has emerged as one of, if not the biggest of its kind in the region. He was speaking at Chukka Caribbean Adventures’ ‘Zip Line over Dunn’s River’ attraction launch in Ocho Rios, St. Ann, on October 4. Story Highlights National Security Minister, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang, says Jamaica’s world-class attractions have been pivotal in positioning the island as a prominent global tourism destination. National Security Minister, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang, says Jamaica’s world-class attractions have been pivotal in positioning the island as a prominent global tourism destination.Dr. Chang said attractions such as Dunn’s River Falls, continue to be among the biggest pulls for cruise and stopover visitors, noting that it has emerged as one of, if not the biggest of its kind in the region.He was speaking at Chukka Caribbean Adventures’ ‘Zip Line over Dunn’s River’ attraction launch in Ocho Rios, St. Ann, on October 4.Dr, Chang noted that despite the growth in hotel development in Jamaica over the years, “it became clear that we needed to do more in order to get the volume of visitors we would want to bring to our shores”.“As time went on, the need to ensure that Jamaica could offer world-competitive attractions became a key part of the industry,” he argued.While acknowledging that Jamaica is blessed with a number of natural attractions… the Minister contended that “[there is] nothing that could compare to the size and appeal of Dunn’s River Falls”.The Minister said Dunn’s River’s mystique defies the imagination, noting that there are few places globally boasting a river with waterfalls flowing to a beach.“It is just one of those peculiarities that we are lucky to have and which reinforces the point that Jamaica is, indeed, a blessed country,” he added.Dr. Chang noted, however, that although the attraction can stand on its own merit, it requires input to broaden its appeal.Against this background, he welcomed the collaboration forged between Chukka Caribbean Adventures and the Urban Development Corporation (UDC), which owns and operates Dunn’s River, as a “step in the right direction” that is consistent with the Government’s focus on bolstering public and private-sector partnerships.The UDC and Chukka Caribbean Adventures have entered into an arrangement where for the very first time, the popular zip line has been introduced as a part of the offerings at Dunn’s River Falls.“Chukka is undoubtedly the Caribbean’s number-one attraction company. It has so many assets… it brings so many benefits. As a Jamaican company, it means that there is and will be greater spend by the tourist in Jamaica.They have really chartered the course in many ways and have showed us how we can make an attraction a business.” the Minister said.Dr. Chang said the Government has taken steps to remove a number of taxes that were impediments to business and business expansion, so as to encourage investment and to give companies like Chukka the incentive to do even bigger and greater things.“This partnership will add to the quality of the attraction. It is a welcome addition and we are encouraging other partners to step up with their ideas, where the Government can lend its support,” he added. read more

Column 11 ways to handle your childs first teen disco

first_imgI REMEMBER THE excitement of going to my first few discos with friends, the endless conversations with the girls – looking forward to the nightand planning what to wear was a big part of it. As teens we made mistakes, as our teens will too. Yet, now we are parents, we can be unsure of the best way to keep our young person safe. The key is a strong relationship and strong boundaries for the teen years. Strong rules without a strong relationship with your teen may mean much conflict.Gardaí say drink is the biggest problem and that teens arrive at discos either with drink taken or with drink on them. Where are they getting this alcohol? Be sure you do not provide the first drink.Remember that newspapers sell on the basis of scary headlines; there may be a minority doing what papers say. Instead, use it as an opportunity to talk with your teen about your values and the behaviour you expect from them.Finally, peer pressure is often blamed for how a teen behaves; studies show the more disconnected the teen, the stronger the influence the peer group is. The stronger the parent/teen relationship, it less of a problem the peer group is.1. A strong relationshipThe strength of the relationship is ultimately the only real control you have over your child. A strong bond between parent and young person where the communication is open (easier said than done!) as this humorous example shows:‘Where are you going?’ – ‘Nowhere’‘Who are you going with?’ – ‘No one’‘What are you doing?’ –’Nothing’Spending time with them and telling them what they are doing right is very important during the teen years, as it is not an easy time for them. Being conscious of talking ‘with’ and not ‘at’ them is crucial, as you want them to feel they can open up to you. This is achieved by listening and acknowledging how they feel and giving them a sense of feeling understood.2. Keep them busy‘Delay and distract’ is great advice if you want your teenager to not have to deal with discos, alcohol and the opposite sex too early. Involvement in a sport or hobby is one of the best protectors for this. It may involve a commitment from you, but it is worth it in the long run. So often I am told of teenage boys/girls who ‘fall through the cracks’ when faced with things they simply are not ready to deal with, where a sport would have provided a healthier alternative in meeting the opposite sex.3. Don’t give them an immediate answer to ‘everybody’s going’It is always good to check with other parents and chat through arrangements. These parents may be dropping or collecting your teenager so important that you are both ‘singing off the same hymn sheet’.4. Know the parents and validate the arrangementHelpful, but not always easy if your teenager has changed friends from primary school, but worth the effort. Knowing the parents means you can make a quick call to confirm that arrangements are as you think they are. An example I heard recently involved a mum who thought her daughter was on a sleepover, but everyone at the sleepover (including her daughter) went to a disco. The mum of the house assumed she had permission. Many parents say how few parents call them when parties/sleepovers are at their house.5. ClothesThe clothes that your teen chooses for going to the disco is a topic that really gets parents heated. Role model dressing appropriately and advise them that their outfit is sending a message, what message does it send? Do you want unwelcome attention? Talk about your preferences, ‘I’d prefer you to tone it down’. Over-controlling does not work – they simply change clothes.Teens want to experiment with their identity and they make mistakes in their choice of clothes, but they learn from it too. The heels that leave them in agony for the evening are discarded for something more wearable the next time. So parents, take a deep breath and remember the vast majority come through these rites of passage unscathed.6. Talk with themBefore giving them permission, it is important to use the opportunity to see how they would deal with situations that may arise, whether it’s unwelcome attention, pressure to drink, or a situation developing that they are not happy about.7. Give them an ‘out’They need to know that they can text you and you will call and tell them they are needed at home if they feel it is necessary. As Oprah says: ‘Doubt means don’t. Don’t move. Don’t rush forward’. Gardaí have told me that many teens who end up in trouble at a disco never intended to, they just feel they have no other option in the crowd. Telling them to say they feel unwell can be a way of leaving a situation they are unsure about. This may mean that you are on call for the evening, however.8. Strong boundariesAfter a strong relationship, we need to have strong boundaries for our young teenager, which makes them feel secure. They need boundaries around reasonable dress, no photos on Facebook that may cause them problems later, no alcohol, and appropriate behaviour. Talk with them about alcohol and give them good reasons not to drink. If you are not collecting them from the disco, you should think about staying up (or getting up) and being downstairs to let them in and have a quick chat – teens say knowing this means they don’t drink.9. NegotiateA key word for the teenage years is to negotiate differences. Our teens need to be listened to and treated with respect. An over-controlling parent may experience a teen who becomes out of control or who simply conforms through fear. A warm relationship where the teen has a sense of their feelings being understood and listened to, means differences can be negotiated.10. Money – keep them a bit shortToo much money causes problems. Remember: they cannot drink without money.11. TrustOnce you have communicated clearly-defined expectations with your teenager and the relationship is good, you need to trust them. Every teenager makes a mistake but with a strong relationship and when you keep communicating and negotiate difference you will find this transition easier. Don’t focus so much on having a ‘good teenager’ that you forget you already have one.Sheila O Malley is one of Ireland’s leading parenting experts who set up Practical Parenting to offer support and training for parents. Sheila is a fully qualified Parent and Relationships Mentor who offers her services to companies and schools; is a regular contributor to TV and radio and is a former parenting correspondent with Independent Newspapers. Book Sheila for parenting/relationship and well-being talks or a course for your company or school, or try her one-on-one parent support service. Sheila runs workshops and courses year round – see www.practicalparenting.ie for further details. To read more articles by Sheila for TheJournal.ie click here.Column: Discussing teen drinking… over a bottle of vino>Revealed: the life of a 13-year-old growing up in Ireland>last_img read more