KSAMC Warns Against Mounting Party Posters on Corporate Area Heritage Sites

Story Highlights Kingston’s Mayor, Senator Councillor Delroy Williams, warned that the KSAMC will be taking strong action if the practice continues. Promoters mounting party posters on heritage sites across the Corporate Area will soon find themselves in trouble with the Kingston and St Andrew Municipal Corporation (KSAMC). “I want to say to promoters who are guilty of posting on our heritage sites to desist from doing so,” he urged, during the KSAMC’s monthly meeting on Tuesday (September 10), at the Corporation’s office in downtown Kingston. Promoters mounting party posters on heritage sites across the Corporate Area will soon find themselves in trouble with the Kingston and St Andrew Municipal Corporation (KSAMC).Kingston’s Mayor, Senator Councillor Delroy Williams, warned that the KSAMC will be taking strong action if the practice continues.“I want to say to promoters who are guilty of posting on our heritage sites to desist from doing so,” he urged, during the KSAMC’s monthly meeting on Tuesday (September 10), at the Corporation’s office in downtown Kingston.“Our heritage sites are of cultural and historic value to us and it cannot be that we see it fit to put up party posters and deface our heritage sites,” he added.Mayor Williams also warned promoters to ensure that persons putting up posters on their behalf, refrain from mounting them on heritage sites.“So those promoters who are guilty of that and those who are not aware of it, because they claim that they are not the ones putting up the posters, they must ensure that the persons who are putting up the posters have clear instructions not to put those on our heritage sites.“If they continue to do so, the Municipality will have no option but to take appropriate actions to protect our heritage sites,” Senator Williams warned.According to the Mayor, party posters have been seen on the several historic landmarks across the Corporate Area. These include the clock in Cross Roads and the Ward Theatre in downtown Kingston.“It does not look good, it is not appropriate and it is not in keeping with the industry. The creative industry ought to protect the culture and history of the City of Kingston,” he said, while indicating that he will be raising this issue with the promoters when they meet.“This practice of just putting up posters all over, anywhere, has to be discontinued,” Senator Williams emphasised. read more

Govt Looking To Train More Dispute Resolution Mediators

Story Highlights This, according to Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, forms part of plans to significantly reduce the backlog of court cases. “The way in which fewer cases can go to the courts is for us to use alternative dispute resolution. Therefore, the Ministry will be pushing [for] the training of trainers in mediation because we need more mediators across the island. I will continue to go across the different parishes to ensure that, in every community, we can resolve disputes in a timely manner… using alternative dispute resolution,” he said, while noting that key stakeholders, such as lay magistrates, have pivotal roles to play. The Government is looking to train more alternative dispute resolution mediators.This, according to Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, forms part of plans to significantly reduce the backlog of court cases.“The way in which fewer cases can go to the courts is for us to use alternative dispute resolution. Therefore, the Ministry will be pushing [for] the training of trainers in mediation because we need more mediators across the island. I will continue to go across the different parishes to ensure that, in every community, we can resolve disputes in a timely manner… using alternative dispute resolution,” he said, while noting that key stakeholders, such as lay magistrates, have pivotal roles to play.“We must [be able to] show results… and for our local and international partners and all of Jamaica to see results, it means that justice must be delivered in a timely way,” he emphasised.The Minister was speaking at a training seminar for judges and lay magistrates, dubbed ‘Train the Trainer Session: Lay Magistrates’ Court’, at Hilton Rose Hall Resort and Spa in Montego Bay, St. James, on Saturday (September 28).Meanwhile, Mr. Chuck reiterated the Government’s commitment to expanding and promoting restorative justice as an alternative for curbing crime. This, he said, will aid in improving the justice system’s efficiency.“Restorative justice must play its part, not only in the schools and the churches, but also the communities. We believe mediation can help Jamaicans solve the conflicts in the communities in Jamaica. We solve far too many problems with violence. This cannot be the way,” he argued.The three-day training session, which ran from September 27 to 29, was organised by the Justice Training Institute (JTI) in tandem with the Justice Undertakings for Social Transformation (JUST) Project, and National Integrity Action (NIA), under the theme ‘Learning through Shared Experience: A Model Approach to Empowering Lay Magistrates as Adjudicators’.It formed part of a strategic partnership between the Governments of Jamaica and Canada to further develop and bolster the nation’s justice sector. The Government is looking to train more alternative dispute resolution mediators. read more

Vancouver buys CP Rail land for urban greenway ending longrunning dispute

Vancouver buys CP Rail land for urban greenway, ending long-running dispute VANCOUVER – A long-running dispute between Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway (TSX:CP) over an old rail corridor through the centre of the city has been settled.The city has agreed to pay $55 million for the railway route, which stretches nine kilometres and consists of almost 17 hectares of open space.Mayor Gregor Robertson said Monday the agreement means the city will be able to transform the area into a greenway that connects neighbourhoods from False Creek near downtown to Marpole on the Fraser River on the south side.Part of the corridor is also slated for use as a light-rail, rapid transit system, which Robertson said would operate alongside the public greenway that will be available for walking and cycling.Residents have been growing gardens and planting trees on the land for over a decade.Talks on the sale had broken off. Then in 2014, the city said CP planned to start clearing the Arbutus corridor for railway use again.Robertson said there was a change in heart by both parties late last fall that led to the deal.Keith Creel, CP’s president and chief operating officer, said the agreement is positive for the city and the railway.“This has been a very contentious issue for Canadian Pacific and the City of Vancouver, probably for the last decade,” Creel said. “With that said, the history of CP in Vancouver dates back to its origins, over 130 years. It’s a been a positive relationship. It’s one that we valued.”CP stopped running trains on the line about 14 years ago.Robertson compared the development to a revitalized part of New York City that has seen an old rail line turned into a park.“This is a historic agreement and a one-in-a-generation opportunity for our city,” he said. “This is really Vancouver’s chance to have a New York-style High Line, repurposing of what was freight railroad.”He said the city will establish an office to oversee the design of the greenway and it will make improvements to the railway corridor before the long-term plan is finalized.Under the agreement, CP will remove existing rails and ties within two years. by The Canadian Press Posted Mar 7, 2016 11:41 am MDT Last Updated Mar 7, 2016 at 3:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

Project hopes to brand provinces states as protein highway

PIERRE, S.D. – Officials in three Canadian provinces and six northern U.S. states are launching an effort to brand the region as the potential provider of protein to the world.The “Protein Highway” project aims to encourage scientists to work together and share information on protein-rich crops, said Kevin Kephart, South Dakota State University’s vice-president for research and economic development.That could lead to research that would aid farmers and also help entrepreneurs take new food products to market, he said.“There’s no place on the globe that can produce as much protein as we can,” Kephart said.Canadian researchers David Gauthier and Larry Sernyk estimate the demand for animal protein will double by 2040 as the world’s population increases.That should result in more demand for high-protein plant products to feed the animals being raised for meat. More people also likely will need to get their protein from plants and fish.“There’s a lot of opportunity,” said Jamshed Merchant, the Canadian consul general based in Minneapolis.High-protein crops such as lentils, dry beans and dry peas have great potential throughout the “Protein Highway” region, which encompasses Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta north of the border and the Dakotas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Montana and Iowa south of the border, the Canadian researchers said.Another project that could benefit is Prairie Aquatech, a company headed by a pair of SDSU scientists that’s looking for ways to use plant-based food to raise fish.The Protein Highway concept could also increase demand for farm products in the region and lead to a more diverse array of crops to choose from during planting season, according to Merchant.“Your choices become quite large,” he said. “It’s just like diversifying your portfolio.”Obstacles include a lack of processing facilities and the need to convince the government to offer insurance for new crops.“This is why we need to get to work,” Kephart said.___Information from: Pierre Capital Journal, http://www.capjournal.com Project hopes to brand provinces, states as ‘protein highway’ by The Associated Press Posted Mar 14, 2016 6:55 am MDT Last Updated Mar 14, 2016 at 7:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more