ANICET, MARC ANDRE

first_img55, of Pleasantville, NJ, died suddenly on June 2, 2017. Born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Marc immigrated to the United States in 1980 where he resided in Miami Florida and Bayonne before settling in Pleasantville for the past 7 years. He was employed as a bus driver for the Yorkie Bus Company in Egg Harbor Township. Marc was predeceased by his parents Lhrreson and Simone (Bernedette) Anicet and his sister Vivian Samidy. Left to cherish his memory are his 2 daughters, Stephanie and Elizabeth Anicet; 3 sons, Marc Steven, Marc Billy and Marc Anicet; 3 sisters, Monique Anicet, Barcelone Beirette, and Laura Joseph; 3 brothers, Dwight Vivien, Louis Thierie Anicet and Jackson Samidy; Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Funeral arrangements by DWORZANSKI & SON Funeral Home, 20 E 22nd St.last_img read more

David Opdyke’s “This Land” now on view at Mana Contemporary The…

first_img“This Land’ by David Opdyke Across more than five hundred postcards, each one portraying a distinct slice of idealized Americana (town squares, mountain highways, main streets and county seats), Opdykeʼs acerbic, emotionally jarring alterations gradually become evident. In this prophetic refashioning, forests are aflame, tornadoes torque from one card into the next, a steamboat gets swallowed up whole by some sort of new megafauna, frogs fall like Biblical hail from the sky. The human responses form a cacophony of desires and demands, panic and denial. Biplanes trail banners urging Repent Now!, others insist Legislative Action Would Be Premature, while still others advertise seats on an actual Ark.This exhibition coincides with the release of This Land: An Epic Postcard Mural on the Future of a Country in Ecological Peril, a book on Opdyke’s wall piece, with commentary by Lawrence Weschler and an afterword by Maya Wiley, published by the Monacelli Press.Since David Opdyke, This Land opened at Mana Contemporary, the work has been featured in the Nation and the Atlantic.ABOUT DAVID OPDYKEDavid Opdyke is an artist known for his trenchant political send-ups of American culture. Opdyke’s political awakening in the early 2000s led to a body of work that confronts the horrors of contemporary America. His hyperreal topographical models of suburbs comment on mall culture and suburban sprawl, while his sculptures of ruined monuments mock imperialistic hubris. His work is held in the collections of the Brooklyn Museum, MoMA, and the Washington Convention Center.ABOUT THE MONACELLI PRESSAs a leading publisher of illustrated books for twenty-five years, the Monacelli Press has challenged the conventions of publishing to produce provocative, inspiring, and essential titles on architecture, visual art, interior design, landscape architecture, photography, and applied arts. In 2020 the Monacelli Press became an imprint of Phaidon Press, the world’s premier publisher of the creative arts. The Monacelli Press was founded in 1994 by Gianfranco Monacelli and launched with the seminal title, S,M,L,XL, by Rem Koolhaas and Bruce Mau.ABOUT MANA CONTEMPORARYMana Contemporary fosters an ecosystem of communities dedicated to reshaping the art world, through shared resources and equity of opportunity. Its physical campuses in Jersey City, Chicago, and Miami, as well as a robust digital platform, provide a nexus of community and support through programming, exhibitions, activations, and conversations dedicated to celebrating the creative process.For more information, visit manacontemporary.com. [email protected]#manacontemporaryMana Contemporary 888 Newark Avenue Jersey City, NJ 07306 Mana Contemporary invites the public to a new exhibit, now open, of David Opdyke, This Land, an epic vintage postcard mural on the future of a country in ecological peril. Please email [email protected] to schedule your visit. Before traveling to Mana Contemporary, please review our COVID Safety Guidelines.This Land is an epic mural (16 feet long by 8 feet high) fashioned by New York artist David Opdyke out of vintage American postcards which he then treated with disconcerting painterly interventions. What at first reads as a panoramic birdʼs-eye view of an idyllic alpine valley reveals itself, upon closer examination, to be an array of connected scenes and vignettes. center_img ×”This Land’ by David Opdykelast_img read more

WDFW Tentatively Plans 24 Days of Razor Clam Digging in April…

first_imgFacebook11Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Washington Department of Fish and WildlifeThe Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has proposed a series of razor clam digs in April and May to cap a season packed with more “beach days” than any time in the past 25 years.After a nine-day opening that runs through March 24, state shellfish managers plan to end the season with another 24 days of digging on morning low tides at various beaches from April 4 through May 17.Final approval of those digs depends on the results of marine toxin tests, which have consistently shown this season that the clams are safe to eat.“We’ve had a great season so far and we expect it to continue that way in the months ahead,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager. “We have an abundance of clams on most beaches, which makes for some terrific digging opportunities.”Proposed digging days in April and May, along with the remaining digs in March, are posted on WDFW’s website.Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. No digging is allowed on any beach after noon.Counting the new dates in April and May, Ayres said WDFW plans to provide a total of 286 “beach days” of digging on Washington beaches this season – the highest number since 1989. He defined a “beach day” as one beach open for a single day, so four beaches open for one day counts as four beach days.Annual razor clam seasons typically end in mid-to-late May, when the clams begin to spawn and are less desirable for eating, Ayres said.He reminds diggers they will need a valid 2015-16 fishing license to participate in razor clam digs effective April 1, the beginning of the new license year. Various types of fishing licenses are available online, by phone (866-246-9453), and from authorized license dealers throughout the state.Meanwhile, state wildlife managers are urging clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula and on a section of Twin Harbors beach.The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.” Both species are listed as “threatened” under the federal Endangered Species Act.“Nesting season for snowy plovers and streaked horned larks begins in early April, coinciding with the scheduled clam digs,” said Anthony Novack, district biologist for WDFW. “Snowy plover nests are difficult to see, so it’s easy to disturb or destroy them without even being aware of it. If an adult is scared off its nest, it leaves the eggs exposed to predators like crows and ravens.”To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line, Novack said.Dig dates in May for Copalis and Mocrocks will be announced after harvest from the April digs has been analyzed. Upcoming digs in April and May are scheduled on the following dates, pending favorable marine toxin results:· April 4, Saturday, 7:23 a.m.; 0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis· April 5, Sunday, 7:57 a.m.; 0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis· April 6, Monday, 8:32 a.m.; 0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 7, Tuesday, 9:09 a.m.; 0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 8, Wednesday, 9:48 a.m.; 0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 9, Thursday, 10:32 a.m.; 0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 10, Friday, 11:23 a.m.; 0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 17, Friday, 6:03 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks· April 18, Saturday, 6:52 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis· April 19, Sunday, 7:39 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Copalis· April 20, Monday, 8:25 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 21, Tuesday, 9:11 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 22, Wednesday, 9:57 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 23, Thursday, 10:46 a.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· April 24, Friday, 11:38 a.m.; 0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 2, Saturday, 6:23 a.m., 0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 3, Sunday, 6:59 a.m., -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 7, Thursday, 9:30 a.m., -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 8, Friday, 10:14 a.m., -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 9, Saturday, 11:03 a.m., -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 10, Sunday, 11:58 a.m., -0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 15, Friday, 4:58 a.m., -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 16, Saturday, 5:50 a.m., -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors· May 17, Sunday, 6:38 a.m., -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harborslast_img read more