Government to Partner in Support of Local Acadian Community

first_imgThe province is investing $250,000 in a trust fund that will support activities and new projects for La Picasse Community Cultural Centre in Richmond County. Michel Samson, Minister of Acadian Affairs and Francophonie, announced the funding today, March 27, at La Picasse Community Cultural Centre in Petit-de-Grat, on Isle Madame. “La Picasse Community Cultural Centre plays a pivotal role in the preservation and development of the Acadian and francophone community in Nova Scotia,” said Mr. Samson. “By supporting the centre, we are making it easier for Acadians to enjoy what their community has to offer for years to come.” The province is matching an investment by the Mouse Island Marine Centre Association, bringing the total to $500,000. The interest from the trust fund will be allocated annually to support La Picasse Community Cultural Centre. La Picasse promotes Acadian culture and the French language through artistic, cultural and educational programming. Its facilities are available for use by the Acadian and Francophone communities. “This investment in the trust fund is a first step toward ensuring that our community can further finance the activities and programs of the community cultural centre,” said Yvon Samson, president of La Picasse. “We will now be able to better operate and support new projects for the Acadian community.” Investment in community and cultural organizations and advancing cultural diversity are vital parts of the province’s recently unveiled culture strategy, Nova Scotia’s Culture Action Plan. The full plan is online at novascotia.ca/culture/. To learn more about La Picasse Community Cultural Centre, visit www.lapicasse.ca.last_img read more

Persons Warned Not to Purchase Pesticides with Repackaged Labels

“We have inspectors that visit these stores and they see these repackaged containers that can be confiscated, because the farmers that are using it, or general persons who are buying the repackaged pesticides, need to have all the information,” she said. According to the PCA Registrar, Tamara Morrison, it is illegal to repackage labels, as the Authority is the only body mandated to regulate the manufacture, use and distribution of pesticides. The Pesticides Control Authority (PCA) is warning citizens against purchasing pesticides with repackaged labels. Story Highlights The Pesticides Control Authority (PCA) is warning citizens against purchasing pesticides with repackaged labels.According to the PCA Registrar, Tamara Morrison, it is illegal to repackage labels, as the Authority is the only body mandated to regulate the manufacture, use and distribution of pesticides.“We have inspectors that visit these stores and they see these repackaged containers that can be confiscated, because the farmers that are using it, or general persons who are buying the repackaged pesticides, need to have all the information,” she said.Speaking with JIS News, Ms. Morrison noted that critical information such as withdrawal periods and preharvest periods that are listed on labels can be compromised if they are repackaged, and can lead to misinformation affecting farmers negatively.“The general information that is found on the label is very important and the label is a major part of our registration process to ensure that all the information needed by the public is available – protective wear, user information, how it is diluted, crops it is intended for and pests it is intended for,” she explained.According to Ms. Morrison, a common misconception is that pesticides can be used on several pests if they are in the same classification.“For example, a tick wash cannot be used on a mite problem, because this is not something that can be used on food, so it is very important that when farmers get the label, they know that they are using it for the intended crop and the intended pest and that they are using it in proper concentration,” she said.The PCA is the regulatory agency for the pesticide industry and pest control operators. read more