PHOTOS March Against Child Labour

Minister of State in the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Zavia Mayne, interacts with young Catherine Marsh during the road march observing World Day Against Child Labour. The march, which started at the Ministry’s 1F North Street location, culminated at the St. William Grant Park in downtown Kingston. World Day Against Child Labour is observed annually on June 12 and focuses attention on the global extent of child labour and the action and efforts needed to eliminate it. The day is celebrated under the theme ‘Children shouldn’t work in fields, but on dreams’. Minister of State in the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Zavia Mayne (third right), along with volunteers, participates in the road march observing World Day Against Child Labour. The march, which began at the Ministry’s 1F North Street location culminated at the St. William Grant Park in downtown Kingston. World Day Against Child Labour is observed annually on June 12 and focuses attention on the global extent of child labour and the action and efforts needed to eliminate it. The day is celebrated under the theme ‘Children shouldn’t work in fields, but on dreams’. Minister of State in the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Zavia Mayne (left); Country Coordinator, WINROCK International, Cheryl Ivey (centre) and Director of Child Labour in the Ministry, Sasha Deer-Gordon, participate in the road march observing World Day Against Child Labour. The march, which started at the Ministry’s 1F North Street location, ended at the St. William Grant Park in downtown Kingston. World Day Against Child Labour is observed annually on June 12 and focuses attention on the global extent of child labour and the action and efforts needed to eliminate it. The day is celebrated under the theme ‘Children shouldn’t work in fields, but on dreams’. read more

Jamaica Council for Persons With Disabilities Being Given Greater Administrative Autonomy

“What that means is that it will be able to run things its own way. Not that we are saying they won’t be accountable to anybody. But they will be placed in a position where they will be better able to take care of their own affairs, in direct consultation with [their] members,” Mr. Mayne added. Story Highlights State Minister, Hon. Zavia Mayne, says that under a newly developed regime, the JCPD will operate as body corporate. The Jamaica Council for Persons with Disabilities (JCPD) is being given greater administrative autonomy by the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, under which it falls. The Jamaica Council for Persons with Disabilities (JCPD) is being given greater administrative autonomy by the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, under which it falls.State Minister, Hon. Zavia Mayne, says that under a newly developed regime, the JCPD will operate as body corporate.“What that means is that it will be able to run things its own way. Not that we are saying they won’t be accountable to anybody. But they will be placed in a position where they will be better able to take care of their own affairs, in direct consultation with [their] members,” Mr. Mayne added.The State Minister was speaking at the final in the Ministry’s series of public consultations on the proposed Codes of Practice for Employment for persons with disabilities at the St. Mary Parish Church hall in Port Maria, St. Mary, on Wednesday (August 21).The Codes are intended to provide guidance on the engagement and facilitation of persons with disabilities in the workplace.Those individuals will be entitled to the same treatment in working environments as persons considered normal.The Codes are being developed in accordance with the Disabilities Act, which was passed in the Houses of Parliament in 2014, and will provide practical guidance on matters in the legislation.They will also provide minimum standards by which the public is guided on how to interact with and facilitate the participation of persons with special needs.Mr. Mayne said the Government is taking steps to ensure wide-ranging stakeholder consultations are held islandwide, and consensus secured, prior the Codes’ enactment.“We recognise that persons with disabilities [have] to be treated with a certain degree of sensitivity, and this is why the Act provides for all these things being proposed,” he pointed out. read more

Spectrum Management Authority Institutes Online Payment Portal

“For example, for amateur radio operators, the payment is $500, and in order to make this payment you would need to drive into Kingston from all over the country. So we thought this [online facility] would be very customer-centric,” she said. The Spectrum Management Authority (SMA) has instituted an online client payment portal.Managing Director, Dr. Maria Myers Hamilton, told JIS News that in reviewing the agency’s arrangements, it was decided to establish the system to make it more convenient for clients to pay their fees.“For example, for amateur radio operators, the payment is $500, and in order to make this payment you would need to drive into Kingston from all over the country. So we thought this [online facility] would be very customer-centric,” she said.Dr. Myers Hamilton explained that a menu of fees is listed on the Authority’s website, www.sma.gov.jm. These include amateur radio operators and citizen band radio service charges.Additionally, she said persons may also pay for a duplicate of their Spectrum licence as well as the type-approval certificate.The Managing Director noted, however, that the online system does not include detention notice payments for wireless items detained by the Jamaica Customs Agency (JCA) upon landing in the country, due to lack of type-approval certificates.Meanwhile, Dr. Myers Hamilton said the SMA is in discussions with third-party entities to facilitate payments for persons without online service access.The SMA is the regulatory body responsible for managing the radio frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in Jamaica.One of the Authority’s main functions is allocating and assigning various service frequencies, such as the amateur radio service. Story Highlights Managing Director, Dr. Maria Myers Hamilton, told JIS News that in reviewing the agency’s arrangements, it was decided to establish the system to make it more convenient for clients to pay their fees. The Spectrum Management Authority (SMA) has instituted an online client payment portal. read more

Govt Looking To Train More Dispute Resolution Mediators

Story Highlights This, according to Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, forms part of plans to significantly reduce the backlog of court cases. “The way in which fewer cases can go to the courts is for us to use alternative dispute resolution. Therefore, the Ministry will be pushing [for] the training of trainers in mediation because we need more mediators across the island. I will continue to go across the different parishes to ensure that, in every community, we can resolve disputes in a timely manner… using alternative dispute resolution,” he said, while noting that key stakeholders, such as lay magistrates, have pivotal roles to play. The Government is looking to train more alternative dispute resolution mediators.This, according to Justice Minister, Hon. Delroy Chuck, forms part of plans to significantly reduce the backlog of court cases.“The way in which fewer cases can go to the courts is for us to use alternative dispute resolution. Therefore, the Ministry will be pushing [for] the training of trainers in mediation because we need more mediators across the island. I will continue to go across the different parishes to ensure that, in every community, we can resolve disputes in a timely manner… using alternative dispute resolution,” he said, while noting that key stakeholders, such as lay magistrates, have pivotal roles to play.“We must [be able to] show results… and for our local and international partners and all of Jamaica to see results, it means that justice must be delivered in a timely way,” he emphasised.The Minister was speaking at a training seminar for judges and lay magistrates, dubbed ‘Train the Trainer Session: Lay Magistrates’ Court’, at Hilton Rose Hall Resort and Spa in Montego Bay, St. James, on Saturday (September 28).Meanwhile, Mr. Chuck reiterated the Government’s commitment to expanding and promoting restorative justice as an alternative for curbing crime. This, he said, will aid in improving the justice system’s efficiency.“Restorative justice must play its part, not only in the schools and the churches, but also the communities. We believe mediation can help Jamaicans solve the conflicts in the communities in Jamaica. We solve far too many problems with violence. This cannot be the way,” he argued.The three-day training session, which ran from September 27 to 29, was organised by the Justice Training Institute (JTI) in tandem with the Justice Undertakings for Social Transformation (JUST) Project, and National Integrity Action (NIA), under the theme ‘Learning through Shared Experience: A Model Approach to Empowering Lay Magistrates as Adjudicators’.It formed part of a strategic partnership between the Governments of Jamaica and Canada to further develop and bolster the nation’s justice sector. The Government is looking to train more alternative dispute resolution mediators. read more

Developed countries at UN say more trade can boost sustainable development

While covering a range issues, most strongly the need to end the carnage in Syria, fight terrorism and protect human rights around the world, particularly those of women and girls, the officials noted trade as an important component of sustainable development, which has been named as the priority for the 68th General Assembly session that recently opened.“A strong business sector, open trading rules and liberal foreign investment policies can foster economic growth and, with this, opportunities to achieve prosperity and security,” said Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, whose Government came into power just weeks ago.“We will support responsible economic governance and open trading systems that support export oriented economies,” Ms. Bishop said, citing her county’s long experience with economic liberalization, as well as the huge recent growth of the middle class in neighbouring Southeast Asia.“Beyond 2015, we must prioritise sustainable economic growth in the global development framework,” she added.Earlier today, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, meeting with Ms. Bishop, discussed development in Syria and Egypt as well as Pacific issues and thanked Australia for its commitment to global peace and security, welcoming its recent assumption of the presidency of the Security Council. Franciscus Cornelius Gerardus Maria Timmermans, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands. UN Photo/Paulo FilgueirasAlso speaking at the General Assembly today, Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans, of the Netherlands, said that along with more trade, the “key words” for the post-2015 agenda are better aid and stronger, unified policy coherence for sustainable development.“The post-2015 agenda will benefit from a single, unified framework: we cannot talk about the plight of the world’s poorest people in isolation from the environmental problems endangering life on the planet,” Mr. Timmermans stressed.A coherent, sustainable agenda was to strengthen the international legal order, he added, with a focus on human rights. Speaking extensively on existing international legal mechanisms, some of which are hosted by his country, as well as on the situation in Syria, he supported the proposal that permanent members of the Security Council refrain from using their vetoes to stop mass atrocities. Jean Asselborn, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs for Luxembourg. UN Photo/Ryan BrownThe Deputy Prime Minister of Luxembourg, Jean Asselborn, agreed that the post-2015 objectives for sustainable development must be integrated in a single and coherent framework that include all aspects of economic, governance, security and environmental concerns. “We cannot ignore the devastating effects of conflicts and violence on development,” he said, describing the destruction wrought in Syria and other situations.Mr. Asselborn noted, that as a current, non-permanent member of the Security Council, Luxembourg had been working with September Council President Australia to support the demands of humanitarian actors in Syria. “We must also talk – and more loudly so – about governance which is conducive to development, about institutions which guarantee the rule of law, about freedom of expression, about transparent and accountable governments. We must talk about justice, about the fight against impunity, about respect for international law.”The General Assembly’s general debate continues at UN Headquarters through 1 October. read more