NGOs Encouraged to Access Canada Fund

Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are being invited to submit proposals under the Canada Fund for Local Initiatives (CFLI) programme. Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are being invited to submit proposals under the Canada Fund for Local Initiatives (CFLI) programme.Deadline for submission of proposals is July 31 and applicants can apply for up to Can$25,000 per project.The CFLI provides support for small-scale but high-impact projects undertaken by local NGOs that align with the Government of Canada’s international assistance priorities.Canada’s High Commissioner to Jamaica, Laurie Peters, provided details of the programme while speaking on the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) television programme, ‘Get the Facts’, recently.Mrs. Peters said that the High Commission is looking for projects that focus on women and girls, empowerment and equality, environment and climate action, and growth that works for everyone, including boys and young men. She said that persons could also submit projects with emphasis on peace, security and violence prevention.“So, we are inviting local organisations to our website www.jamaica.gc.ca, and look at the application details and do send in your applications,” she urged.To qualify for the Fund, the High Commissioner said that projects must be aligned with the themes outlined.“We are looking for projects and initiatives that can be accomplished within the one-year period… . Look at right-sizing them with the funding amounts that are available. We typically fund four or five initiatives for the amount of about Can$20,000 to $25,000,” she added.In 2018, she said that funds were allocated to the Alligator Head Foundation project, which examined the water quality of the fish sanctuary in the Portland area, with the goal of implementing a water quality monitoring programme.Another project was the Sunbeam Children’s Home in St Catherine, which is working to reduce violence and communication barriers among children in institutions through mentorship, debate training and conflict resolution workshops.The High Commission also supported a project by Young Women and Men of Purpose in Mandeville. This group worked to reduce the number of young women and girls who are at risk of human trafficking, through training and equipping women and girls to start their own businesses and create employment for themselves. Deadline for submission of proposals is July 31 and applicants can apply for up to Can$25,000 per project. Story Highlights The CFLI provides support for small-scale but high-impact projects undertaken by local NGOs that align with the Government of Canada’s international assistance priorities. read more

Real Estate Board Clamping Down on Illegal Developers

The Real Estate Board (REB)/Commission of Strata Corporations (CSC) is clamping down on the number of unregistered real estate developers who are selling properties illegally. The Real Estate Board (REB)/Commission of Strata Corporations (CSC) is clamping down on the number of unregistered real estate developers who are selling properties illegally.“For the second time in 2019 we have had a conviction for an unregistered developer, and both cases are now at the sentencing process. We want to remind persons that the Real Estate Board/Commission of Strata Corporation is committed to ensuring that if developers fail to register they will answer to the law,” Chief Executive Officer of the Real Estate Board/Commission of Strata Corporations, Sandra Garrick, told JIS News.Mrs. Garrick said that in one of the cases the unregistered developer was marketing and selling units in an unregistered scheme for which the developer had not yet acquired land.“Part of the REB’s responsibility is to oversee that purchasers receive what they have contracted and that monies paid over to developers are used as the Real Estate Act prescribes, meaning the funds are put in a Trust account and not used as the developer’s personal money,” she emphasised.Mrs. Garrick is also encouraging  purchasers to do their due diligence when buying a property.“As a purchaser, the first thing you should do is ensure that the real estate developer is registered with the REB and is allowed to contract business, sell units and advertise. A list of registered developers can be found on the REB’s website and persons may call the Board to do checks,” she said.Mrs. Garrick pointed out that there are times when the REB may give a developer  tentative approval, but will not grant the developer approval to market the units.“If modification needs to be made to the covenant on a title we never allow units to be pre-marketed or pre-sold,” she said.She explained that a covenant is a contractual agreement enforceable by a court and the agreement can be phrased to prohibit certain actions on a property or safeguard the benefits derived from the leasing or sale of the property.Mrs. Garrick informed that purchasers may share copies of their contract with the REB along with a note stating the amount deposited for the purchasing of the property. This, she said,  will alert the Board that the developer is selling.“You run the risk of not being completely protected by the law when you do business with unregistered developers and losing your money. It is all well and good if everything goes okay, but if it doesn’t, it is the REB’s charge that protects you. The Board can position itself to sell the development and refund you your money or hold the developer to completing the unit, so that you can have it,” she told JIS News.Mrs. Garrick pointed out that it is in the developer’s best interest to register with the Board, as it provides credibility and allows the Board to act as a third party in staking claims on their behalf. Story Highlights Mrs. Garrick said that in one of the cases the unregistered developer was marketing and selling units in an unregistered scheme for which the developer had not yet acquired land. “For the second time in 2019 we have had a conviction for an unregistered developer, and both cases are now at the sentencing process. We want to remind persons that the Real Estate Board/Commission of Strata Corporation is committed to ensuring that if developers fail to register they will answer to the law,” Chief Executive Officer of the Real Estate Board/Commission of Strata Corporations, Sandra Garrick, told JIS News. read more