BOJ Conducts Diaspora Survey

The Bank of Jamaica (BOJ) is conducting a survey to get a deeper understanding of the diaspora’s involvement in the Jamaican economy.The survey, which will be used to inform policy decisions, will cover a broad range of topics, such as remittances, the potential sectors for investments and the types of investments that are of interest to the diaspora community.A ‘pulse’ survey was administered at the Eighth Biennial Jamaica Diaspora Conference, held recently at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown Kingston. The BOJ was one of several government entities at the ‘Government at Your Service’ pavilion at the event.Deputy Governor of the BOJ, Dr. Wayne Robinson, told JIS News that the conference provided an opportunity to engage members of the diaspora.“The responses we got are very encouraging. We have exceeded our expectations in terms of the number of responses. That is very encouraging,” he said, adding that the data collected will be analysed in order to refine the questions to be administered.Dr. Robinson revealed that a previous survey done by the BOJ had focused on the recipients of remittances.“We thought it was important to use this occasion to engage with the senders, that is, members of the diaspora,” he said.He noted that the study will garner information through different sources, such as remittance businesses. Contact will also be made with the diaspora through various associations, especially in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.Dr. Robinson said the compilation and analysis of the data should be completed by the latter part of this year.“We hope to conclude the process, probably sometime in the last quarter of this year,” he added.“The research findings will enable us to provide advice on policies that can help Jamaica to achieve its objectives, economic growth and employment, which would benefit not just Jamaicans living here but Jamaicans who are living abroad as well,” he continued.Dr. Robinson, who is in charge of Economic Policy and Research, said that the diaspora community is very important to the Jamaican economy. He noted that the annual remittances in Jamaica are running at about US$2.2 billion.“That is roughly about 16 1/2 per cent of the gross domestic product, so it is very significant,” he added.Jamaicans living abroad can contact the BOJ at 876-922-0750 or via its Facebook Page @CentralBankJA or email: [email protected] for further details. The Bank of Jamaica (BOJ) is conducting a survey to get a deeper understanding of the diaspora’s involvement in the Jamaican economy. A ‘pulse’ survey was administered at the Eighth Biennial Jamaica Diaspora Conference, held recently at the Jamaica Conference Centre in downtown Kingston. The BOJ was one of several government entities at the ‘Government at Your Service’ pavilion at the event. Story Highlights The survey, which will be used to inform policy decisions, will cover a broad range of topics, such as remittances, the potential sectors for investments and the types of investments that are of interest to the diaspora community. read more

Corporate Jamaica Encouraged to Have Workers Trained in Sign Language

The Jamaica Association for the Deaf is encouraging corporate Jamaica to have workers trained in sign language, in light of members of the deaf community experiencing difficulties when conducting transactions. Story Highlights Mrs. Sherlock Marriott-Blake said the Association offers sign language training to corporate entities at a cost, and interested entities may contact them. The Jamaica Association for the Deaf is encouraging corporate Jamaica to have workers trained in sign language, in light of members of the deaf community experiencing difficulties when conducting transactions.“If your organisation is providing a service to the public, we are encouraging you to learn sign language. Begin to help break down the discriminatory assumptions persons may have (about the deaf) by engaging with us to make your organisation deaf-friendly,” Executive Director of the Association, Kimberley Sherlock Marriott-Blake, said at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ recently.Mrs. Sherlock Marriott-Blake said the Association offers sign language training to corporate entities at a cost, and interested entities may contact them.She highlighted that sign language can be just as valuable to any organisation as a foreign language and should be perceived as such by entities.“We believe in the need for us to have more persons who can communicate with and provide services for the deaf community. The deaf community is approximately 70,000 persons across the island, and we are talking about persons of different ages who will require different services,” Mrs. Sherlock Marriott-Blake pointed out.She is also encouraging persons to volunteer with the Association.“Give of your time. If you can teach a deaf person life or entrepreneurial skills, we would love to partner with you, because there are so many skills we would like to teach our students,” Mrs. Sherlock Marriott-Blake said.Interested volunteers may email the Association at [email protected] “If your organisation is providing a service to the public, we are encouraging you to learn sign language. Begin to help break down the discriminatory assumptions persons may have (about the deaf) by engaging with us to make your organisation deaf-friendly,” Executive Director of the Association, Kimberley Sherlock Marriott-Blake, said at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ recently. read more

Police Officer Says Intl Collaboration Needed To Combat Lottery Scamming

Mr. Bailey, who is in charge of Crime, was addressing a forum for the presentation of the Caribbean Policy Research Institute (CAPRI) Report on Scamming, Gangs and Violence in Montego Bay, at the city’s Cultural Centre in St. James, on September 23. Acting Deputy Commissioner of Police, Fitz Bailey, says international collaboration is needed to combat the issue of lottery scamming, which has been plaguing the island, particularly the western region. Story Highlights The report was carried out as part of CAPRI’s ‘Transform Citizen Security A Yaad’ Project. Acting Deputy Commissioner of Police, Fitz Bailey, says international collaboration is needed to combat the issue of lottery scamming, which has been plaguing the island, particularly the western region.Mr. Bailey, who is in charge of Crime, was addressing a forum for the presentation of the Caribbean Policy Research Institute (CAPRI) Report on Scamming, Gangs and Violence in Montego Bay, at the city’s Cultural Centre in St. James, on September 23.The report was carried out as part of CAPRI’s ‘Transform Citizen Security A Yaad’ Project.Mr. Bailey emphasised that if the country is to deal with the issue of transnational organised crime, “there has to be coordination, intelligence, a quest to identify the money, track the money and seize the money. There has to be international collaboration”.“We have to ensure that there are adequate laws that are enforced and the penalty, in my view, is significant to send the message as well as to take the profit out of the crime,” he said.The Transform Citizen Security A Yaad Project was done with support from the United Kingdom (UK) Department of International Development (DFID).The project is aimed at improving the immediate and long-term security of citizens through encouraging coordinated action between relevant government institutions and civil society, informed by research and analysis.Under this project, CAPRI has conducted research which considers the purported connection between lottery scamming, gangs, and the crime rate in St. James, and reviews the measures that have been taken over the past decade to combat the challenges.For her part, Researcher at CAPRI, Joanna Callen, who presented findings from the report, highlighted that while lottery scamming continues to be a serious issue in Montego Bay, there are some recommendations that may stem the crime.“The first is to create agreed measurements and indicators of scamming among all stakeholders, national and international, against which change can be tracked,” she said.“Second, conduct a comprehensive situation analysis of scamming. This includes gathering first-hand accounts from scammers of the detailed inner workings of the crime, and the links with gangs, perhaps from convicted scammers or from embedded infiltrators into scamming groups or in gangs [involved] in scamming. These new indicators will inform the situation analysis,” Ms. Callen outlined.She added that the third recommendation is to clarify, align and coordinate all law-enforcement actors and their roles, with their responsibilities in regard to investigating and prosecuting lottery scamming and associated crimes.“This should stall duplication of efforts, make more efficient use of resources and simplify and improve cooperation with international partners,” Ms. Callen said. read more