Govt Endorses WiPay Online Payment Facility

Story Highlights WiPay, which was created in Trinidad in 2016 for e-commerce, facilitates online payment for goods and services at access points globally. It enables users to utilize apps for cashless transfers using mobile devices such as smartphones. Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Hon. Audley Shaw, and Science, Energy and Technology Minister, Hon. Fayval Williams, welcomed the facility’s introduction while speaking during the launch at the AC Marriott Kingston Hotel June 27. The Government has endorsed the newly introduced technology-driven integrated payment processing platform, WiPay. The Government has endorsed the newly introduced technology-driven integrated payment processing platform, WiPay.WiPay, which was created in Trinidad in 2016 for e-commerce, facilitates online payment for goods and services at access points globally. It enables users to utilize apps for cashless transfers using mobile devices such as smartphones.Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Hon. Audley Shaw, and Science, Energy and Technology Minister, Hon. Fayval Williams, welcomed the facility’s introduction while speaking during the launch at the AC Marriott Kingston Hotel June 27.Mr. Shaw said the technology’s addition to the growing suite of online facilities now available in Jamaica will make payments for goods and services much easier and efficient for users.He noted that WiPay will be particularly pivotal in linking farmers with buyers across the world and facilitating seamless payments for produce supplied.“We have to catch up [with the advancements globally] and technology is part of the process by which we catch up… and we must catch up fast,” he said.Mrs. Williams described WiPay as the spark of a new revolution in Jamaica, especially for persons not having access to online banking services, adding “once you begin to make online easier for people, they will begin to adopt it”.The WiPay platform can be utilized in four ways: WiPay Website Plug, which can be downloaded through via the website; a WiPAy Invoice System which can be sent by account holders with a ZWILLO app on smartphones; a WiPay account where users can upload cash for payments and a Top Up Voucher System.In July, WiPay will expand its ZWILLO app to enable customers to create their own estimates and invoices to send to clients via email and social media platforms such as Whatsapp, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.This will facilitate a recipient system which allows persons to pay with credit cards, WiPay cash voucher, or from personal bank accounts. read more

PATH Beneficiaries Encouraged to Apply for PostSecondary Grant

Story Highlights Project Director, Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH), Elsa Marks-Willis is encouraging beneficiaries to take advantage of the PATH post-Secondary Grant to assist with back-to-school expenses.This programme is for persons who are currently PATH beneficiaries and are moving on to further studies. Students must apply for the grant within two years of leaving secondary school.The grants, which are valued at $15,000 to $30,000, are available to PATH beneficiaries to re-sit Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) subjects, sit Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) subjects, or pursue Certificates, Diplomas or Associate Degrees.Application for this grant closes October 31, 2019.The grant is available to children who are registered in an approved post-secondary institution, such as HEART Trust/ NTA, sixth form or a Community College.In an interview with JIS News, Mrs. Marks-Willis said for persons pursuing post-secondary education, a letter of acceptance from the school must be presented. It should contain the child’s full name, details and duration of course from the institution. Identification for the family representative should also be presented.“You can take that to your parish office no later than October 31 and the application can be completed there,” she advised.For persons moving on to tertiary programmes and intend to enrol in the first year of a degree programme, they are eligible to apply for a tertiary grant valued at $100,000. Persons can apply for this grant through their respective institutions.“If you are moving to second, third or fourth year and you have a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.5 and over, you can also benefit from a $100,000 grant. You just need to visit the bursar’s office in the accounts department and they will provide you with the application form,” the Project Director.Mrs. Marks-Willis, who emphasised the importance of higher education to their future prospects, urged PATH beneficiaries to take advantage of these offerings to further their education.For further information, persons can visit the Ministry’s parish offices or call the Ministry of Labour and Social Security (Social Security Division): 876 922-8000-13. This programme is for persons who are currently PATH beneficiaries and are moving on to further studies. Students must apply for the grant within two years of leaving secondary school. Project Director, Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH), Elsa Marks-Willis is encouraging beneficiaries to take advantage of the PATH post-Secondary Grant to assist with back-to-school expenses. The grants, which are valued at $15,000 to $30,000, are available to PATH beneficiaries to re-sit Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) subjects, sit Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) subjects, or pursue Certificates, Diplomas or Associate Degrees. read more

The secrets of a teenagers diary were unlocked after his familys appeal

The secrets of a teenager’s First World War diary were finally unlocked after his family’s internet appeal to decode the Pitman shorthand.As a teenage boy, growing up in Hull in 1915, a 15-year-old Stanley Hooker used shorthand to document his thoughts and movements in a small pocket diary.However Mr Hooker, who lived in Barmston Street, Hull, was killed aged 18 on November 6th, 1918, having enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers.  For over 100 years the diary has remained in the family but was never read, due to the fact no one in his family read shorthand.It was earlier this month when Mr Hooker’s great-great-niece, Amy Abethell, 38, found the diary at her father’s home in Hull that she turned to Twitter for help in order to make sense of the written symbols. In one diary post the author wrote about a job rejection he received for a shorthand typist role at a bank, suggesting why he had chosen to learn the skill, which was typically used by secretaries and journalists.  Other diary entries included the everyday mundanities of life. “Another alright day. My cold is not better. Mrs Henderson didn’t come as it was raining,” one read.He also wrote about friends visiting and the state of a cold he was suffering. Amy Abethell took to twitter for help in deciphering her great-great-uncle’s shorthand Credit:WESSEX NEWS AGENCY However Ms Baird, a former shorthand teacher, observed Mr Hooker’s style had been “challenging”.“It doesn’t look like there’s anything secretive in his writing which is quite common but some parts are difficult to read,” she said.Ms Baird has since been sent some more pages of the diary to decipher and aims to transcribe one to two entries a day.She said: “Stanley’s shorthand is particularly challenging. He was only about 15 when he wrote it so I suspect he was learning at the time.”Ms Abethell added that decoding the diary had been like seeing him “coming to life over 100 years later” Calling short hand writers. This is my great great uncles diary. He died 6/11/1918. Any ideas as to what it says? pic.twitter.com/L3uFEOF499— Amy Abethell (@AmyAbethell) February 9, 2019 Ms Abethell, from Nottingham, wrote: “Calling shorthand writers. This is my great great uncle’s diary. He died on 6/11/1918. Any ideas as to what it says? There’s quite a few pages in the book.”After much excitement on Twitter she cautioned that it “might be just a shopping list”.Fortunately 64-year-old pitman expert Kathryn Baird, of Warmington, Northamptonshire, was able to decipher the code for Ms Abethell, which revealed diary entries about having a cold and doing some shopping. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Amy Abethell took to twitter for help in deciphering her great-great-uncle's shorthand  read more