The Dynamiq GTT 165 Foiling Superyacht Is the Toy Boat You Deserve

first_img 6 Fastest Cars in the World Right Now The vessel is capable of a top speed of 20 knots (25 if you spring for the beefier GTS model). For you land folk, that’s just under 30 miles per hour. While that may not seem like a “breakneck” clip, keep in mind this is a 165-foot long behemoth. For trips across the Atlantic Ocean, the GTT can sustain 17 knots. Plus, a hybrid propulsion system coupled with a rooftop solar panel array allows it to remain at anchor overnight with zero emissions and in total silence.Dynamiq is an ultra-luxury, Monaco-based shipbuilder. They’re credited as the first-ever manufacturer to design an entire category of all-aluminum, sport cruising superyachts capable of greater than 20-knot speeds and a 3,000-mile range. The entirely new class of yacht was dubbed Gran Turismo Transatlantic (hence “GTT”).The price tag? The “entry-level” GTT 165 starts at €24,400,000 (approximately USD $29.6 million). While that doesn’t include taxes, delivery fees, or the European models in the brochure, it still feels like a steal. Don’t forget to set aside an extra quarter-mil for a proper “dinghy.” 1 of 3 The Adastra Trimaran Is a Luxury Adventure Yacht Unlike Any Other Behold the World’s Most Adventure-Ready Electric Motorcycle 1 of 3 Next Previous last_img read more

Health Minister Encourages Corporate Jamaica to Develop Wellness Programmes

Story Highlights He was speaking at the awards ceremony for the National Health Fund’s (NHF) Work-it-Out weight loss Challenge at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston on Thursday (June 13). Minister of Health and Wellness, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton is encouraging corporate Jamaica to invest in the welfare of employees, by promoting health and wellness in the workplace, which will result in enhanced productivity. Minister of Health and Wellness, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton is encouraging corporate Jamaica to invest in the welfare of employees, by promoting health and wellness in the workplace, which will result in enhanced productivity.“I am issuing a challenge to corporate Jamaica to see their employees as the most valuable asset and the state of mind of those employees as the intellectual force that will drive their competitiveness and success and therefore deserves the level of investment that is necessary to make them feel motivated and healthy to do their jobs,” Dr. Tufton said.He was speaking at the awards ceremony for the National Health Fund’s (NHF) Work-it-Out weight loss Challenge at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston on Thursday (June 13).The Minister lamented that corporate Jamaica has “not yet bought in fully” to the Government’s thrust to promote health and wellness among citizens, especially at the workplace, and called for greater support from employers.“There are thousands of companies in Jamaica who all they care about is that you show up for work , work as hard as you can and after you leave work, it doesn’t matter to them….what happens to you as long as you show up the next day,” he said.Dr. Tufton suggested that employers consider bringing in a doctor once or twice a year to check the health status of employees; hiring an instructor to conduct work out sessions at the workplace at least once a week; and providing a healthier menu of options for employees.“We have to get the narrative changed, which is why we have added ‘Wellness’ to the Ministry’s portfolio to get Jamaicans to start taking more responsibility, start engaging in activities that are prevention related, prevention focused and by so doing really enjoy a better quality of life,” he said.Dr. Tufton said Jamaica has to change its ‘sick profile’ which includes one in three Jamaicans being hypertensive, high levels of obesity and seven of every 10 deaths being due to lifestyle related diseases, by taking greater responsibility for maintaining personal health.In the meantime, the Health Minister praised the participants of the competition for taking on the challenge to improve their health, and encouraged them to become “crusaders for this cause” by developing their own internal activities and getting more persons involved in the movement.Dr. Tufton said he was impressed with the results of the six-month long competition which saw 320 teams comprising 1,600 individuals from 11 parishes losing a combined total of almost 2,000 pounds.In his remarks, Chief Executive Officer of the NHF, Everton Anderson, who himself lost 12 pounds as a member of the NHF’s internal contest, said the competition, which is in its 9th staging, is in keeping with the agency’s thrust to promote healthy lifestyles among the populace, “recognizing the link between living well and being healthy, and the clear link between non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and an unhealthy lifestyle”.He noted that it yielded significant results, based on a survey of participants, which revealed that 41 per cent achieved their goals over the six months; and 90 per cent have made some positive changes in their lifestyles.The NHF implemented the Work-It-Out Challenge, a weight loss and fitness competition to encourage Jamaicans to engage in more physical activity, promote healthy eating and health checks.   The programme seeks to empower and motivate participants to increase their physical activity in their daily lives as well as increase their knowledge of healthy eating habits, regular health checks while having fun. “I am issuing a challenge to corporate Jamaica to see their employees as the most valuable asset and the state of mind of those employees as the intellectual force that will drive their competitiveness and success and therefore deserves the level of investment that is necessary to make them feel motivated and healthy to do their jobs,” Dr. Tufton said. read more

Jamaicas Climate Resilience Strengthened Under 78Million Project

The programmes, which focused on the areas of sustainable agriculture, water resource management, renewable energy and energy efficiency, were geared towards building resilience to climate change among the most vulnerable. Jamaica’s capacity to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change has been strengthened over the last three years, through three community-based pilot programmes that were implemented at a cost of approximately $78 million under the Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership Project (JCCCP). Jamaica’s capacity to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change has been strengthened over the last three years, through three community-based pilot programmes that were implemented at a cost of approximately $78 million under the Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership Project (JCCCP).The programmes, which focused on the areas of sustainable agriculture, water resource management, renewable energy and energy efficiency, were geared towards building resilience to climate change among the most vulnerable.The JCCCP, which is being implemented in eight countries in the Caribbean, aims to assist countries to enhance their capacities and capabilities in climate-change adaptation and mitigation through the development of policies and application of low-emission, climate-resilient technologies.The local component has now ended.Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Daryl Vaz, said the project was crucial given the continued impact of climate change, including stronger hurricances, and more unpredictable weather.The issue, he said, was brought starkly into focus earlier this week with the detsruction caused by Category Five Hurricane Dorian, which destroyed sections of The Bahamas, killing five persons in its wake.“Our vulnerability, therefore, to the impacts of climate change cannot be questioned and, as such, we fully recognise that we must seize every opportunity to establish partnerships to address the challenges,” he said.He was speaking at an information-sharing and closing forum for the Jamaica component of the JCCCP, at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston on Wednesday (September 4).Minister Vaz said that the project delivered tangible benefits to the target communities through the pilot initiatives.These included water harvesting infrastructure complemented with training in various aspects of climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies at over 70 locations islandwide that offer secondary and vocational training.In addition, 50 farmers in St. Ann have been direct recipients of rainwater harvesting infrastructure and awareness raising of the negative effects of climate change on their livelihoods and training in strategies to combat these negative effects.“In Clarendon, the JCCCP partnered with the Government and community groups to rehabilitate two concrete water-catchment tanks to provide potable water to communities that did not have access to water from the municipal sources,” Mr. Vaz added.Also, under other components of the project, the multisectoral Focal Point Network for advancing climate action has been strengthened; key stakeholders have collaborated to develop a Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action (NAMA) for the water sector in Jamaica; and training and awareness raising have been provided in climate-change adaptation and mitigation principles and practices through workshops, study tours and promotional campaigns.“Overall, the implementation of the JCCCP Project represents the partnerships that are necessary to advance climate action. That is the involvement of the international community, Government of Jamaica and community members working collectively to sustain and enhance livelihoods while addressing the negative impacts of climate change,” Minister Vaz said.He thanked international partners, the Government of Japan, which provided financial and technical support, and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) which was the implementing agency.In his remarks, Ambassador of Japan to Jamaica, His Excellency Hiromasa Yamazaki, said the JCCCP is part of a funding package of approximately US$16 billion over the last five years, to help developing countries mitigate and adapt to climate change.“Under that comprehensive pledge, a US$15-million grant was committed to the implementation of the JCCCP to boost Jamaica and the Caribbean region’s capacity to overcome its vulnerabilities to natural disasters,” he noted.Ambassador Yamazaki said the Government of Japan is pleased that Jamaica, through the JCCCP, has worked earnestly from the grassroots community level to the policy level, to put in place climate-smart resilient initiatives and technologies, so that the country can “gain insight, further knowledge and be empowered to tackle climate change issues as well as mitigate vulnerabilities to natural disasters”. Story Highlights The JCCCP, which is being implemented in eight countries in the Caribbean, aims to assist countries to enhance their capacities and capabilities in climate-change adaptation and mitigation through the development of policies and application of low-emission, climate-resilient technologies. read more

Landlords Encouraged To Register With The Rent Assessment Unit

Director of the Rent Assessment Unit, Shenese Headlam, is encouraging landlords to register with the Rent Assessment Unit, in light of the impending amendments under the Rent Restriction Act.“The Act is currently being amended and some fines that are in the 1983 Act will be increased, so we are encouraging persons who have not registered their properties to do so, as the fines and registration fee will be increased by more than 100 per cent,” Mrs. Headlam told JIS News.She informed that currently, the registration fee for landlords is $20.00 and the fine for failure to register rental properties with the Rent Assessment Board (RAB) is $5,000 or imprisonment.“Some commercial properties may be eligible for exemption from the Act and [they] may call us to find out how they go about doing so. Exemption from the Rent Restriction Act would mean that these entities would have to settle disputes in a court rather than through the intervention of the RAB,” Mrs. Headlam shared.She said that among the issues brought before the Board are harassment by landlords and subletting by tenants.“Section 27 of the Act states that landlords should not harass their tenants and an eviction notice must be done through a parish court judge. Tenants who find that they are being harassed by their landlord, whether through deliberate utility restrictions or other means, should report the matter to the police,” Mrs. Headlam advised.She also noted that some tenants are delinquent and that the new Act will address this.“Landlords have been complaining about clients subletting the property, and we want to inform tenants that this is a breach of their contract and is grounds for the landlord to issue an eviction letter,” Mrs. Headlam told JIS News.She explained that the purpose of the RAB is to act as an unbiased party in settling disputes between tenants and landlords as guided by the Rent Restriction Act.The current Act applies to all building land, unless such land is leased for a term of 25 years or more, and to all dwelling houses, except those that are let for boarding, let for housing pursuant to the provisions of the Housing Act or declared exempt by the Minister of Housing, pursuant to section 8 of the Act.The Act has been amended 11 times since it was enacted, the last being in 1983. Director of the Rent Assessment Unit, Shenese Headlam, is encouraging landlords to register with the Rent Assessment Unit, in light of the impending amendments under the Rent Restriction Act. Story Highlights “The Act is currently being amended and some fines that are in the 1983 Act will be increased, so we are encouraging persons who have not registered their properties to do so, as the fines and registration fee will be increased by more than 100 per cent,” Mrs. Headlam told JIS News. She informed that currently, the registration fee for landlords is $20.00 and the fine for failure to register rental properties with the Rent Assessment Board (RAB) is $5,000 or imprisonment. read more