Jamaica Chosen as Model for Caribbean Disaster Response Coordination

Jamaica is among five countries chosen by the World Food Programme (WFP) to serve as a model for the Caribbean in disaster response coordination.The others are Belize, Dominica, Guyana, and St. Lucia.WFP Head of Office for Barbados, Regis Chapman, made the disclosure while addressing the Shock-Responsive Social Protection in the Caribbean Regional Symposium in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands, on June 27.He said that the WFP, along with international development consulting firm Oxford Policy Management “is developing five case studies in the Caribbean region… as part of our efforts to build evidence of shock-responsive social protection in the Caribbean.”Speaking in an interview with JIS News, Mr. Chapman explained that the countries were selected “based on their level of linking social protection with disaster management”.He said that Jamaica “is one of the more unique cases because of the history of linking social protection with humanitarian assistance. We actually chose Jamaica to serve as a model, particularly in the areas around coordination.”Field work for the case studies has been conducted and entailed interviews with government counterparts along with other stakeholders in the areas of social protection and disaster management; visits to communities; and meetings with beneficiaries of key social protection programmes.“We are working with the ministry that oversees social protection and the ministry that oversees disaster management,” Mr. Chapman said.“The idea is to share this evidence and look to see how we can link some of the experiences across the Caribbean, so that we can learn from each other and so that Caribbean countries can provide Caribbean solutions to Caribbean problems,” he noted.Researchers are now analysing the data to submit, within a month, the findings and key recommendations to the governments of the respective countries for review.The final case studies should be ready to be shared within the next three months.Mr. Chapman said that Jamaica’s case study is also viewed “as a tool that the Government can use to look for gaps (and) how to go about addressing (them”.”The Shock-Responsive Social Protection in the Caribbean Regional Symposium provides a platform for countries across the region to share their experiences and learn from each other.It was hosted by WFP and the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) in collaboration with the government of the Turks and Caicos Islands. The event brought together regional Ministers for social protection, disaster management and tourism, and Permanent Secretaries and Heads of disaster management agencies, to share information on how to protect and assist the poor and vulnerable locally and regionally, in order to build disaster resilience. The others are Belize, Dominica, Guyana, and St. Lucia. Jamaica is among five countries chosen by the World Food Programme (WFP) to serve as a model for the Caribbean in disaster response coordination. Story Highlights WFP Head of Office for Barbados, Regis Chapman, made the disclosure while addressing the Shock-Responsive Social Protection in the Caribbean Regional Symposium in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands, on June 27. read more

Sports Medicine Specialist wants CPR Added to Curriculum

He said that the persons in teachers’ colleges will eventually become teachers and that the training should begin at that stage. Story Highlights Sports Medicine Specialist at the Heart Foundation of Jamaica (HFJ), Dr. Paul Wright, is calling for training in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to be added to the curriculum of students in tertiary institutions, particularly teachers’ colleges and at the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport.He said that the persons in teachers’ colleges will eventually become teachers and that the training should begin at that stage.“We may even expand it into schools as part of the programme, to get people learning what to do if you see somebody collapse and become unresponsive,” he said.According to Dr. Wright, when students of these institutions graduate and become teachers or coaches, they are among the main persons who will impact the lives of student athletes.In an interview with JIS News, Dr. Wright said it is imperative for persons who will be spending a considerable amount of time with student athletes to understand the importance of CPR and chest compressions, in particular, to saving a life. He added that they will also be able to transfer the knowledge of CPR to their charges.Dr. Wright was speaking against the background of the susceptibility of student athletes to sudden cardiac arrest and the need for proper measures to be put in place to mitigate the effects.“Once you train these students, they are going out into communities and into schools. People look up to teachers in communities, especially rural communities.They can also teach the young people CPR to enable them to help others if necessary,” he said.He pointed out that the cases of sudden cardiac arrest that come to the emergency room are usually similar.“Many times the story is the same, they rush in and say that when the person collapsed they called someone. We need persons to be responsive, do something, start something, because even on the way to the hospital, you can save a life,” Dr. Wright said, adding that it is less likely for someone who comes to the emergency room with a pulse to die in the emergency room.The Heart Foundation is encouraging more Jamaicans to learn CPR, which is a life-saving medical procedure that is given to someone who is in cardiac arrest.It helps to pump blood around the person’s body when the heart cannot. It is designed to support and maintain breathing until emergency medical personnel arrive and take over. “We may even expand it into schools as part of the programme, to get people learning what to do if you see somebody collapse and become unresponsive,” he said. Sports Medicine Specialist at the Heart Foundation of Jamaica (HFJ), Dr. Paul Wright, is calling for training in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to be added to the curriculum of students in tertiary institutions, particularly teachers’ colleges and at the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport. read more