Hudson County Executive Tours New Hudson County Community College Student Center…

first_imgPictured at the tour in the foreground from left: Lisa Dougherty, HCCC Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment; Jasmine Ngin, SGA Director of Finance; Pamela Gardner, HCCC Trustee; Thomas DeGise, Hudson County Executive; Dr. Chris Reber, HCCC President; and students Tyler Sarmiento, Koral Booth, and Suleiny Rodriguez. Pictured in the background from left: Dr. Nicholas Chiaravollati, HCCC Vice President for External Affairs and Senior Counsel to the President; Veronica Gerosimo, HCCC Assistant Dean, Student Life and Leadership; Warren Rigby, 2019-2020 SGA President; Dr. David Clark, HCCC Associate Dean of Student Affairs; and Christian Rodriguez, SGA President ×Pictured at the tour in the foreground from left: Lisa Dougherty, HCCC Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment; Jasmine Ngin, SGA Director of Finance; Pamela Gardner, HCCC Trustee; Thomas DeGise, Hudson County Executive; Dr. Chris Reber, HCCC President; and students Tyler Sarmiento, Koral Booth, and Suleiny Rodriguez. Pictured in the background from left: Dr. Nicholas Chiaravollati, HCCC Vice President for External Affairs and Senior Counsel to the President; Veronica Gerosimo, HCCC Assistant Dean, Student Life and Leadership; Warren Rigby, 2019-2020 SGA President; Dr. David Clark, HCCC Associate Dean of Student Affairs; and Christian Rodriguez, SGA President “This building represents a milestone for Hudson County Community College as it is the first, dedicated Student Center in the College’s 47-year history,” Dr. Reber stated. “We are exceedingly grateful to County Executive DeGise, the County Commissioners, HCCC Trustees, and everyone who assisted in making this dream a reality for our students.”Dr. Reber said the $8.2 million renovation to a College-owned building was designed byDi Cara| Rubino Architects to create a state-of-the-art setting that affords students the very best in technology, safety and convenience. The renovation by APS Contracting, Inc. included the addition of façade brick stained to match that of the adjoining HCCC Gabert Library; replacement of the existing roof; complete interior demolition; the addition of a new entrance vestibule; installation of new HVAC systems, elevators, emergency generator; and a direct, indoor connection to the Gabert Library. Wi Fi and computer stations are available throughout the building, as are “green” elements for energy efficiency and the sustainability of resources.The HCCC Student Center’s first floor includes Student Lounges, Student Welcome Center, full-service Café, Veterans’ Lounge, and Security Command Center. The second floor houses offices for Student Life, Student Government and a variety of other student organizations, as well as an Open Lounge, and a large, Multipurpose Room for events and meetings. The office of the College’s Security, Custodial and Facilities Departments, and storage space are located on the lower level.The new HCCC Student Center is the latest of several construction projects undertaken by HCCC that have transformed Journal Square. It is representative of the College’s mission to serve its diverse communities with inclusive educational programs and services that promote student success, socioeconomic mobility, and provide resources for growth. Students can meet outside the classroom, share ideas and values, assist and advise one another, pursue career and employment opportunities, develop better understanding of diverse cultures, and build longstanding relationships.The project was financed with Chapter 12 funding, a state program for county colleges that is funded through State and County capital bond financing. All of the College’s capital improvement endeavors have been completed with appropriated capital. As a result, the College does not carry any capital debt, and not one dollar of student tuition is utilized for debt.center_img Recently, Hudson County Community College (HCCC) students and staff provided Hudson County Executive Thomas A. DeGise with a tour of the recently completed Student Center at 81 Sip Avenue in Jersey City.HCCC President Dr. Chris Reber and Mr. DeGise were joined by students and administrators in a tour of the renovated building, which was completed last March just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown.last_img read more

Men’s basketball: Returning Badgers use last year’s loss against Kentucky as motivation in rematch

first_imgHayes said that occurrence is “Exhibit A” of the inspiration behind the “Make ‘Em Believe” t-shirts and motto that have fueled the 2014-15 season.Now, the Badgers find themselves face-to-face with Kentucky again, no doubt invoking the memories from last season’s game. Gasser knows that while Harrison’s shot was the deciding factor, it’s not the sole reason the Badgers lost.“We were literally one possession away from a national championship,” Gasser said. “It wasn’t necessarily the last couple of possessions, it could’ve been throughout the entire 40-minute game.“Obviously it’s a heartbreaking loss, but it makes this year’s team what it is. You just gotta take the positives of it.”Especially this week, the Badgers have more pertinent tasks to tend to, Hayes said.“That play is a year behind us,” Hayes said. “And we have more important things, like the games ahead of us, to focus on.”The task is Kentucky, and a win Saturday night could erase the bad memories from April 5, 2014 from the Badgers’ minds forever. Josh Gasser’s alarm goes off at 6:30 a.m. in the middle of the season. It’s time to wake up and head over to the Kohl Center training facilities for lift.What propels Gasser and his teammates out of bed? Is it their overall work ethic and desire to get better? Absolutely.But they also do it for April 5, 2014.Because no matter how hard the Badgers of the 2013-14 Final Four team try to push the memory of that day out of their heads, it will always be there, and it has served as motivation for this year’s Wisconsin men’s basketball team.From that day, it is one particular moment that’s especially painful. It’s when Kentucky guard Aaron Harrison elevates from close to 30 feet away over the outstretched hand of Gasser and nails a three-pointer with 5.7 seconds left to put the Wildcats up one and send his team to the national championship game.“You try not to think about it much. It’s one of those games and moments that you just don’t want to think about, but unfortunately sometimes it creeps in your head a little bit,” Gasser, a fifth-year senior, said. “It’s something that we’ve just put on the back burner and moved on from it, and I think we’ve done a good job of learning from a game like that and pushing the momentum forward and learning from it and getting better from it.”Gasser, a student of the game who takes preparation and scouting seriously, said he’s never watched film of the game.Sophomore forward Nigel Hayes wishes he could erase April 5, 2014 from his memory too.Hayes scored only two points in seven minutes in a year he had been named Big Ten Sixth Man of the Year, averaging 7.7 points and 17.4 minutes per game.“I feel that I didn’t contribute to the team in a way that I should have,” Hayes said. “As I’ve said before, all I had to do was be average statistically, but I was below average.”The loss to Kentucky stuck with Hayes on an individual level, as it inspired his rigorous workouts over the summer, he said. The work has clearly translated into improvement, as he now averages 12.4 points per game.Hayes put the work in to be ready next time he found himself in a situation like last season.“I worked hard in order to make sure that I was better,” Hayes said. “So that if I’m in that situation again, and here we are in the exact same situation as last year, that I would be able to perform better.”Junior forward Sam Dekker wishes he could forget April 5, 2014.Instead, he didn’t allow himself to, by transporting the chair he used in the locker room during last season’s Final Four in Arlington, Texas back to the Badgers’ locker room in Madison.A locker room renovation displaced the chair (Dekker has no idea where it is), but it served an important purpose.“It sucks,” Dekker said of losing his chair. “A, that was kind of a cool chair, and B, I used because that was my shrine from the Final Four, remembering we gotta get back.”Frank Kaminsky wishes he could forget April 5, 2014.For Kaminsky, the hangover from the game lasted the first few weeks following the final buzzer. But once workouts and preparation for this season started, he used the loss as a motivating factor.“I haven’t really thought about it much this season because we’ve focused on getting back to the Final Four,” Kaminsky said. “But now is the time where you can remember a moment like that and try to make sure it doesn’t happen again.”There’s outside motivation too, like this tweet from ESPN talk show host Bomani Jones, which he posted after fifth-year senior Duje Dukan sent out a picture of Wisconsin receiving its Final Four rings.last_img read more

The genes that make seahorses so weird

first_imgSeahorses are bizarre little ocean anomalies, from their tube-shaped snouts to their prehensile tails. Perhaps their most unusual trait: It’s the males that give birth. Now, for the first time, a research team has begun to investigate the genetic basis for these evolutionary oddities, by sequencing and analyzing the genome of a male tiger tail seahorse (Hippocampus comes) and comparing it with the DNA of other bony fish species. The seahorse species, the team reports today in Nature, evolved at a faster rate than its ancestors, leading to key genetic changes. For example, the tiger tail lacks most of the genes that influence enamel development; instead of teeth, its jaws have fused into a tubular snout and tiny mouth, suitable for slurping up food from the sea floor. And although most fish depend on their sense of smell for survival, H. comes has relatively few smell-related genes. The tiger tail and related seahorses also lack the genes for pelvic fins—which might explain their elongated tails and bony body armor. But H. comes does have an abundance of one gene: Dubbed Pastrisacin, the gene is associated with male pregnancy, and the seahorse genome contains six copies of it.last_img read more