Lew Wallace statue dedicated in Brookville

first_imgBrookville, In. — On Sunday, May 19 the statue of Lew Wallace was dedicated on the Franklin County Courthouse lawn in Brookville. Wallace was born in Brookville in 1827 and is credited with helping to defend the city of Cincinnati during the Civil War.The project was funded by a grant received by the Franklin County Historical Society and managed by Wayne Bauer. The ceremony was highlighted by the 11th Indiana Infantry Company D, Civil War re-enactors.Wayne BauerIn 1846 he was a member of Zachary Taylor’s Army, he mustered out in 1847 as a first lieutenant and did not see combat. After law school, he served as a prosecuting attorney in Indiana’s first congressional district and also served in the Indiana Senate as a Democrat.Wallace returned to the military following the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter. He participated in the battle at Shiloh and in 1862 successfully repelled an attack on Cincinnati by “Braxton Bragg’s Incursion.” Wallace also participated in the defense against John Hunt Morgan’s raid into southern Indiana.He was a diplomat, author and inventor later in life. He died at the age of 77 in Crawfordsville, Indiana.Terry Fergason, Lew Wallace impersonatorHis maternal grandfather, John Test was a circuit court judge and U.S. Congressman and his father was a graduate of the United States Military Academy, served in the Indiana General Assembly, Indiana Lt. Governor and Governor.last_img read more

Student protests voice anger with Trump victory

first_imgProtests have erupted on campus and in the greater Los Angeles community in the wake of Tuesday night’s election results, which propelled Donald Trump to the presidency.Early on Wednesday morning just after the results were announced, nearly 150 USC students held a spontaneous protest near Tommy Trojan. One student called for students to oppose an oppressive system that discriminates against minorities.“We’re not against white people – we’re against white supremacy, the white supremacists and patriarchy,” one student said. “We’re going to have to wake up and take back our country for the people, not for these political parties, not for Democrats and Republicans, to free people from oppression.”On Wednesday night, hundreds of people circled around the Los Angeles City Hall, going on the freeway, waving anti-trump posters and chanting “F-ck Donald Trump,” drowning out car honks. The event organized by individuals from the Answer Coalition was aimed at protesting Donald Trump’s presidential win.After circling the City Hall building, the crowd, composed mostly of students and young adults, stopped in front of it and began chanting slogans such as, “Hey hey ho ho Donald trump has got to go,” “Not my president” and “No KKK, No fascist USA, No Trump.” Posters contained messages such as “Stand with immigrants, black lives, Muslims, LGBTQ people, and low-wage workers.”One protester sported a Guy Fawkes mask, while others brandished pig masks and even Trump’s decapitated head on a stick. A few people climbed on top of the traffic pole, waving the Mexican and American flags, almost lighting the latter on fire before someone else in the crowd stopped them, saying that the protest was about love and not hate.A megaphone was passed around, giving people a chance to voice how they felt.“I’m the child of immigrants, and I got pregnant at 16, and I was lucky enough to get an abortion, and I didn’t have anyone challenge my rights,” said one young woman present at the event. “But I still had [people] follow me to my mother’s car and scream in my face when I was having the worst day of my life. I have never ever regretted that decision. [Support] reproductive rights!”Several USC students attended the rally as well, including senior Beatrix Lu.“I think it’s really important to show that Trump is not a president for all the people like he said he would be,” Lu said. “Even though a democratic transition is the hallmark of our democracy, that’s why we’re here protesting, as is our right, as opposed to violently being in the streets. We are here to show him that love does trump hate,” Lu said.According to Lu, the goal of the protest was to show that people Trump has insulted throughout the campaign would not allow his win to silence them.“The problem with Trump is that no one knows what his policies actually are, because he is a demagogue and he tended to flip-flop on everything, but we reject that our lives do not matter to him, as women, as queers and as people of color,” Lu said.Junior Michelle Montepiedra, who majors in international relations, also voiced her opposition to Trump’s presidency.“I and a lot of students have more knowledge than Donald Trump, and I don’t think that’s right, where we’re college students and we know more than our president,” Montepiedra said. “I hope I can make my voice heard and amplify the other voices here.”last_img read more