Vermont unemployment rate stays at 6.7 percent, 800 jobs added

first_imgThirty states and the District of Columbia recorded over-the-month unemployment rate increases, 9 states registered rate decreases, and 11 states had no rate change, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the year, jobless rates increased in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The national unemployment rate fell from 10.0 percent in December to 9.7 percent in January, but was up from 7.7 percent a year earlier. In January, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 31 states and the District of Columbia, decreased in 17 states, and remained unchanged in two states. The largest over-the-month increase in employment occurred in California (+32,500), followed by Illinois (+26,000), New York (+25,500), Washington (+18,900), and Minnesota (+15,600). The District of Columbia experienced the largest over-the-month percentage increase in employment (+1.0 percent), followed by Alaska (+0.9 percent), Washington (+0.7 percent), Minnesota and Utah (+0.6 percent each), and Illinois (+0.5 percent). The largest over-the-month decreases in employment occurred in Missouri and Ohio (-12,800 each), followed by Kentucky (-11,800), New Jersey (-9,100), Florida (-6,100), and Nevada (-5,700). Kentucky (-0.7 percent) experienced the largest over-the- month percentage decrease in employment, followed by Missouri and Nevada (-0.5 percent each), and Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi, and Ohio (-0.3 percent each). Over the year, nonfarm employment decreased in 48 states and increased in 2 states and the District of Columbia. The largest over-the-year percentage decreases occurred in Nevada (-6.9 percent), Arizona (-5.4 percent), Wyoming (-5.0 percent), and Cali- fornia (-4.8 percent).Regional Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)In January, the West reported the highest regional jobless rate, 10.8 percent, while the Northeast recorded the lowest rate, 9.1 percent. The South and West experienced statistically significant over-the- month rate changes (+0.2 percentage point each). Over the year, all four regions registered significant rate increases, the largest of which were in the South and West (+2.2 percentage points each). (See table 1.) Among the nine geographic divisions, the Pacific continued to report the highest jobless rate, 11.7 per-cent in January. The East North Central recorded the next highest rate, 11.3 percent. The West North Central registered the lowest January jobless rate, 7.2 percent, followed by the West South Central, 8.0 percent. The Pacific rate, as well as the South Atlantic rate (10.3 percent), set new series highs. (All region, division, and state series begin in 1976.) Four divisions experienced statistically significant unemployment rate increases from a month earlier, the largest of which were in New England and the South Atlantic (+0.2 percentage point each). All nine divisions reported significant over-the-year rate increases of at least 0.8 percentage point. The largest of these occurred in the East North Central and Pacific (+2.4 percentage points each).State Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)Michigan again recorded the highest unemployment rate among the states, 14.3 percent in January. The states with the next highest rates were Nevada, 13.0 percent; Rhode Island, 12.7 percent; South Carolina, 12.6 percent; and California, 12.5 percent. North Dakota continued to register the lowest jobless rate, 4.2 percent in January, followed by Nebraska and South Dakota, 4.6 and 4.8 percent, respectively. The rates in California and South Carolina set new series highs, as did the rates in three other states: Florida (11.9 percent), Georgia (10.4 percent), and North Carolina (11.1 percent). The rate in the District of Columbia (12.0 percent) also set a new series high. In total, 25 states posted jobless rates significantly lower than the U.S. figure of 9.7 percent, 11 states and the District of Columbia had measurably higher rates, and 14 states had rates that were not appreciably different from that of the nation. (See tables A and 3 and chart 1.) Six states reported statistically significant over-the-month unemployment rate increases in January. New Mexico experienced the largest of these (+0.3 percentage point), followed by California, Florida, Idaho, and Utah (+0.2 point each) and Maryland (+0.1 point). The remaining 44 states and the District of Columbia registered jobless rates that were not appreciably different from those of a month earlier, though some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant changes. West Virginia and Nevada recorded the largest jobless rate increases from January 2009 (+3.5 and +3.4 percentage points, respectively). Six other states reported rate increases of 3.0 percentage points or more: Florida, Illinois, and Wyoming (+3.2 points each), Rhode Island (+3.1 points), and Alabama and Michigan (+3.0 points each). The District of Columbia also registered a large over-the-year unemployment rate increase (+3.6 percentage points). Thirty-five additional states had smaller, but also statistically significant, rate increases. The remaining seven states reported jobless rates that were not appre- ciably different from those of a year earlier. (See table B.)Nonfarm Payroll Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)Between December 2009 and January 2010, 11 states experienced statistically significant changes in employment, 9 of which were increases. The largest statistically significant job gains occurred in California (+32,500), Illinois (+26,000), and New York (+25,500). Statistically significant decreases in employment occurred in Missouri (-12,800) and Kentucky (-11,800). (See tables C and 5.) Over the year, 48 states experienced statistically significant changes in employment, all of which were decreases. The largest statistically significant job losses occurred in California (-701,700), Florida (-303,200), Texas (-287,800), Ohio (-222,000), and Illinois (-219,700). The smallest statistically significant decreases in employment occurred in Vermont (-4,500), South Dakota (-8,100), and New Hampshire (-8,700). (See table D.)Table A. States with unemployment rates significantly differ-ent from that of the U.S., January 2010, seasonally adjusted————————————————————– State | Rate(p)————————————————————–United States (1) ……………….| 9.7 |Alaska …………………………| 8.5Arkansas ……………………….| 7.6California ……………………..| 12.5Colorado ……………………….| 7.4District of Columbia …………….| 12.0Florida ………………………..| 11.9Hawaii …………………………| 6.9Illinois ……………………….| 11.3Iowa …………………………..| 6.6Kansas …………………………| 6.4 |Louisiana ………………………| 7.4Maine ………………………….| 8.2Maryland ……………………….| 7.5Michigan ……………………….| 14.3Minnesota ………………………| 7.3Montana ………………………..| 6.8Nebraska ……………………….| 4.6Nevada …………………………| 13.0New Hampshire …………………..| 7.0New Mexico ……………………..| 8.5 |New York ……………………….| 8.8North Carolina ………………….| 11.1North Dakota ……………………| 4.2Ohio …………………………..| 10.8Oklahoma ……………………….| 6.7Oregon …………………………| 10.7Pennsylvania ……………………| 8.8Rhode Island ……………………| 12.7South Carolina ………………….| 12.6South Dakota ……………………| 4.8 |Tennessee ………………………| 10.7Texas ………………………….| 8.2Utah …………………………..| 6.8Vermont ………………………..| 6.7Virginia ……………………….| 6.9Wisconsin ………………………| 8.7Wyoming ………………………..| 7.6————————————————————– 1 Data are not preliminary. p = preliminary.Table B. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changesfrom January 2009 to January 2010, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————- | Rate | |———–|———–| Over-the-year State | January | January | rate change(p) | 2009 | 2010(p) |————————————————————————-Alabama ……………………| 8.1 | 11.1 | 3.0Alaska …………………….| 7.1 | 8.5 | 1.4Arizona ……………………| 8.0 | 9.2 | 1.2Arkansas …………………..| 6.5 | 7.6 | 1.1California …………………| 9.7 | 12.5 | 2.8Connecticut ………………..| 7.1 | 9.0 | 1.9Delaware …………………..| 7.0 | 9.0 | 2.0District of Columbia ………..| 8.4 | 12.0 | 3.6Florida ……………………| 8.7 | 11.9 | 3.2Georgia ……………………| 8.4 | 10.4 | 2.0 | | |Hawaii …………………….| 6.0 | 6.9 | .9Idaho ……………………..| 6.7 | 9.3 | 2.6Illinois …………………..| 8.1 | 11.3 | 3.2Iowa ………………………| 5.2 | 6.6 | 1.4Kansas …………………….| 5.6 | 6.4 | .8Kentucky …………………..| 9.1 | 10.7 | 1.6Louisiana ………………….| 5.7 | 7.4 | 1.7Maine ……………………..| 7.3 | 8.2 | .9Maryland …………………..| 6.1 | 7.5 | 1.4Massachusetts ………………| 7.1 | 9.5 | 2.4 | | |Michigan …………………..| 11.3 | 14.3 | 3.0Mississippi ………………..| 8.2 | 10.9 | 2.7Missouri …………………..| 8.1 | 9.5 | 1.4Montana ……………………| 5.6 | 6.8 | 1.2Nevada …………………….| 9.6 | 13.0 | 3.4New Hampshire ………………| 5.2 | 7.0 | 1.8New Jersey …………………| 7.5 | 9.9 | 2.4New Mexico …………………| 5.9 | 8.5 | 2.6New York …………………..| 7.1 | 8.8 | 1.7North Carolina ……………..| 9.2 | 11.1 | 1.9 | | |Ohio ………………………| 8.6 | 10.8 | 2.2Oklahoma …………………..| 5.0 | 6.7 | 1.7Pennsylvania ……………….| 6.8 | 8.8 | 2.0Rhode Island ……………….| 9.6 | 12.7 | 3.1South Carolina ……………..| 10.0 | 12.6 | 2.6South Dakota ……………….| 4.3 | 4.8 | .5Tennessee ………………….| 9.1 | 10.7 | 1.6Texas ……………………..| 6.4 | 8.2 | 1.8Utah ………………………| 5.6 | 6.8 | 1.2Virginia …………………..| 5.7 | 6.9 | 1.2 | | |Washington …………………| 7.5 | 9.3 | 1.8West Virginia ………………| 5.8 | 9.3 | 3.5Wisconsin ………………….| 7.1 | 8.7 | 1.6Wyoming ……………………| 4.4 | 7.6 | 3.2————————————————————————- p = preliminary.Table C. States with statistically significant employment changes fromDecember 2009 to January 2010, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————– | December | January | Over-the-month State | 2009 | 2010(p) | change(p)————————————————————————–Alaska……………………| 321,500 | 324,400 | 2,900California………………..| 13,809,600 | 13,842,100 | 32,500District of Columbia……….| 701,300 | 708,000 | 6,700Illinois………………….| 5,558,200 | 5,584,200 | 26,000Kentucky………………….| 1,766,000 | 1,754,200 | -11,800Minnesota…………………| 2,620,200 | 2,635,800 | 15,600Missouri………………….| 2,663,200 | 2,650,400 | -12,800New York………………….| 8,460,900 | 8,486,400 | 25,500Utah……………………..| 1,178,000 | 1,185,100 | 7,100Virginia………………….| 3,602,600 | 3,616,100 | 13,500Washington………………..| 2,775,100 | 2,794,000 | 18,900————————————————————————– p = preliminary.Table D. States with statistically significant employment changes fromJanuary 2009 to January 2010, seasonally adjusted————————————————————————– | January | January | Over-the-year State | 2009 | 2010(p) | change(p)————————————————————————–Alabama…………………..| 1,932,300 | 1,850,200 | -82,100Arizona…………………..| 2,519,600 | 2,382,300 | -137,300Arkansas………………….| 1,183,100 | 1,155,600 | -27,500California………………..| 14,543,800 | 13,842,100 | -701,700Colorado………………….| 2,310,400 | 2,206,100 | -104,300Connecticut……………….| 1,662,900 | 1,610,400 | -52,500Delaware………………….| 424,600 | 410,800 | -13,800Florida…………………..| 7,447,500 | 7,144,300 | -303,200Georgia…………………..| 3,974,600 | 3,815,900 | -158,700Hawaii……………………| 604,800 | 585,100 | -19,700 | | |Idaho…………………….| 626,900 | 603,100 | -23,800Illinois………………….| 5,803,900 | 5,584,200 | -219,700Indiana…………………..| 2,855,600 | 2,756,800 | -98,800Iowa……………………..| 1,501,600 | 1,463,400 | -38,200Kansas……………………| 1,380,800 | 1,321,500 | -59,300Kentucky………………….| 1,796,400 | 1,754,200 | -42,200Louisiana…………………| 1,929,000 | 1,882,600 | -46,400Maine…………………….| 604,700 | 588,900 | -15,800Maryland………………….| 2,554,000 | 2,492,100 | -61,900Massachusetts……………..| 3,230,200 | 3,138,000 | -92,200 | | |Michigan………………….| 3,961,700 | 3,850,600 | -111,100Minnesota…………………| 2,710,300 | 2,635,800 | -74,500Mississippi……………….| 1,118,100 | 1,083,600 | -34,500Missouri………………….| 2,734,700 | 2,650,400 | -84,300Montana…………………..| 435,300 | 424,000 | -11,300Nebraska………………….| 956,700 | 934,500 | -22,200Nevada……………………| 1,200,200 | 1,117,700 | -82,500New Hampshire……………..| 635,600 | 626,900 | -8,700New Jersey………………..| 3,952,400 | 3,849,600 | -102,800New Mexico………………..| 829,100 | 803,500 | -25,600 | | |New York………………….| 8,669,600 | 8,486,400 | -183,200North Carolina…………….| 4,008,500 | 3,894,300 | -114,200Ohio……………………..| 5,207,600 | 4,985,600 | -222,000Oklahoma………………….| 1,577,600 | 1,517,700 | -59,900Oregon……………………| 1,658,900 | 1,591,600 | -67,300Pennsylvania………………| 5,707,100 | 5,563,800 | -143,300Rhode Island………………| 468,800 | 452,700 | -16,100South Carolina…………….| 1,859,200 | 1,815,300 | -43,900South Dakota………………| 408,200 | 400,100 | -8,100Tennessee…………………| 2,690,700 | 2,587,000 | -103,700 | | |Texas…………………….| 10,521,500 | 10,233,700 | -287,800Utah……………………..| 1,218,300 | 1,185,100 | -33,200Vermont…………………..| 300,800 | 296,300 | -4,500Virginia………………….| 3,697,200 | 3,616,100 | -81,100Washington………………..| 2,902,900 | 2,794,000 | -108,900West Virginia……………..| 755,100 | 731,100 | -24,000Wisconsin…………………| 2,817,600 | 2,704,000 | -113,600Wyoming…………………..| 295,300 | 280,600 | -14,700————————————————————————– p = preliminary. The Vermont Department of Labor announced today that the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for January 2010 was 6.7 percent, unchanged from the revised December rate and up 0.5 point from a year ago. After our annual benchmark revision process, Vermont s unemployment rate remained unchanged and has been on the decline since May of 2009, said Patricia Moulton Powden, Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Labor. With the exception of last month, seasonally adjusted jobs have been on a very slow, but positive growth pattern since September, 2009.Seasonal Job GrowthDuring this past decade unadjusted job counts have fallen an average of 8,100 jobs from December to January. This year we saw a decline of only 7,550 or -2.5%, a slightly better than average performance. The annual rate of unadjusted job growth improved to -1.6%, largely as a result of the annual benchmark revision process. Almost all of the seasonal job gains came from Leisure & Hospitality, (2,400 jobs or 7.0%). The largest seasonal declines were observed in Retail Trade, (-2,050 or -5.4%) Construction, (-1,150 or -10.1%) Professional & Business Services, (-1,150 or -5.2%), and Education & Health Services, (-600 or -1.0%).When seasonally adjusted, January payroll jobs grew by 800 jobs or 0.3% over December. This growth was led by the Leisure & Hospitality sector, (1,300 jobs or 3.9%) and the Health Care & Social Assistance sector, (700 or 1.5%). Manufacturing, (-700 or -2.3%) and the Government sector, (-900 or -1.6%) led job losses. It should be noted that most of the government sector loss was in local government and could be due to the timing of the January vacation period.Employment GrowthVermont s January seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remained steady at 6.7% as a result of an increase of 1,400 in the number of employed and an essentially unchanged level of unemployed. After the benchmark revision process, the four-tenths increase we reported in December did not occur. For comparison purposes, the US seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for January was 9.7 percent, a decline of three-tenths of a point from December, 2009.January unemployment rates for Vermont s 17 labor market areas ranged from 5.0 percent in Hartford to 11.0 percent in Newport. Local labor market area unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted. For comparison, the January unadjusted unemployment rate for Vermont was 7.5 percent, up nine-tenths of a point from December 2009 and up 0.4 points from a year ago. The January unadjusted unemployment rate estimate was statistically different from the December value.Annual Benchmark RevisionEach year in January we perform a benchmark revision of the CES (Current Employment Statistics) job counts and the LAUS (Local Areal Unemployment Statistics) employment and unemployment estimates. In the case of CES, we replace survey data with actual job counts from our Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) through the third quarter of 2009 and then we reestimate fourth quarter 2009 jobs using this new information. Since CES job counts are part of the LAUS unemployment model, we also revise the unemployment series for the year.This year our CES and LAUS revisions were much larger than normal, partly because of the rapidly changing economy and partly due to methodology changes imposed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics that had the impact of overestimating job loss in the fourth quarter of 2008 and the first quarter of 2009. This, in turn, had the impact of overestimating our unemployment rate for the first two quarters of 2009.As we move forward we can expect small sample states like Vermont to exhibit a higher degree of variability in month to month job estimates in the CES program. As a result of this change in methodology, caution should be used in interpreting a single month s results. CES payroll job numbers are now best understood in the context of their movement over several months as opposed to observed changes in a single month estimate.Starting in January 2010 the LAUS program unemployment estimates will include a new statistical smoothing component that should reduce unexplainable large increases and decreases in the state s unemployment rate.Recent economic data suggest that the national economy and perhaps the Vermont economy has softened after several months of expansion. For instance, monthly tax revenue receipts in Vermont released Monday showed an unexpected decline, further complicating budget-balancing efforts in the Legislature. Vermont’s unemployment rate was 6.2 percent in January 2009. The state still lost 4,500 jobs over the same time last year.last_img read more

Spy Seal The CortenSteel Phoenix

first_img Buy This Comic: MAN-EATERS #1Buy This Comic: Twisted Romance Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. “Journey into the thrilling world of international espionage as one of Britain’s most covert MI-6 divisions, the Nest, recruits a brand-new secret agent to their team: Spy Seal! Follow the newbie spy and his furry colleagues on exciting train rides, high-speed car chases, high-flying air adventures, and down secret underground tunnels, all in an effort to hunt down a dangerous British-turned-Soviet double agent—a slippery spy who poses as an upscale art dealer while covertly killing off important figures of Parliament. What is the reasoning behind this double agent’s terrorist actions? Why are three masked bunny rabbits vandalizing paintings at every London gallery? And just what is this elusive Corten-Steel Phoenix anyway?”Spy Seal Vol. 1: The Corten-Steel PhoenixCreated by (W+A): Rich TommasoWith cool spies like James Bond and the Kingsman in the spotlight, we always look for the newest secret agent to grace us with their presence, and Spy Seal deserves that light. Created, written and drawn by Rich Tommaso, he allows us into this world of anthropomorphic espionage, and it’s unlike anything you’ll ever read.via Image ComicsRich Tommaso creates a story that’s not only in the homage to James Bond but separates itself from most of the Bond stereotypes entirely. Tommaso produces a spy story that engrosses you. He doesn’t let up with the action or narrative. Keeping a consistent and stable story mixed with unpredictable “what’s going to happen” narrative. Tommaso lets it happen within the panels. He plays out before you in jazz-like movement. Scattered and constant. Tommaso writes a spy story that not only twists and turns, but the reader becomes just as into the adventures as Malcolm is.He creates a brand new type of spy with Malcolm as the lead. Malcolm is very fresh to all of this. He’s still clumsy, blissfully unaware, distracted by the little things. However, he’s on the road to figure out that this is what he’s unusually great at. It’s almost a bit coming-of-age in a sense but coming-of-age as a spy who he is coming into his own.via Image ComicsSpy Seal has a look that is original and will honestly appeal to some and deter others. Tommaso gives Spy Seal a style resembling the stylised 1960s version of Mad Men meets James Bond. You have that look and feel of The Adventures of Tintin meeting art deco and pop art.Tommaso keeps things minimal on the details. Only giving you the bare features in his art, but that’s what makes this world so crafty, different and inviting. Tommaso’s lines are what make this story visually appealing, and his earth-toned colors come after. With the lines being so clean and straightforward, there are no distractions. It’s focused on the creative and pleasantly small details within the world that you should pay attention to, the narrative of the story and the adventures Malcolm.via Image ComicsIf there’s one thing that this comic does so well in doing is creating movement. I said before that this was almost like jazz. Within the panels, the action throughout is so smooth. You look from one panel to the next blown away by the detail he puts to keep the continuous flow. Spy Seal almost reads like storyboards. They produce different angles of a subject or character in various ways to catch your eye. They can also serve with giving you a passage of time.Spy Seal: The Corten-Steel Phoenix is a comic that should be on everyone lips. Spy Seal is a comic I’d love to see as a series in the veins of Tintin but kept in this style. It’s gripping and utterly stunning in its art and brilliant in its narrative. Spy Seal: The Corten: Steel Phoenix will be available January 24th at Comixology and your local comic shop.center_img Stay on targetlast_img read more