The greatest centres of all time: Yannick Jauzion

first_imgPower, athleticism and elegant skill, made French centre Yannick Jauzion, one of the greats Major teams: Colomiers, Toulouse


Country: France

Test span: 2003-11
France caps: 73 (65 starts)

Test points: 103 (20T, 1DG)The professional era has seen midfields crowded with mighty collisions between hulking figures on a quest to cross the all-important gain-line. Standing just shy of 6ft 4in and weighing around 17st, Yannick Jauzion didn’t want for size.He traded Colomiers for neighbours Toulouse in 2002, a year after making his debut for France in a wonderful 32-23 win over South Africa at Ellis Park.He would become a totem wearing black and red under Guy Noves, inspiring three Top 14 titles in 2008, 2011 and 2012 as well as a trio of Heineken Cup crowns in 2003, 2005 and 2010. A master of the offload who also hit incisive running lines, Jauzion was the unfussy facilitator around which a team could mould their attacking approach. TAGS: The Greatest Players LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Indeed, though a 73-Test France career yielded 20 tries, his smooth distribution and ability to free his arms in the contact area to find onrushing team-mates were more significant attributes. Grand Slams in 2002, 2004 and 2010 came either side of another Six Nations triumph in 2007, the same year Jauzion scored to oust the All Blacks in the World Cup quarter-final and earned a World Player of the Year nomination.Pioneering English backs coach Brian Ashton labelled Toulouse’s fluent best as “absolutely phenomenal” and “on a totally different level to what anyone else plays, even the All Blacks”. Whether at 12 or 13, Jauzion was the lynchpin to this irresistible style. Teams needed to develop innovative plans – as Wasps did by positioning back-rower Joe Worsley in the back-line from lineouts – to quell his influence.In 2006, the then France coach Bernard Laporte likened Jauzion’s importance to France to Ireland’s Brian O’Driscoll and England’s Jonny Wilkinson, while Sky analyst Stuart Barnes is another who didn’t need any convincing of the centre’s supreme talents. “The Jauzion offload looks easy,” he said, “but only those verging on greatness make sport seem so simple.” Yannick Jauzion scores against New Zealand in the 2007 World Cup last_img read more

2020 Rugby Preview and Predictions

first_img 2020 Rugby Preview and PredictionsRugby union fans are set for an exciting time of things in 2020, with plenty to look forward to in both domestic and international competitions.Saracens’ 35-point deduction has added an intriguing dimension to the Premiership season, setting up the possibility of one of the greatest sporting comebacks of all-time.On the international front, England will be eager to put their World Cup disappointment behind them when they kick-off their Six Nations campaign in February.Read on as we look at some of the main talking points for the next 12 months in the world of rugby union.Saracens on a missionThe massive points deduction handed down to Saracens would probably have floored other clubs, but it appears to have galvanised the reigning Gallagher Premiership champions.They have managed to claw back more than half of the deficit after just five matches, sparking a flurry of interest on the 888sport betting app in their odds to secure a top four finish.Saracens appear to have sacrificed Champions Cup success in favour of retaining their Premiership status and it is a decision that could pay huge dividends in 2020.If they can maintain their early season form throughout the campaign, Saracens should comfortably avoid relegation and climb up the table.Finishing in the top four would undoubtedly be one of the greatest sporting comebacks in history, although sneaking into a Champions Cup qualification spot is the more likely outcome.Bounce back: Maro Itoje of Saracens takes contact (Getty Images)England aiming to bounce backHaving defeated New Zealand in the semi-finals, England were strongly fancied to go on and win the 2019 World Cup.However, they were deservedly beaten by South Africa and must now quickly regroup with the Six Nations Championship looming large.England have plenty of young talent in their squad, giving head coach Eddie Jones plenty to work on over the coming months.With both Wales and Ireland set to visit Twickenham during the 2020 campaign, England’s fixtures are favourable and they are strongly fancied to complete the Grand Slam.The long-term aim for this group of players will be the 2023 World Cup in France and winning the Six Nations would be a great way to start the next cycle.Farrell faces testing times with IrelandIreland’s dismal World Cup campaign will undoubtedly have signalled the end for many of their more experienced players. This is an advertsing feature with 888 sport betting. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Shout out: Manu Tuilagi of England celebrates with his team-mates (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img It’s a 2020 vision of the rugby year ahead. This is an advertsing feature. The tournament came a year too late for Ireland and new head coach Andy Farrell has a big rebuilding job on his hands.The likes of Conor Murray, Rob Kearney, Cian Healy and others may not be around for the next World Cup, highlighting the size of the task faced by Farrell.When you factor in that this is Farrell’s first stint as a head coach, there could be some tough times ahead for Irish rugby.However, Ireland de have some promising talent coming through and if Farrell can get them to fulfil their potential the future could be bright.New boss: Wayne Pivac is now head coach of Wales(Getty Images)Pivac with big shoes to fill in WalesWarren Gatland has left Wales in a healthy state, with the squad featuring a nice blend of youth and experience.His replacement as head coach, Wayne Pivac, did a superb job with Welsh club Scarlets and he will be eager to continue in the same vein at international level.Pivac’s main issue will be imposing his own style on set-up that has been moulded around Gatland’s methodologies.Away trips to Ireland and England in the Six Nations will be tough, although Wales should be capable of picking up a positive result in Dublin.Gatland has provided Pivac with an excellent foundation to work from and it will be interesting to see how he fares in 2020.Scotland set to struggle againScotland have been having a tough time of things over the past few years and it’s difficult to see that changing anytime soon.Injuries hit them hard in last year’s Six Nations and that continued into a disappointing World Cup campaign in Japan.The gap between Scotland and the rest of the big nations has been steadily growing and it is difficult to believe they will be able to halt their slide in 2020.Head coach Gregor Townsend deserves credit for trying to play the game the right way, but Scotland simply don’t have the resources to compete on an equal footing.Italy’s presence in the Six Nations will keep them off bottom of the standings, but that will be of little consolation to Scotland’s long-suffering fans.last_img read more

Six Nations Italy v France Preview

first_imgReplacements: 16 Pierre Bourgarit, 17 Francois Gros, 18 Dorian Aldegheri, 19 Romain Taofifenua, 20 Anthony Jelonch, 21 Baptiste Serin, 22 Louis Carbonel, 23 Damian Penaud.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Shall we dance? Hookers Julien Marchand and Luca Bigi clash in last year’s Six Nations encounter (Inpho) Able understudy: centre Arthur Vincent in action last month for Montpellier against Lyon (AFP/Getty)What have the teams said?Italy head coach Franco Smith: “There’s a big expectation around winning the first game but we don’t want to win just one – we want to win consistently.“We want to be sustainable and significant in our approach. We don’t want to have a one-off where we play well. This is a new start for Italian rugby.”Virtually speaking: the national captains at last week’s Six Nations championship media launch (Inpho)Italy captain Luca Bigi: “It’s important to share the responsibility in the group, and then we build together. It’s important to go step by step every game and learn from our errors.”France captain Charles Ollivon: “We need to reach for excellence, particularly in a tournament such as the Six Nations.“So it’s up to us to keep this going and to keep asking for more work and more improvement. It’s absolutely necessary for the level we are playing at, particularly because we are representing our country and our supporters.”Any interesting statistics?France have won the previous ten meetings, the latest a 36-5 Autumn Nations Cup success in Paris last NovemberItaly’s last victory in the fixture was in 2013 in Rome (23-18), one of just two wins by them over France in 21 Six Nations meetingsAntoine Dupont made the most offloads in last year’s tournament, with 12. No one matched France’s team total of 55 offloadsFrance crossed the gain-line with 59% of their carries in the 2020 Six Nations – the best rate of any team. Italy had the worst success rate (39%)It was the same story in the scrum, France (100% success rate) and Italy (77%) at opposite ends of the spectrumThe Azzurri are hoping to end a 27-match losing run in the championship – the worst sequence in historyNone of the Italy squad players have yet to celebrate their 30th birthday. Hooker Luca Bigi and scrum-half Guglielmo Palazzani will be 30 in AprilFrance scored six tries from kick returns in last year’s tournament – the most of any nation. Italy were the only side not to score from a kick returnAll but two of the clubs playing in the top leagues of the competing nations are represented in the Six Nations squads. The clubs to miss out are Agen and BayonneCharles Ollivon was top try-scorer in the 2020 Six Nations (four). He also won the most lineouts (25), made the joint most try assists (four) and the fourth most tackles (77)Staying on tackles, French forwards Bernard Le Roux (84) and Grégory Alldritt (81) ranked first and second last yearThe absent Jake Polledri has beaten 98 defenders for Italy since his debut in 2018 – more than twice as many as any other ItalianItaly made 51 handling errors in last year’s championship, fewer than any other sideFormidable: Charles Ollivon had an outstanding 2020 championship, his first as captain (Getty Images)What time does it kick off and is it on TV?Italy v France, Saturday 6 February, Stadio OlimpicoThe match kicks off at 2.15pm in Rome and will be broadcast live on ITV. There will be live text commentary on the BBC Sport website and app.It’s largely an English officiating team for this Six Nations opener, with Matt Carley the referee, Christophe Ridley an assistant and Karl Dickson the Television Match Official. Scotsman Mike Adamson is the other assistant referee. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “Here’s the skipper, CAPTAIN FANTASTIC!” #OnThisDay #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/rGGbNmucW2— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 3, 2021What’s the big team news?Italy’s big call is to drop Canna, a second playmaker at 12, and give a debut there to centre Juan Ignacio Brex. Brex, 27, is a former Argentina XV and sevens player who left South America in 2015 and has been going well for Benetton.With Jake Polledri, arguably Italy’s best player, sadly absent after sustaining a knee injury last autumn, 22-year-old Michele Lamaro makes his first start in the back row after a couple of caps in the Autumn Nations Cup.Second-row David Sisi makes his first start since the 2019 World Cup while Jacopo Truller wears the 15 shirt occupied by Matteo Minozzi in Italy’s previous Six Nations game against England in October. Minozzi, of Wasps, is unavailable after saying he was too physically and mentally tired to live in a bubble for another two months.Test debut: Benetton’s Juan Ignacio Brex makes a tackle v Ospreys (Inpho)France’s side looks none too shabby despite their injuries. Jalibert, who started three games in the autumn, replaces the injured Ntamack (broken jaw) while Arthur Vincent fills in for Vakatawa (knee ligaments) in midfield.No 8 Grégory Alldritt, France’s top ball-carrier last year and shortlisted for 2020 Player of the Championship, lines up having joined the squad late due to an arthroscopy. And Brice Dulin and Gabin Villière are rewarded for their autumn performances with starts in the back three.Racing 92 hooker Camille Chat (calf) is missing, so Pierre Bourgarit – a starter at Twickenham in December – makes the match 23. Also on the bench is Baptiste Serin, who captained France in their Autumn Nations Cup game against Italy.center_img Matthew Carley will have the honour of kicking off the 2021 #GuinnessSixNations as he takes charge of @FedeRugby against @FranceRugby on Saturday Check out the full list of Round 1 match officials — Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 3, 2021What are the line-ups?ITALYJacopo Trulla: Luca Sperandio, Marco Zanon, Ignacio Brex, Montanna Ioane; Paolo Garbisi, Stephen Varney; Cherif Traorè, Luca Bigi (capt), Marco Riccioni, Marco Lazzaroni, David Sisi, Sebastian Negri, Johan Meyer, Michele Lamaro.Replacements: 16 Gianmarco Lucchesi, 17 Danilo Fischetti, 18 Giosué Zilocchi, 19 Niccolò Cannone, 20 Federico Ruzza, 21 Maxime Mbandà, 22 Guglielmo Palazzani, 23 Carlo Canna.FRANCEBrice Dulin; Teddy Thomas, Arthur Vincent, Gaël Fickou, Gabin Villière; Matthieu Jalibert, Antoine Dupont; Cyril Baille, Julien Marchand, Mohamed Haouas, Bernard Le Roux, Paul Willemse, Dylan Cretin, Charles Ollivon (capt), Gregory Alldritt. Six Nations Italy v France PreviewSix years ago this month, Italy beat Scotland away in round three of the Six Nations. In their next game they got clobbered 29-0 at home by France in what we know now to be the start of the worst run in the championship’s history.The Azzurri’s losing streak stands at 27 matches going into this Saturday’s 2021 Six Nations opener against the French in Rome (2.15pm). During that time, only twice have they lost by fewer than ten points – against France (23-21) in 2016 and Scotland (29-27) in 2018. The last time they picked up even a losing bonus point was nearly three years ago.These are the grisly facts and the reason why talk of promotion and relegation quickly surfaces on chatrooms at this time of year. What are Italy to do?Well, coach Franco Smith is taking the long-term view, his youthful 32-man squad containing only four players with more than 30 caps. He has entrusted the crucial No 10 role to Paolo Garbisi, a 20-year-old greenhorn who has impressed in a struggling team.Bedding in: stand-off Paolo Garbisi is the face of the new youthful Italy team (Sportsfile/Getty Images)Whether Smith, an affable South African, will be around to see the fruits of his forward-looking policy remains to be seen. They have the benefit of three home games this year but nobody outside the camp is expecting anything other than five more Italian defeats.Until recently, France would have been viewed as ideal opponents for them, such is their unpredictability. But 2020 seemingly changed all that. Les Bleus lost out to England in last year’s fractured Six Nations only on points difference. And their understrength side also took England to the wire in the Autumn Nations Cup, losing the final in extra time.Related content: French government approves Covid planIn 24-year-old Toulouse scrum-half Antoine Dupont, last year’s Player of the Championship with 46% of the vote, they have a global star.Despite an escalating injury list that includes his half-back partner Romain Ntamack and centre Virimi Vakatawa, France go into the tournament as favourites in many people’s eyes. Matthieu Jalibert, Ntamack’s replacement, has been playing out of his skin in the Top 14.Attacking mindset: Paul Willemse offloads to Antoine Dupont during last year’s Six Nations win over Italy“We’re not underdogs any more. We’re going to go everywhere as serious challengers,” former France hooker Benjamin Kayser told Scrum V. “And that’s a completely different ball game. Every single game has to be a moment to shine, to learn, to perform.”The countries met twice last year. Italy produced their best performance of the 2020 Six Nations in Paris, scoring three tries in a 35-22 defeat.They returned to the French capital in November for an Autumn Nations Cup pool game and were trounced 36-5, despite leading through Carlo Canna’s try. Here’s an Italian try to savour from a past Italy-France match, scored by their greatest-ever player, Sergio Parisse… There’s a continental clash to kick off the 2021 Six Nations. Italy will hope to spring a surprise against a French team tipped by many to land their first title since 2010last_img read more

Bishop Stacy Sauls’ opening remarks to Executive Council

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Posted Jan 27, 2012 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Stacy Sauls’ opening remarks to Executive Council New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Executive Council January 2012 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Executive Council, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Opening Remarks of the Chief Operating OfficerExecutive CouncilJanuary 27, 2012I want to begin and end by updating you on the well-being of the staff of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.  To do that, I need to tell you just a little bit about a movie, which has recently been nominated for Best Picture of the Year.  It is called “Moneyball.”  I think it would do every leader a world of good to study it carefully.  “Moneyball” is about how Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland A’s, changed the way the game of baseball is played despite an awful lot of voices that said you can’t change the way we’ve done it for a hundred years.  It is similar to the seven last words of the church:  “We’ve never done it that way before.”  The challenge Billy Beane faced is that the Oakland A’s are a small media market team, which meant that he had a small budget to work with, and that ought to suggest right off the bat that this story has some relevance to the church.  Beane’s challenge was that he couldn’t compete for the star players with the big money teams like the Yankees and the Red Sox with his small budget.  As he puts it, “There’s the rich teams, there’s the poor teams, then there’s 50 tons of crap, then there’s us.”  So, rather than trying to play the game the way the Yankees and Red Sox did, which doomed him to perpetual failure, he decides instead to play the game differently.  His guiding principle is this:  “Adapt or die.”Adapt or die.  That pretty much sums up the challenge of the Episcopal Church, and all churches, at the beginning of a post-modern, and certainly post-Christian era face.  And that is why “adapt or die” and the movie “Moneyball” became the focus of two days of in house staff meetings in January.  What emerged is this guiding principle for the life of the staff:  Dream, create, adapt, act.  Dream, create, adapt, act.That is what we have set out to do as a staff.  There are a lot of times when that is going to be difficult to do.  This weekend is one of them.  But what I as the Chief Operating Officer am absolutely committed to doing is keeping us focused on that principle no matter what comes.  Dream, create, adapt, act.So let me tell you what I dream about for our staff.  I dream about a Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society staff that is true to its name.  And I dream about a Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society staff that is known throughout the Church as creative, competent, and helpful, a staff all levels of our church want to be their resource, partners, and collaborator in engaging God’s mission to proclaim good news to the poor, release to the captives, recovery of sight to the blind, freedom to the oppressed, and the acceptable year of the Lord (Lk. 4:18).  The staff is energized and excited by that, I believe, and is beginning to see itself as a positive force for servant leadership in the church and not, at least not all of the time, as unappreciated,  marginalized and forced to be passive.  They have asked to continue the process we began at our in house event two weeks ago, and we plan to do that.  And we plan to actively continue dreaming, creating, adapting, and acting.Let me tell you how.  For one thing, we as a staff seek increased interaction and engagement with Executive Council.  Three Executive Council members, Frederica Thompsett, Stephanie Cheney, and Bruce Garner, participated in the in house process I described.  Earlier this week two staff members and I participated in a conference call with two Council members on a program idea called “Building the Beloved Community”  to address multicultural and diversity concerns.  Last month we hired an Interim Legal Counsel, Paul Nix, who is here and whom I hope you will meet.  Not only the Presiding Bishop and I were involved in that, but we involved Bonnie, Sally Johnson, David Beers, and Gay Jennings.  To be the competent and respected leadership in the church that it can be, the staff needs the collaboration of the Executive Council.  And, quite frankly, it needs the support of the Executive Council.  It wants to work with you.  And it will be responsive to you, your ideas, and your concerns.  What I ask all of you, though, is that you treat the staff as your collaborators and partners, and work directly with us, at least first, and not take what’s on your mind instead to public forums and express your criticisms there, which unfortunately is not an isolated occurrence.  When that happens it very much goes against the creativity of which we’re capable and which is precisely what the church needs from us.  And I want to suggest that it is not a good way to carry out the fiduciary responsibilities of being a board, including those owed to the staff.As we move toward building the reputation for competence, indeed excellence, that I dream about, I can tell you some initial signs of success.  First, regarding Mission Funding, I ask you for a resolution to change the name “Mission Funding,” which conjures up anything but excellence and success, to something else, perhaps Churchwide Development Office, and let us start fresh.  It is important because it is an area where I believe we can start to show success.  In that area we have prepared a report on a case for a churchwide development effort, which has been presented to Council, as requested.  We are now deeply engaged in moving the archives project forward, and I believe we have the confidence of the Board of Archives.  We are actively working on a gift in the seven figure range to benefit a diocese in Province IX.  We are actively working on a gift that could benefit Indigenous Ministries.  We will convene an advisory committee in March.  The office has prepared a case statement to lead to the sustainability of the unique strengths of our historically black Episcopal colleges.  The office is prepared to work on the work of Haiti after the Church Foundation passes off that work later this year. There is a lot of potential here, and we are beginning, finally, to see some things pay off.Also, I promised to you at our last meeting that we would have a new website before this meeting.  It demonstrates both the excellence and the potential of our Communications Department, and we have them to thank for a highly creative and welcoming new site.  There are improvements to be made, to be sure  and the next phases are already underway, but it really is an extraordinary product.The IT Department is in the process of completing a complete upgrade of all computers and a virtual desktop platform that will make networking and collaborating, and all our work, much, much easier and efficient.  By the time we meet again we will have done something about the telephone answering system.  I am tired of calling in and not being able to reach anyone. We have just sent two staff members to explore partnerships in, of all places, Kenya, where they found people on the ground extremely anxious to work with us and, among other things, the existence of the Katharine Jefferts Schori Women’s Center for Ministry in one rural diocese, something neither she nor any of us had any idea existed.  Ask Sam to describe this trip for you.I have two final things.  As I began with a report about the well-being of the staff, I want to close with one as well.  This meeting, as you might imagine, is the source of no small amount of anxiety for the staff as we consider the budget.  I have informed them of the status of the budget process in a memo yesterday.  I will share the budget drafts with them during the course of this meeting and its outcomes at the end of the meeting.  I will do the same at the conclusion of the PB&F meeting next week, and Bishop Katharine and I will meet with the staff the week after that in person.  Managers and team leaders are engaged in conversations about how to take whatever budget comes from General Convention and dream, create, adapt, and act.  But I do ask you to be sensitive to their legitimate needs in this time.And lastly, I mention my work in advocating for a serious discussion of far-reaching structural reform leaving nothing off the table and no question unasked.  That work included, as you know, a presentation to the House of Bishops in September.  There was some concern expressed at the time that the Council was not made aware of that presentation in advance.  I did not give the presentation to Council in October because it was not on the agenda, and so some members of Council asked the Executive Committee to place it on the agenda for this meeting.  The Executive Committee, however, did not think that was a good idea.  I don’t know if any of you have interest in that presentation in seeing it or not, but I gave it to the staff at our in house meeting two weeks ago and I made copies of it.  I have DVDs of the presentation with an introduction by Bishop Katharine and they are available to any of you who would like to have them.Thank you.The Rt. Rev. Stacy F. SaulsChief Operating Officer Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

The prayer trees

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Lori EricksonPosted Apr 12, 2012 Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Episcopal News Service] If you walk by my church on a warm spring day, at first glance you might think we’ve been targeted by pranksters: outside our front door, several of the trees bear a rainbow of ribbons, brightly colored strips of cloth that flutter in each passing breeze.The ribbons aren’t the result of hijinks, for we have actually invited their presence by setting up a small kiosk near the trees that contains a blank notebook and a bag full of fabric ribbons. “Offer your healing prayers here,” says a sign, while inside the kiosk is another note that explains that people around the world have long put ribbons on trees as symbol of their prayers.When we set up the kiosk we weren’t sure how this addition to our church lawn would be received. Located as we are in the middle of a busy university town, we worried that it might be a target for vandalism or that no one would take advantage of its invitation to pray. Nearly a year later, our trees are adorned with hundreds of ribbons, bearing colorful testimony to those who have stopped for a few moments in front of our church to offer prayers.Many people have also left petitions in the blank book, prayers that are given voice each Tuesday morning during our weekly healing service. “I pray that I may be strong enough to do what must be done,” says one. “I pray that the Holy Spirit will allow my grandmother to forgive those who have hurt her,” says another. “We pray that our downstairs neighbor will be OK,” offers another.The brief prayers make me wonder about the lives behind them. What has happened to the grandmother who can’t forgive? Why does that downstairs neighbor need prayers? I’ll never know, but that mystery is part of the beauty of the ribbons.A prayer tree at Trinity Episcopal Church in Iowa City, Iowa. Photo/Lori EricksonI also appreciate how the prayer trees are a form of quiet outreach and support to those who walk by our door. “I tied a ribbon on one of your trees for my sister who has cancer,” a friend told me the other day, someone whom I know does not have a faith community. “It makes me feel better to see it as I walk by each day.”One of my favorite prayers left at the kiosk is this one: “I give a prayer of thanksgiving for this church for providing this awesome opportunity to pray as a community.” Given the fact that the person signed this message with an extravagantly large heart, she was probably young enough to consider “awesome” as a synonym for “great.” I like to think our prayer trees are awesome in the original meaning of the word as well.As Episcopalians we rightly value the historic liturgies of our church, crafting our services with beautiful words and music. I greatly appreciate those efforts, but I often find myself pausing outside our church on Sunday mornings to look at the ribbons dancing in the breeze. I think that perhaps as beautiful as the service has been, it is these prayers that go most swiftly to God’s ear, for in matters of the heart, simplicity is better than complexity.I’m reminded too of a line from Lauren Winner’s powerful new memoir, “Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis.” As Winner struggles with trying to keep her spiritual life alive through a time of doubt and trial, she takes comfort from a poem written by Carrie Fountain. Prayer, the poet writes, “was the last skill I learned. I practiced rigorously. Just as I was getting good, I lost it. As soon as it was gone, I understood it was not a skill at all.”That’s why I think those ribbons have something to teach us about how to pray. Our words don’t have to be elaborate or skillfully crafted. They don’t have to be spoken inside a church or led by a member of the clergy. However they’re formed, the spirit will take the words where they need to go, borne on the wings of each passing spring breeze.— Lori Erickson writes about inner and outer journeys at www.spiritualtravels.info. She serves as a deacon at Trinity Episcopal Church in Iowa City, Iowa. The Rev. Judith Jones, Vicar says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Catherine weir says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs April 12, 2012 at 8:32 pm So glad you posted a picture too, how wonderful….. Catherine weir says: The prayer trees Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service February 20, 2016 at 4:17 am It’s is with regret that I have to inform my friends that my loving husband Alex passed away on 18th February after a long battle with cancer. Please pray for his son and all his friends and relations. Thank you November 23, 2012 at 4:14 pm When I sew quilt tops and trim my fabric, I take the ribbon like pieces and put them in my magnolia tree. Recently my friend, Joe spent 11 weeks in the hospital with his second round of leukemia. Every day I would go out and touch each piece and say a prayer. He’s home now and gaining weight.I love my prayer tree. I would love to forward a picture. April 13, 2012 at 12:19 am Beautiful thought,Beautiful action carried through,Beautiful ribbons floating prayers above.Beautiful words,Beautiful woman who wrote them. Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Phyllis Clark says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 17, 2016 at 7:19 pm Could you please pray for my husband he has just gone into Roxbury house in Dundee. He has lung cancer Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Carolyn Beranek says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID April 15, 2012 at 2:25 am What a beautiful visible sign of his Love & Prayers in action…Let His Spirit Rise & Shine! O Yeh! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Lin Newman says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (6) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

New Zealand: Interim cathedral for Christchurch gets go-ahead

first_img Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Zealand: Interim cathedral for Christchurch gets go-ahead Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC By Taonga staffPosted Apr 16, 2012 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Taonga] A Transitional Cathedral for Christchurch, New Zealand – designed by Japanese architect Shigeru Ban – will be built in Latimer Square on the site of St John’s Church.An architect’s impression of what Christchurch’s Transitional Christchurch will look like. Photo/Anglican TaongaThe NZ$4.5 million (US$3.68 million) cardboard structure, to be completed by Christmas, will be used for worship and community events until a new permanent cathedral is built. It will then become the worship center for St John’s Parish.This “symbol of hope” was announced by Richard Gray, representing the Transitional Cathedral Group, and Christchurch Bishop Victoria Matthews.With 400 parishioners, St John’s is one of the larger parishes in the diocese and now worships at Mairehau High School and St Saviour’s, Sydenham.The old stone church, vicarage and hall on the corner of Hereford and Madras streets had to be demolished after the Feb. 22, 2011 earthquake. It was announced in early March that the quake-crippled ChristChurch Cathedral will be brought down to a “safe level” – between 2 and 3 meters high.In a media briefing at the Latimer Square site, Gray said: “This is a very exciting next step for the project. The Transitional Cathedral is a symbol of hope for the future of this city as well as being sustainable and affordable.“The cathedral is confident it will attract interest nationally and internationally drawing additional visitors to the city.”Matthews said: “I am delighted we have reached this step and I acknowledge the wonderful collaboration between the congregations of the cathedral and St John’s that has made a Transitional Cathedral possible in the inner city.”With seating for 700, the building also will provide a venue for concerts, exhibitions, civic and community events.Linked containers will sit alongside the Cathedral and include a café and shop, meeting rooms, amenities and offices.“The bulk of the money is in hand but there will be further fundraising to meet the costs of building the temporary structure,” Gray said.He acknowledged a number of sponsors, including Warren and Mahoney, Holmes Consulting, Beca, The George Hotel, Sonoco (cardboard tube manufacturer) and Air New Zealand.A NZ$50,000 (US$40,917) feasibility study was paid for by the Christchurch Earthquake Appeal Trust.The Transitional Cathedral will be made of cardboard tubes, timber beams, structural steel and a concrete pad, and is intended to last well over 20 years.It is the largest “emergency structure” designed by Shigeru Ban.He and associate architect Yoshie Narimatsu are not charging for their services.Warren and Mahoney will soon begin work on detailed drawings, and the building should be completed by this December. There are hopes that the opening could coincide with a visit of outgoing Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams.Shigeru Ban hopes to be in Christchurch this weekend for the first turning of the soil on the site. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Resoluciones sobre Cuba reciben apoyo en la Convención General

first_img Submit a Press Release Por Araceli MaPosted Jul 9, 2012 Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (1) General Convention, Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Resoluciones sobre Cuba reciben apoyo en la Convención General Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL The Ven. Cn. Juan A Quevedo-Bosch says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS General Convention 2012 Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Griselda Delgado, Obispa de Cuba, hablando en el evento “Nuestra Iglesia hoy en Haiti y Cuba.” Photo/Araceli Ma[Episcopal News Service – Indianápolis] ¿Cómo trabajas con una sociedad a la que no le han enseñado religión en los colegios, en que en las familias no ‘tienen’ que bautizar y en la que los niños en la escuela a veces les han dicho en forma despectiva ‘él es cristiano.’? Son las preguntas que la Obispa de Cuba: Griselda Delgado, se hacía mientras estudiaba en el Seminario Teológico de Cuba en la década de los ochenta.Cuba es un país singular por su realidad política, económica y social. También en Cuba hay una diócesis Episcopal extra-provincial establecida desde el siglo XIX llena de esperanza, acción y servicio. Cuenta con 44 congregaciones, 36 misiones, 21 sacerdotes y 4 sacerdotes mujeres, 6 seminaristas.La Obispa Griselda Delgado asiste a la 77ª Convención General en calidad de Obispa visitante. Este jueves habló ante el Comité de Asuntos Nacionales e Internacionales, quienes consideran dos resoluciones concernientes a Cuba. Una resolución propone que la Iglesia Episcopal apoye el fin del embargo a Cuba y otra que aboga por un trato humanitario a prisioneros cubanos. Ambas resoluciones fueron presentadas por la comisión Permanente de Asuntos Anglicanos y de Paz Internacional con Justicia.La obispa Griselda Delgado abogó por el fin del embargo aduciendo que afecta a la población mas pobre de cuba. ‘Nuestros niños no pueden acceder a medicinas contra el cáncer o nuestros hospitales a equipos médicos modernos. El embargo afecta también el acceso a internet el cual es muy escaso o nulo. Así mismo cuatro sacerdotes episcopales jubilados no pueden recibir su pensión como merecían y uno de ellos ya murió.’La primada de Cuba también habló en favor de una resolución pidiendo trato humanitario para los prisioneros cubanos y especialmente que se les permita las visitas de sus familiares, que en algunos casos no han visto desde hace 10 años. También mencionó el caso de Rene González-un agente cubano acusado de espionaje- quien goza de libertad condicional en Miami, pero a quien la justicia estadounidense no le permite regresar aun a Cuba. Se escucharon otras cinco opiniones a favor y solo una en contra de estas resoluciones. La Comisión decidió cerrar brevemente la sesión, rompiendo el protocolo, para saludar efusivamente a la Obispa Griselda.Este viernes la Obispa fue invitada a dar una conferencia en el evento ‘Nuestra iglesia hoy en Haití y Cuba’, organizada por la Oficina de Desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal, reunión que contó con la presencia de la Obispa Presidenta KatharineJefferts Schori y unos setenta invitados entre Obispos, sacerdotes y laicos, primero se vieron las fotos de las obras de reconstrucción en Haití y se escuchó al Obispo Sufragante Oge Beauvoir agradeciendo la labor de reconstrucción que la Iglesia Episcopal realiza en Haití.Luego la Obispa Griselda, dio su discurso en español (traducido simultáneamente al inglés) y fue acompañado de las fotos del trabajo de la Iglesia Episcopal en la Isla. Empezó con una reseña histórica y agradeció el apoyo recibido por la Iglesia Episcopal Nacional y a la diócesis de Canadá quienes hacen posible que la diócesis de Cuba mantenga su trabajo pastoral y social.Volviendo a la pregunta inicial ¿Como se trabaja en Cuba? Ella responde desde su experiencia en la Iglesia Episcopal que la gente encuentra una dimensión espiritual que balancea sus vidas y les da fortaleza. ‘La sociedad cubana no va los domingos a misa solo porque es una tradición familiar, ellos nos se bautizan porque ‘deben hacerlo’. Además agrega ‘Durante la década del 90 Cuba dejó de recibir ayuda de la Unión soviética y de los países del campo socialista, eso agregado el embargo de Estados Unidos, resultó en una grave crisis económica, en la que no había comida en la mesa de los cubanos, la Iglesia dio una respuesta local en dos dimensiones: dio desayuno a los pobres sí, pero además dio apoyo espiritual, porque muchas personas aprendieron que tener una conexión con un ser supremo les daba fortaleza para la vida diaria.’A la pregunta de ¿Cómo hizo crecer sus congregaciones? Ella responde: ‘No hay receta, solo persistencia y testimonio en tu vida diaria, la crisis del 90 sirvió para revitalizar todas las iglesias aumentaron los bautizos, confirmaciones y vocaciones. Yo creo que hemos tenido un crecimiento prudente pero sólido.’Acerca de las relaciones ecuménicas en Cuba, ella recuerda con alegría la década del 80 mientras estudiaba en el Seminario ecuménico entonces tenía amigos de diversas denominaciones. Luego las actividades ecuménicas fueron disminuyendo. Pero reconoce que El Consejo Ecuménico de las Iglesias en Cuba tiene un exitoso programa de capacitación en programas de desarrollo sostenible, porque tienen la visión de que los feligreses encuentren sus talentos y los pongan al servicio de los demás.Si pudiera resumir la visión de su diócesis en un lema ¿cuál seria? ‘Un pequeño grupo de personas en pequeños lugares haciendo pequeñas cosas pueden transformar la faz de la tierra.’ Sonríe y sale corriendo hacia la sesión de la Casa de los Obispos: la mujer de cultura Aymara, boliviana de nacimiento, con un corazón inmenso para los cubanos y primera Obispa mujer de Cuba.— Araceli Ma es integrante del equipo del Episcopal News Service en la Convención General. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 11, 2012 at 3:49 pm Gracias por la informacion, creo necesario hacer una correccion, Griselda es la Obispa Diocesana. Desde 1967 Cuba es extra-provincial y bajo el cuidado para cuestiones de Fe y Orden de un Consejo Metropolitano compuestos por los primados de la Iglesia Episcopal, la Indias Occientales y Canada que tradicionalmente ha sido el presidente. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Engaging doubt with youth

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 By Brenda Lane RichardsonPosted Apr 15, 2013 Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Engaging doubt with youth Seminary looks at opportunities in challenging youth ministry Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Many people who work with youth and young adults say that engaging young people in conversations about their doubts is a proven route for teaching the critical thinking skills essential for adult faith. Photo/CDSP[Church Divinity School of the Pacific] With the economy remaining fragile and church budgets strained, it can be difficult to make a case for investing in youth ministry. Sound investing is supposed to be geared toward the future, and many believe that youth are the future of the church.But some church leaders looking at the cost side of the ledger only see diminishing returns. It is not simply that there appear to be fewer adolescents and teens in churches.Evidence-based studies suggest that investing resources into cultivating faith in young people is not paying off. By 2010, Ranier Research was reporting that 70 percent of youth leave church by the time they’re 22. The next year, the Barna Group estimated that 80 percent of young people raised in the church would be “disengaged” by age 29.There are sociological explanations for why young people aren’t lining up in adulthood to participate in organized religion. These days, the church has to compete for attention against the lure of social media and the busy schedules of the college-bound.What’s most worrisome, though, is how the politicization of religion has caused many youth to regard faith with suspicion. Perhaps as a result, according to a 2012 Pew Research Center report, a greater number of young people are expressing doubts about the existence of God than at any time since the organization began taking surveys on the subject more than a decade ago. Thirty-one percent disagreed with the statement “I never doubt the existence of God,” twice the number that disagreed in 2007.Responding to discouraging reports, some church leaders recommend paring down youth investments. Other church leaders think like contrarian investor Warren Buffet. He puts his money into stocks that may be undervalued by a majority of investors.It might be said that speaker Andrew Zirschky has contrarian views about youth investment. The academic director of the Center for Youth Ministry Training in Brentwood, Tennessee, he holds a master of divinity degree from Princeton Theological Seminary and has worked as a youth and college minister at churches in Idaho, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.Like others in his field, Zirschky doesn’t focus on youth as the future of the church but as the present and as well deserving of investment. Rather than responding by shutting down challenging questions, or offering verbal pats on the back, he recommends encouraging youth to express their doubts and then share them with the congregation for a robust conversation.Zirschky led an April 13 symposium at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California, that was co-sponsored by the Diocese of California and was open to church and youth leaders, parent, and seminarians. The title of his presentation was “Engaging Doubt with Youth – Growing in Faith through Questioning and Challenge.”The Very Rev. W. Mark Richardson, dean and president of CDSP, initiated the symposium because he wants the school to become a hub where youth leaders may convene regularly. CDSP’s history as a founding member of the Graduate Theological Union, a major center of interreligious studies, makes the institution unique among other Episcopal seminaries, Richardson says. “We are located in one of the greatest urban university environments in the world. Our context offers opportunities for interactions with people from many denominations and religions.“Just as importantly, our school is recognized for being strong in ministry development, which involves the education and formation of leaders who will not only serve as professional ministers in the church and the world (either lay or ordained), but also empower and enable the ministries of all baptized people in their daily life as disciples of Jesus Christ.“We also have the capacity to place seminarians interested in working with young people and wanting to know how to support discussions related to real-world experiences into churches that have dynamic youth ministry mentors.”As to CDSP’s symposium focusing on adolescent doubt, Richardson says, “The Episcopal Church is a place where serious spiritual quest makes room for doubt. Compassionate and trusting relationships are key for those asking big questions. Doubt is an aspect of our lives, no matter our age.”He recalled a story from the Rev. Mary Hudak, associate rector of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in nearby Orinda and recently called to be rector of St. Michael’s in Carmichael, California. When one of Mary’s sons was 4, she said that he woke up saying, “Mom, I’m so worried! I don’t believe enough.” She explained that if he was losing sleep over this, he believed enough.“Young people didn’t invent doubt,” Richardson says, “but we know that as they reach adolescence they’re more highly motivated than others to look for ways to be in trusting communities where people can explore their faith in spite of their doubt.”Youth leader reflect on how adults reacted to their doubts as adolescentsEngaging young people in conversations about their doubts is a proven route for teaching the critical thinking skills essential for adult faith. And yet a number of youth leaders recalled experiences that left them feeling alienated and unable to share their most challenging thoughts.Kellor Smith with her daughter Abby. Photo/CDSPAs a teen in Oakland, Kellor Smith says she didn’t doubt her faith as much as she did the leaders of the church she was attending. “They were always talking to us about sin. I hated listening to that.”Finally, she came up with an idea about starting a youth group. “I was excited about going to the pastor with this idea, until a church official explained that I couldn’t present my idea to him because I was a woman.”Eager to get along with others in the community, Smith tolerated the indignity.“Eventually, I began telling adults of my interest in pursuing a career in communication. They were eager to help, but they only referred me to people within their Christian networks. This kind of narrow-mindedness eventually drove me off.”Smith remained wary of the church. By the 1970s, she learned of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Oakland from her mother, Nancy Baker, who was attending a morning service there. Smith would ride along with her, so she would later be dropped off at Skyline High. Later, when attending Mills College, Smith dropped by St. John’s to say hello and agreed to join the choir. “This became my social community,” she says.The comfort she felt talking with new friends about real-world experiences and decision-making as a person of faith led her to join the parish. She later became its youth director.CDSP honored Smith for her ministry at a reception after the April 13 symposium and has created and is raising money for a scholarship for youth ministry in her name.Religious doubt during adolescence caused hardship for Daniel London. He is now a doctoral student at the Graduate Theological Union and the leader of the Marin Episcopal Youth Group, a collaborative representing five churches: Church of the Nativity (San Rafael), Christ Church (Sausalito), Church of the Redeemer (San Rafael), St. Paul’s (San Rafael) and St. Francis (Novato).London and his family, regular churchgoers, relocated from California to Ithaca, New York, about the same time that he and an older brother began rebelling against religious teachings by experimenting with marijuana and committing petty crimes.The two eventually straightened up and returned to the church, practically becoming zealots. “I got really immersed into a religious subculture, and even stopped listening to music that wasn’t certified by the church,” says London.He also struggled to figure out how to start dating within church-imposed restraints. The lifestyle restrictions he learned to cope with, but restrictive thinking was something else entirely.“There were certain ways of thinking and questions that were rejected,” he says. “There was so much I could not do that life became miserable for me. I felt I was going to suffocate.”Returning to California for college, he happened upon All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena. While talking to congregants, “My understanding of Christianity got so much bigger.”Daniel London prays Compline with youth group members. Photo/CDSPToday, London is looking forward to his upcoming ordination in the Diocese of Los Angeles. While he enjoys encouraging youth group participants to share their views about faith, he avoids preaching at them by adhering to the instruction from Saint Francis to: “Preach the gospel at all times and when necessary use words.”London says he wants to teach young people how to encounter Christ in unlikely places, whether volunteering for the homeless in Marin, assisting in the Hurricane Sandy relief effort or providing stuffed animals for orphans in Vietnam.Jeffrey Dodge also looks back on a turbulent period during his adolescence when he “dared” to express doubt in church teachings. Currently a second-year CDSP seminarian discerning whether he has been called into youth ministry, he says that at the church in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, that he and his family attended, he used to pepper Sunday school teachers with questions that drew frowns. “I wondered why a loving God would condemn people to hell even if they had never heard of Christianity.”A convert to the Episcopal Church, Dodge says he is so appalled at Christianity’s tarnished image – because of polemic language from the right and the left — that he feels the need to evangelize.“When I converse with young people, I say that I’m Christian and add, ‘Before you run away, I want you to know that science informs Episcopalians about how the world works, while the Spirit informs us about how the world connects. Church is about community, not ideology. You don’t have to be a Christian to find God. And if I invite you to join the Episcopal Church, it’s an invitation, not a requirement.’”The Rev. Martin Elfert grew up distanced from the religious divide. He was raised in the resolutely secular context of Vancouver, Canada, with a family that did not attend church. It wasn’t until he and his wife, Phoebe, had the first of their three children that Elfert began to wonder if church could help him respond to God.The Rev. Martin Elfert says he is is impressed with the thoughtful questions he gets from young people because, unlike adults, they have not yet learned to self-censor. Photo/CDSP“The Celts wrote about ‘thin places.’ We may also speak of ‘thin experiences’ in which you can almost reach out and touch God’s face,” he says. “When I first became a father I had a deep understanding of the love out of which our son was born.”Elfert turned for direction from his father-in-law, an Anglican priest, and the community of Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver, which ultimately encouraged him to seek ordination. Today he participates in ministry for and with children and youth at the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in Spokane, Washington.Elfert says he is impressed with the thoughtful questions he gets from young people because, unlike adults, they have not yet learned to self-censor. Every January, he assists as a chaplain for Teens Encountering Christ, a three-day program in which 50 young people prepare worship, give homilies and share stories of faith.Elizabeth Clayton, a former youth group member who works as a wedding planner, tells of an experience that strengthened her faith. After moving to Oakland from Europe and joining the St. John’s youth group in 1999, “We took a mission trip to Idaho that was led by Kellor [Smith] and [the Rev.] Scott [Denman, rector]. We were joined by other youth groups from various denominations.”Clayton was glad that the different groups were getting along, until she learned that some of the others were outraged because St. John’s welcomes everyone, including those from the LGBT community, and invites women to serve as priests. Viewing the St. John’s group members as sinners and fearing that they would be sent to hell, the others had begun praying for their souls.Clayton was upset until Denman and Smith explained that the other groups had the right to believe as they did. “That’s when I realized that not all churches are as accepting and open as ours. I felt lucky to belong to a group that met me where I was, and that I was also being taught to be more accepting of others. The experience strengthened my faith.”For the past three years, Clayton has served on the St. John’s vestry.Why youth programs are good investmentsLike many youth leaders, Smith points out that the most practical aspect of an active youth group is its role in building congregations. St. John’s has about 600 congregants, including a revolving youth group of about 30 young adults that attracts parents, siblings and extended-family members.Acknowledging the congregational building aspect of youth groups, the Rev. Stephen McHale, associate rector of faith formation at the Episcopal Church of the Resurrection in Pleasant Hill, California, paraphrases a line from Mark Devries’ Sustainable Youth Ministry: Why Youth Ministry Doesn’t Last and What Your Church Can Do About It: “The job of the youth minister is to be the architect of a constellation of relationships in the church.”Rather than being an individual contributor working independently with young people, he says, “A youth leader actually works to empower lay leadership.”Betty Kasson of Carmel Valley agrees that youth groups are a key to vital congregations. But this trustee of All Saints Day School and member of St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church also learned from raising two sons that youth leaders play another essential role.“More than anything else, adolescents care about relationships,” she says. “When your children need to turn to someone outside the family for advice, ask yourself: Do you want them to turn solely to their peers, or should they also have someone who relates to them and shares the spiritual values of your congregation?”Denman adds that, along with not treating youth programs as an isolated category, church leaders should encourage a culture of youthful energy and playfulness among the entire congregation.“We all have that youthful energy and vision even in our later years. Some of us wear disguises, but underneath those wrinkles are playful children,” he says. “People want to be youthful and, as Jesus said, we have to become like a child to enter the kingdom.“I wonder sometimes if we too often wait for youth to arrive at a church before we start to offer youthful energy and ideas. Why don’t we just start by offering to everyone some playful, accessible, fun programs that inspire the child within, and just see what happens?”What youth leaders say about how they are perceivedElfert says he was drawn to the cathedral job in Spokane by the high value that St. John’s places on children and youth ministries. He realized that not all churches attached the same importance to youth ministry.“One of the church’s greatest sins is making youth ministry an entry-level position,” he says. “Too many consider it a job that you perform until you’re good enough to become a rector.”The Rev. Philip Brochard, rector of All Souls Parish in Berkeley, which has invested in building a community of young people, says that across the denominational spectrum youth ministry is often so devalued that it’s difficult to find people willing to make a career out of the vocation. “I think a lot of churches want to see an immediate effect, and that’s not going to happen with youth groups.”Some youth leaders confide that they are expected to create nearly miraculous results in under-funded, poorly supported positions. There is such frequent turnover in youth director positions, for which college degrees are required, that staffers often stay for one year or less, Brochard says. This phenomenon is referred to as “one and done.”Cait Black, youth minister at Trinity Episcopal Church in Menlo Park, California, was surprised to see similar scenarios occurring in the Deep South and among wealthier congregations. “The first thing to go from stressed church budgets is the full-time youth minister.”Her job at Trinity came complete with housing, but she points out that her situation is an anomaly. Grateful for Trinity’s support and enthusiasm for youth, she adds that in many high-cost-of-living areas, churches often offer part-time work without benefits.Ed Horsley, a youth worker assisting Black at Trinity while searching for a job, says he finds that many Episcopal churches work on the old assumption that, “even if the young people lose interest in church, they’ll come back, when they have families of their own.”This is a myth that too many in the Episcopal Church seem to hold onto, according to the Rev. Dr. Susanna Singer, CDSP associate professor of ministry development. She explains that, by and large, young people are not returning to the church in adulthood, with or without their children.“It’s as if the church hasn’t caught up to this reality yet,” she says. “There is no cultural pressure to go to church and certainly no denominational loyalty. And there isn’t enough investment. Christian formation these days requires something different from 50 years ago, when there was still a broader Christian culture with communities supportive of church and other religious practices.”Her point is underscored by a story the retired Diocese of California Bishop William E. Swing shares about his World War II-era youth in West Virginia. “My friends and I were playing football on a vacant lot that we didn’t know was owned by an Episcopal Church. It was raining and snowing. The priest said, ‘Come on in out of the mud, we’ve got a ping pong table.’ We went in, and a few weeks later, the priest was looking for acolytes. He said, ‘Who in here likes to wear uniforms and light candles?’ I raised my hand, and next thing I knew I was bishop of California.”The difference today, Singer says, is that for young people to become mature Christians, they need more deliberate formation from the church. She refers to theologian John Westerhoff’s theory that this cultural shift requires a move from acquired faith to owned faith.“We’ve got to be intentional about faith formation in the teen years, and that requires money and taking the problem seriously,” she says. “Doubt is what young people need to grapple with, but not in isolation. Then they can make their beliefs their own.”Read more about itWhat can cash-strapped churches do?Some examples of effective youth ministryBrenda Lane Richardson, an author and clinical social worker, uses memoir writing as a therapeutic modality. Her most recent work, “You Should Really Write a Book,” was published by St. Martin’s Press in 2012. She is married to CDSP’s dean and president, the Rev. W. Mark Richardson, PhD. This article first appeared in the Spring 2013 issue of Crossings, an alumni publication of the Church Divinity School of the Pacific. Rector Smithfield, NC John Leech says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Submit an Event Listing April 16, 2013 at 9:02 am I think this is the most important line in this article. “Like others in his field, Zirschky doesn’t focus on youth as the future of the church but as the present and as well deserving of investment.” If we are not there to connect with people where they are at a given time in their lives they are going to leave. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Youth & Young Adults Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Alda Morgan says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books April 15, 2013 at 4:55 pm AMEN! The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Very Rev. Stuart Schadt says: April 15, 2013 at 4:33 pm A lot of what is said in this article makes sense and is important. However, I think the most important thing a church (parish, diocese, up to communion) can do to attract and retain young people is to live the Gospel. Any attempt to “sell” the church deserves to fail if it isn’t based on what we actually do, and people will see that our advertising doesn’t match our reality. While specific actions can be more effective in reaching young people, if the focus is on building a membership (old or young), the Gospel can be ignored as a side issue. If, however, we have a shared purpose beyond ourselves, we will together treat each other well, will reach out to others to show love, and people of all ages will see that and be attracted to participate in sharing the goodness of the Kingdom. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem April 15, 2013 at 4:46 pm As someone long associated with the Church Divinity School (as student, staff member, faculty spouse, etc.), I’m glad that we’re lifting up ministry to and of youth and the need to serve and encourage our children and young people. The old legend which my generation thought was so sophisticated and tolerant–that eventually young people would return to the church after becoming parents–is indeed no longer true, if it ever was. And it was an excuse to do nothing and use the money “saved” for other purposes in the parish budget. So, I say “Amen!, Amen!” to this effort ot get the Episcopal Church out of its complacent rut. I’d only add that one more thing is necessary: we also need to encourage and support ministry in higher education, not only to and among the students, but also to and in that critical institution. This is an ecumenical task and one where patient, collaborative, long-term vision can enable the Church, the Body of Christ, to have an impact on our society and its values. Like ministry with young people, this ministry requires time in order to be faithful. Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (5) April 17, 2013 at 8:20 am This workshop was well worth attending. One takeaway: Seeking Understanding Together. Dan Shockley says: Freda Marie says: Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tagslast_img read more

Grupo de Trabajo sobre el Estudio del Matrimonio publica pautas…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Posted Jun 26, 2014 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Grupo de Trabajo sobre el Estudio del Matrimonio publica pautas de estudio, recursos de debate Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [24 de junio de  2014] El grupo de trabajo de la Iglesia Episcopal sobre el Estudio del Matrimonio ha publicado Querido Amado, recursos para conversación y debate.El siguiente es un informe del Grupo de Trabajo sobre el Estudio del Matrimonio.Querido Amado: Un paquete con pautas para el estudio y debate sobre el MatrimonioNos complace ofrecer a la Iglesia Episcopal  un recurso para el estudio y debate sobre el matrimonio. Ha llegado su hora. Ya que este tema es de importancia histórica y de significado intemporal para la iglesia; las prácticas de matrimonio están experimentando un cambio social en nuestros días; y nuestra iglesia, a través de la resolución A050 en la Convención General del 2012, solicitó que desarrollemos herramientas para el debate sobre este tema.Entramos en esta conversación – como siempre lo hacemos cuando discernimos el camino a seguir – al considerar esas tres fuentes de autoridad anglicana sobre el tema: la escritura, la tradición (incluyendo la teología, liturgia, derecho canónico, e historia), y la razón (incluyendo nuestra experiencia humana).Nuestro equipo de trabajo está formado por 12 personas designadas: obispos, teólogos, educadores y pastores. A medida que el grupo de trabajo se encarga de la provisión de recursos para esta reflexión, nosotros hemos explorado profundamente el matrimonio a través del lente de las Escrituras, la tradición y la razón. Hemos estudiado y hemos consultado ampliamente.Si bien no vamos a completar este trabajo hasta que hagamos nuestro informe a la Convención General del 2015, estamos en condiciones, en este momento, de compartir con la iglesia un poco de nuestros esfuerzos hasta la fecha. Y lo más importante, estamos dispuestos a invitar a la iglesia en el debate a nivel local.Nuestra esperanza es que muchos aprovechen de este momento de nuestra historia para ser parte de discernir el camino a seguir. En nuestros días, ¿qué nos llama Dios a comprender, a decir, y tal vez hacer en lo que respecta al matrimonio?Sólo podemos responder a esta pregunta si más de 12 personas participan. Obtener una amplia participación ayudará a los diputados y obispos – representantes de todos nosotros – en la Convención General del 2015, cuando ellos reciban nuestro informe y consideren las posibles respuestas al llamado de nuestra iglesia para profundizar esta conversación.El recurso puede ser utilizado en una variedad de escenarios,  y consta de tres formatos diferentes, que pueden utilizarse de forma independiente el uno del otro: un evento de 90-minutos (que se puede dividir en tres sesiones de 35-minutos); una variedad de foros de 45 minutos; y un extenso artículo de un grupo de estudio. Todos los tres formatos cubren la teología, la historia, la escritura, las tendencias actuales, y más, con las pautas para la presentación y preguntas para el debate en grupo.El paquete “Querido Amado” se encuentra aquíhttps://extranet.generalconvention.org/staff/files/download/10613El PowerPoint para el recurso de  “Continuar Conversaciones” se encuentra aquíhttps://extranet.generalconvention.org/staff/files/download/10446Obtenga acceso aquí a la página web completa para el Grupo de Trabajo sobre el matrimonio de la Convención General A050 http://www.generalconvention.org/a050 .____________________Grupo de Trabajo de la Iglesia Episcopal en el Estudio del Matrimonio está autorizado por la Resolución A050 de la Convención General del 2012.La Resolución A050 completa está disponible aquí. http://www.generalconvention.org/gc/resolutions?by=number&id=a050Página de Grupo de Trabajo en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/A050taskforceGrupo de Trabajo en YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHbLobftcghgmWgJW72qnwA/playlists Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Canadian indigenous bishop slams ‘doctrine of discovery’

first_imgCanadian indigenous bishop slams ‘doctrine of discovery’ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 19, 2017 at 11:31 am Good points, William R. Well said. I think maybe the “historical circumstances” you mention are what are spoken of in the book “Guns, Germs and Steel.’ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Indigenous Ministries Posted Aug 17, 2017 [Anglican Communion News Service] The “doctrine of discovery” – the idea that indigenous people need to be discovered and westernized – has been criticized by the national indigenous bishop of Canada. Bishop Mark MacDonald made his comments during a visit to Australia, where he attended a number of events, including a retreat for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Anglican leaders retreat in central Australia.Full article. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Joan Mistretta says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (4) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA September 4, 2017 at 7:01 pm Well said. Anglican Communion, Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 17, 2017 at 11:20 pm “Westernized” is confused with modernization. The problem is distinguishing one from the other. Modernization may or may not be a good thing; but people (including indigineous people) seem to want its benefits. The Europeans modernized first, not becaus of any inherent superiority, but because of historical circumstances. They brought it to indigineous peoples. I’m sure that Bishop MacDonald has plenty to say about the negative effects of the Europeans on the indigenous people, but I doubt that he, or they, want to stop using their cell phones. If westernization is a matter of culture, then Bishop MacDonald is engaging in one of the most westernizing endeavors among the indigenous people; proselytizing the Christian religion. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA William Russiello says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 19, 2017 at 11:35 am Well, I guess I will add to my comment, if I may. I don’t think that in this day and age proselytizing the Christian religion belongs in the rest of the group of behaviors. Today there is much more choice involved and much less power to threaten. Keith Gardner says: Joan Mistretta says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more