Inner city

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Software firm gives Hillier Parker UK role

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Third of married Kiwis have affairs – survey

first_imgNZ Herald 17 Sep 2011Nearly one in three married New Zealanders has had an affair, a new survey has found. But almost half of Kiwi couples say they would stay with a cheating partner and try to work things out. More than 500 people were questioned about their feelings on marriage and all things associated with it for a survey conducted by the New Zealand Woman’s Weekly magazine in conjunction with Colmar Brunton.People aged 18 to 64 were asked 30 questions about love, sex, affairs and even how they felt about doing the household chores. The findings showed 29 per cent of the group had had an affair, while 47 per cent said they would stick with their partner and work things out… Results also showed women under 30 were more likely to walk out of a relationship if their partner had an affair. Older people – particularly men over 50 – were more forgiving.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10752363last_img read more

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South Ripley High School News

first_imgVersailles, IN—Students from South Ripley High School report the events occuring this week at the school.  A special Zumba performance will showcase students from Mrs. Ochs’s and Mr. Griffin’s classrooms along with several Champions Together members at this Friday night’s ballgame against Milan.  Zumba instructors from the Southeastern Indiana YMCA in Batesville provide programming for students with intellectual disabilities during the school year.   Homecoming activities will take place on Saturday, February 1 between the JV and varsity basketball games against Jennings County.  The Young Confederate Show Choir will be having a Sweetheart dinner on Thursday, February 13.  The high school Polar Plunge Team will be taking the plunge for Special Olympics Indiana at the Versailles State Park on Saturday, February 15.  The plunge begins at 2 pm.last_img read more

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Referees just getting in the way of the game

first_imgOfficiating is one of those things nobody likes.Seriously.When’s the last time you came away pleased with the refereeing in a game you were watching, praising the officials for a job well done?The officiating in Saturday’s USC-Arizona men’s game wasn’t too great, and controversy ensued.In their last game of the season, the Trojans were up by three, 69-66, with seconds remaining in regulation. The Wildcats had possession. Arizona guard Kyle Fogg threw up a desperation three-pointer that didn’t go in.Game over, right? No.USC sophomore forward Nikola Vucevic was whistled for what can only be described as an unusual foul call. It sent Fogg to the line for three free throws — all of which Fogg nailed to send the game into overtime.Let’s just say USC coach Kevin O’Neill wasn’t pleased about the development. After the game, he refused to address the situation directly.“Everyone knows what happened out there,” O’Neill said in his postgame press conference, according to USCfootball.com. “It’s no secret. Everyone at the game saw what happened and I’m going to leave it at that.”Vucevic was just puzzled.“I didn’t touch anything,” he told the Los Angeles Times. “I just went up with my hand in the air so he couldn’t see the basket.”That was that, and the Trojans moved on to the overtime period with a serious chip on their shoulders.Only that wasn’t it.USC was hampered by a number of other calls over the course of the game, including an Arizona shot in the first overtime that appeared to be released after the shot clock expired, but was counted by officials.In the end the Trojans lost, 86-84, in overtime on a clean layup by Arizona point guard Nic WiseBut the story after the game was more focused on the officiating than anything else.And that right there, is when you know referees aren’t doing their job.One of the first things you learn in referee school is to not change the outcome of the game. Essentially, you are a sidenote to the happenings of the matter, not a key part of it.But, all too often, referees don’t stay true to that. Take Fogg’s shot for example. If the foul hadn’t been called, it’s not like Arizona had much to complain about.The rule of thumb is that fouls aren’t supposed to be called in a game’s waning seconds unless it is completely obvious.And that one wasn’t.Fogg himself said he wasn’t expecting the call afterward, but he gladly took what he could get and ran with it.Now, go ahead and take a moment to think about all the calls you’ve thought were garbage over the last year or so.Think through all of USC football’s 13 games, and the basketball team’s 30 contests as well as the other sports played at USC.And I’m not just saying calls that harmed the Trojans — I can think of plenty calls that favored USC and hurt their opponents.But how many bad calls can you recall, just from memory?In October, the Trojans played Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. The Irish had a fourth-and-two situation from the USC 27-yard line in the first quarter. They used a fake goal to drive down to the two-yard line and set up a touchdown.But there was an obvious mistake. Notre Dame had a player run to the sideline, who appeared to exit the playing field, but he stayed on.The Thursday after the game, Pac-10 officiating coordinator Dave Cutaia admitted the refs had made a mistake on the play and two others during the game — including a personal foul call on Taylor Mays that turned out to occur when the opponent was still inbounds.But there was no benefit for USC after the game, of course. No team ever gets anything when an official admits mistake after the game.But the Trojans would’ve taken one of those for Saturday’s mishap.Looking Past the X’s and O’s runs Mondays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Pedro at pmoura@usc.edu.last_img read more

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Pat Spencer overpowers Nick Mellen with 9 points as Loyola tops Syracuse in NCAA tournament

first_img Published on May 11, 2019 at 5:30 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarez Facebook Twitter Google+ BALTIMORE — Before the first faceoff, the matchup was clear. Syracuse’s Nick Mellen would be stationed next to Loyola’s Pat Spencer on the edge of SU’s defensive zone. The officials and faceoff specialists readied and Mellen held his long-stick across Spencer’s chest. They had both been there before, facing another team’s best player. Now it was a matter of seeing who was better. For the better part of the last two years, Mellen has simplified SU’s defensive gameplan: No matter the size or skillset of a top-attack, Mellen wouldn’t be unmatched. For the last four years, Loyola deployed Spencer the same way, just on offense. Saturday’s biggest matchup boiled the game down to its core: one-on-one. Spencer hunted for shots and assists. Mellen did anything possible to stop, or at least limit, Spencer’s stardom. In the end, after their greatness linked them together for 60 minutes, Spencer had overpowered Mellen in Loyola’s (12-4, 7-1 Patriot League) 15-13 win over Syracuse (9-4, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) at the Ridley Athletic Complex. From the sidelines, SU coaches, who spent two weeks planning for Spencer, could just watch. He posted nine points (three goals, six assists), scored when needed and found grey jerseys at crucial moments to lead a Greyhound comeback after facing a four-goal deficit. Spencer’s afternoon — one in which he matched and set numerous NCAA records — ultimately carried Loyola to the second round of the NCAA tournament and ended Syracuse’s season. “He’s a load, number one,” Mellen said of guarding Spencer. “He’s a big guy, too. His vision is tremendous. He’s able to find the open guy even with a lot of pressure on him — by me.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textKaci Wasilewski | Senior Staff WriterLast week, Mellen downplayed his matchup with Spencer. The redshirt-junior that had locked down Cornell’s Jeff Teat and Hobart’s Eric Holden, among others, saw their clash as another matchup. During film review sessions, coaches would show SU players clips of an opponent’s top-performers. Spencer led off the Loyola highlights. While no Orange coach explicitly said that Mellen would defend Spencer, the defense knew that Mellen would draw the challenge, goalie Drake Porter said. When they went on the practice field to run through sets, Mellen jogged over to freshman attack Mikey Berkman, SU’s scout-team version of Spencer. “We were a little back and forth on things,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said of stopping Spencer. “I didn’t think we helped out like we could’ve. We wanted to see how the game was gonna go, how many opportunities he was gonna have.” In their first in-game battle, Mellen jabbed at Spencer’s stick 30-yards away from the goal. Loyola’s top attack charged left while Mellen side-shuffled. Approaching the crease, Spencer swung the ball to sophomore Aidan Olmstead, who then found senior John Duffy for a score. On fields with no hash marks, Mellen said he relied on other SU defenders to let him know how far he was from the cage since the Orange usually plays on football fields. Against Spencer, however, it didn’t matter. Other Orange jerseys rotated toward Spencer and opened a hole in the zone. Greyhounds head coach Charley Toomey said that his team wanted to attack SU from the goal line. At first, they inverted midfielders to set up big-little matchups. Then, they rolled Spencer behind and let him operate. Desko said that SU was prepared for the strategy. Again, it didn’t matter. The senior attack utilized his 6-foot-3, 205-pound-frame to pound the 5-foot-9, 185-pound Mellen through the zone. Spencer even dotted the midfield to scoop ground balls at times. In the first quarter, while backing Mellen down, Spencer lowered his shoulder and generated space. Facing Porter’s left, Spencer wrapped his stick around his shoulder and slipped one near post.  Porter turned and watched the replay. Spencer stared at the net, his work causing those in attendance to gasp loudly. From the sidelines, Desko rubbed his hands together and shook his head. For Mellen, it was the first goal he allowed to his assignment in a month-and-a-half.Kaci Wasilewski | Senior Staff WriterSU committed bodies inside and forced Spencer into four turnovers. Mellen covered his size disadvantage in spurts, consistently watching Spencer’s hips and smacking him with plastic. In one midfield scrum, three SU players collided into Spencer when Brett Kennedy ran in and sent Spencer tumbling.“Sometimes the going gets tight and I feel like I need to make a play and I need to get this team rolling,” Spencer said. “Sometimes I do. But, other times, they’re gonna slide quick and I gotta trust the guys to make the plays.” Down four goals late in the third quarter, Spencer said the offense didn’t rush — they knew they’d have a chance to come back. Standing at the top of the offense, staring back at an Orange zone man-down defense, Spencer picked out Olmstead for a strike. Then, Spencer clogged space and Olmstead found freshman Chase Scanlan for another score. Two back-to-back penalties later, SU had jump-started a Loyola run it couldn’t stop. With 1:11 left in the game, Spencer capped off the victory with a goal that bounced into an open net. Behind him, Mellen walked with hands on his hips. Spencer turned to the Loyola bench while his teammates rushed. Before they reached him, Spencer held his arms out one more time.He was the best player on the field on Saturday. He’d been there before. “I felt like I had (Mellen) from the start,” Spencer said. “He’s a good player. I just think there are spots I was able to get to on the field.” Commentslast_img read more

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Svenska Spel rolls out match-fixing education programme across football clubs

first_img StumbleUpon Share Swedish state-owned gambling operator Svenska Spel has strengthened its commitment to tackling match-fixing by rolling out a new digital education initiative across 2,328 football clubs.The aim of the initiative is to offer both athletes and football associations a greater understanding of the risks associated with match-fixing.The scheme, which includes information on spotting signs of problem gambling, has been rolled out to the clubs affiliated with Svenska Spel’s sponsorship project Gräsroten.“Athletes, who often live close to the game, are a clear risk group for suffering from gambling problems,” said Patrik Hofbauer, CEO of Svenska Spel.“Research shows that athletes, who often live near the game, are a clear risk group for suffering from gambling problems. Therefore, in our cooperation agreements with the Swedish Sports Federation, we have investments in just gaming responsibility. This is such an important investment.”Johan Claesson, integrity officer at the Swedish Football Association, added: “Match-fixing is one of the biggest threats to football, and unfortunately we have recently seen signs that criminal forces have wanted to influence the outcome of matches at a very low level.“This is something that we are very distant from, and that our main sponsor Svenska Spel is now taking the initiative to quickly train thousands of football players in the lower divisions in the subject of match-fixing, we think is very good. With more knowledge, it is easier to say no.”During 2020, debate in Sweden has continued in relation to Football restrictions and legal definitions attached to classifying amateur and junior level events.The leadership of Swedish betting and sports have asked national gambling inspectorate Spelinspektionen to clarify ‘grey areas’ attached to football wagering, as part of further Swedish gambling reforms intended this year.Kajsa Nylander, sustainability manager at Svenska Spel, emphasised that it is of growing importance for Sweden’s football associations to gain a thorough understanding of the topics.Nylander concluded: “Recently presented this year’s Sustainable Brand Index, Europe’s largest independent brand study focusing on sustainability. It clearly shows that the gaming industry has a decent uphill when it comes to the confidence of the Swedish people. Submit Related Articles Global Gaming adds sportsbook extension to Ninja property August 25, 2020 Share Winning Post: Swedish regulator pushes back on ‘Storebror’ approach to deposit limits August 24, 2020 Soft2Bet continues new market drive with Irokobet launch August 26, 2020last_img read more

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#AFCONonCiti: Egypt expel Amr Warda from the national team squad

first_img Source: King Fut The Egyptian Football Association (EFA) have expelled midfielder Amr Warda from the national team squad for behavioral reasons.Warda was initially called up to the 2019 African Cup of Nations (AFCON) squad after an outstanding season with Greek champions PAOK.However, the 25-year-old has been recently involved in a series of online harassment allegations after Egypt’s opening game in AFCON against Zimbabwe.The reason behind the EFA’s decision is that they want to maintain discipline and commitment within the team according to their statement.Egypt’s reduced 22-man squad will face DR Congo in their second game in Group A as the Pharaohs look to get a step closer to AFCON’s knockout stages.last_img

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Kenichi’s Diary: “Only the work on the pitch will answer all the questions”

first_imgNewly appointed Hearts of Oak coach Kenichi Yatsuhashi says he can’t be bothered by critics who have questioned his credentials.The Phobians have been mocked by football fans following their decision to appoint the hugely unknown Japanese-American based trainer.His competence is on the line and for many pundits, Hearts have taken a very bad decision. But the 46-year-old in an exclusive chat with Joy Sports noted that he is not perturbed and wants to do the talking on the pitch.“I feel very excited and I know that a lot of hard work is coming and let my work speak for itself,” he said“I had a meeting with management and board and all the things we spoke about will show on the pitch.When asked about talk that he has no experience and is not fit for the job, he note: “I have nothing to say about that at this moment.” Yatsuhashi who has been tasked to win next season’s Premier league says he is not under any pressure to make an impact at the club“The whole country is watching us and I will make sure I make the people happy, I like the pressure and only the work on the pitch will answer all the questions you are asking.”The Japanese American trainer will officially start work on Wednesday after holding a crunch meeting with the management and board members of the club.Click to read:Kenichi’s Diary: Robert Sackey says Hearts new coach is ‘very, very cheap’ Kenichi’s Diary: Nyaho charges new Hearts coach to win next league season Kenichi’s Diary: Robert Sackey says Hearts new coach is ‘very, very cheap’– See more at: http://www.myjoyonline.com/sports/2015/October-27th/kenichis-diary-robert-sackey-says-hearts-new-coach-is-very-very-cheap.php#sthash.yQdK5AN3.dpufKenichi’s Diary: Robert Sackey says Hearts new coach is ‘very, very cheap’– See more at: http://www.myjoyonline.com/sports/2015/October-27th/kenichis-diary-robert-sackey-says-hearts-new-coach-is-very-very-cheap.php#sthash.yQdK5AN3.dpuf– Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @Joy997FM. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

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How Chase Utley’s slide spurred MLB to change the rules

first_img“For the most part, I think it’s just going to take some time to police that, just like the home-plate collision rule. We’re three years removed from that rule, and there’s still some gray area there, which I think there’ll be some gray area with this one too, as expected. When a rule change happens in a sport that’s been around for centuries, it’s going to take a while to get adjusted to,” he said.Takeout slides and neighborhood plays will be subject to video review. In the past, the neighborhood play wasn’t subject to review.“A shortstop will drag his right foot across the back corner of the base. I don’t think that will ever change,” said Colorado manager Walt Weiss, a former All-Star shortstop. “The second baseman, I think, is more affected by this rule, because sometimes they leave the base before the ball gets there.”Said Asche: “I don’t think you can define a takeout slide. Because I think when those things happen, both parties have probably done something to put themselves in that situation.”Baseball and the union also agreed to limit mound visits by managers and pitching coaches to 30 seconds and to cut the countdown clock for between-innings breaks by 20 seconds, to 2:05 for most games and 2:25 for nationally televised matchups. A runner who makes a permissible slide cannot be charged with interference, even if he makes contact with a fielder.“Our goal in amending the slide rule was to enhance player safety, reduce incidents of injury and to do it in a way that respects and preserves the bona-fide hustle plays that are integral to our game,” union head Tony Clark said in a statement. “I am optimistic that this new rule will accomplish those goals.”Utley barreled into Tejada at Dodger Stadium in the NL division series last year. Tejada missed the World Series and Utley was suspended for two games, which is still under appeal.Chances are, fans will call this the Chase Utley Rule.“Did Chase catch him good? Yeah. Could Tejada have maybe done a couple things to get out of the way? Yeah. Neither of those things happened, so now we have something to talk about,” said Philadelphia infielder-outfielder Cody Asche, a former Utley teammate. NEW YORK — Baseball made its call on the Chase Utley slide: out.Major League Baseball and the players’ union have banned rolling block slides to break up potential double plays, hoping to prevent a repeat of the takeout by Utley that broke the leg of New York Mets shortstop Ruben Tejada in last year’s playoffs.Under the rules change announced Thursday, a runner must attempt a “bona fide slide,” defined as making contact with the ground ahead of the base, being in position to reach the base with a hand or foot and to remain on it, and sliding within reach of the base without changing his path to initiate contact with a fielder.An umpire can call both the runner and batter out for a violation. Baserunners may not elevate or kick a leg above the fielder’s knee or throw his arm or upper body.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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